Grateful Dead

Obama Event "Change Rocks" - Final Ticket Release

With regards to the Change Rocks event at the Bryce Jordan Center in State College, PA this Monday, October 13, please note the campaign has released a limited amount of tickets this morning which have been placed back into the system for sale to the General Public. Please go to www.ticketmaster.com for further details.

EVENT DETAILS:

WHO: Bob Weir, Phil Lesh, Bill Kreutzmann, and Mickey Hart, Gregg Allman, Butch Trucks, Jaimoe, Warren Haynes, Derek Trucks, Marc Quinones, Oteil Burbridge, and Jeff Chimenti

WHAT: Concert Fundraiser

WHERE: Bryce Jordan Center, Pennsylvania State University State College, PA

WHEN: Monday, October 13, 2008 - Doors Open 5:30 PM EDT

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mato1949's picture
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This Show

I'm wondering if the powers that be will allow tapers set up their rigs so that those of us that can't make it can enjoy the music made at this show. It would even be sweeter if the guys let the soundboard recordings of all the different combinations that will play loose on the net. Or maybe even make the complete show available through Dead.net as a download.

"When I die bury me deep, put two speakers at my feet, pair of ear phones on my head, and always play The Grateful Dead."

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Garcia interview 1981 audio Radisson hotel

Jerry Garcia Interview

Raddison Hotel, room 1503

St. Paul, MN

July 10, 1981

Disk 1

1. Intro>reckogning album> 03:06
2. Song Selections for acoustic sets> 01:27
3. Filming of Dead Ahead and other film projects> 04:08
4. Dead Set record> 01:10
5. 15 years so far> 01:18
6. Writing with Robert Hunter> 02:55
7. Working without a net> 03:26
8. The addition of Brent to the band> 00:55
9. Jerry on tapping shows! 01:05
10. Venue breakdowns> 02:06
11. Unbroken Chain?/Jerry's car> 01:13
12. Working without a net reprise> 03:01
13. Unbroken chain rehearsal tapes> 03:50
14. Improvisation vs. formula> 03:22
15. Looking forward to 1982> 03:09
16. Have you heard about Deadbase? 01:20
17. Introductions of freaks> 00:15
18. Jerry on the Midwest> 01:54
19> Jerry smokes a jay> 02:19
20. Is the Uptown Theatre (in Chicago) Closed? 03:30

Disk 2

1. /Getting Althea right> 02:02
2. Here's the jay> 04:57
3. Bobby Weird> 03:19
4. Touring across America> 04:25
5. Working with Phil and Micky> 04:30
6. Flying to gigs> 04:29
7. Pat calls for backstage passes> 01:49
8. Jerry bums a smoke> 02:58
9. Iko Iko and other song's mysteries> 03:22
10. Jerry on world events> 02:52
11. "This is not the right world for our trip"> 03:11
12. We got to get going 01:07
13. Althea/ (1981-07-10) 05:55

This audio is part of the collection: Open Source Audio

Author: Gtateful Dead
Date: 1981-07-10 00:00:00
Source: MC>C>AIFF>WAV>SHN

http://www.archive.org/details/jg1981-07-10-Interview.shnf

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pure thought a la Garcia 1993

Interviewer : What about in terms of the Dead? Were there times when the band was discouraged about its future?

JGarcia :

Well, there were times when we were really in chaotic spaces, but I don't think we've ever been totally discouraged. It just has never happened. There have been times everybody was off on their own trip to the extent that we barely communicated with each other. But it's pulses, you know? And right now everybody's relating pretty nicely to each other, and everybody's feeling very good, too. There's a kind of healthy glow through the whole Grateful Dead scene. We're gearing up for the millennium.

Interviewer : Oh, yeah? What's the plan?

JGarcia :

Well, our plan is to get through the millennium [laughs]. Apart from that, it's totally amorphous.

Interviewer: Historically, turns of the century have been really intriguing times. Does that date hold any real significance for you?

JGarcia :

No, the date that holds significance for me is 2012. That's Terence McKenna's alpha moment, which is where the universe undergoes its most extraordinary transformations. He talks about these cycles, exponential cycles in which, in each epic, more happens than in all previous time. Like he talks about novelty, the insertion of novelty into the time track. His first example of novelty is, say, the appearance of life. So the universe goes along, brrrrmmmmm, then all of a sudden, life appears: bing! So that's something new.

Then the next novelty is, like, vertebrates. Then the next novelty might be language -- that sort of thing. They're transformations of a huge kind, gains in consciousness. So he's got us, like, in the last forty-year cycle now -- it's running down, we're definitely tightening up -- and during this period, more will happen than has happened in all previous time. This is going to peak in 2012. He's got a specific date for it, too -- maybe December some time, I don't remember. But that moment, at the last 135th of a second or something like that, something like forty of these transformations will happen. Like immortality, you know [laughs]. It's an incredibly wonderful and totally transformational view of the universe. I love it, personally. It's my favorite ontoloy, my favorite endgame. It's much, much more visionary and sumptuous than . . . like, say, Christ is coming back [laughs]. "Oh, swell. That would be fun." McKenna's version is much more incredible.

Interviewer : Are you concerned about what you'd leave behind?

JGarcia :

No. I'm hoping to leave a clean field -- nothing, not a thing. I'm hoping they burn it all with me. I don't feel like there's this body of work that must exist. I'd just as soon take it all with me. There's enough stuff -- who needs the clutter, you know? I'd rather have my immortality here while I'm alive. I don't care if it lasts beyond me at all. I'd just as soon it didn't.

Interviewer ; Maybe it will just scorch in 2012.

JGarcia :

Yeah, I'm hoping that the transformations will make all that -- everything -- irrelevant. We'll all just go to the next universe as pure thought forms .....

[1993?]

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Jerry's antiwar sentiments [1987]

Not just "Peggy-O" and "Jack-a-roe" or many Dylan covers but this interview from 1987 [excerpt]

JGarcia:

It's like the storyteller makes no choice—and neither do we. And neither do you, and neither does anybody else. I prefer that. I prefer to be hanging.

I've always been really fond—in folk music, I've always been fond of the fragment. The song that has one verse. And you don't know anything about the characters, you don't know what they're doing, but they're doing something important. I love that. I'm really a sucker for that kind of song. There's a couple of songs in my acoustic set now, I get a chance to do the originals of some of the songs that Hunter and I later warped into alternate reality. There's a song that I do that—I think it's a Civil War song, although I'm not really sure. Its lyrics sound as though they date from about that period of time. But it's a fragment—it tells very little about what's happening. There's only three verses in it, but by the third verse—

Interviewer: What's it called?

JGarcia :

It's called "Two Soldiers." You haven't heard me do it out here.
I've loved the song for a long time—but I didn't learn it to do until we went to the East Coast.

Interviewer :What happens in it?

JGarcia :

Well, this tune starts off with a Boston boy and a friend sitting around a campfire, and the Boston boy is saying, "I'll do what you want me to, provided you write to my mother, if I—if something happens to me." So we don't know what the other guy wanted him to do, and then he talks about his mother a little, like a good 19th-century boy. He talks about his mother a little, and then they go off to the battle. And then there's a great verse of battle stuff that has incredible lines in it. And the battle is over, and at the end of the battle the people who are dead, left on the hill after the battle, are the boy with the curly hair, the Boston boy, and the person he was talking to. So there's nobody to write to mother, and it ends.

There's so little to it that you just barely understand what happened. Undoubtedly it was originally 20 verses. But it's got a beautiful melody and it's just real evocative. It's the kind of thing I'm a real sucker for. It's just a beautiful tune.

Interviewer :"Sugaree" is kind of like that for me.

JGarcia :

Yeah, "Sugaree" is kind of like that. I like for a song to work that way. All my favorite stuff is like that. They're like little. . .

But that's own my personal bias, and Hunter's really aware of it. So he knows how to really—I mean, if I want him to do something that's mysterious, he knows just what I like. And he writes me really well. When he does something that's my point of view autobiographically—like "Mission in the Rain" is a song that he wrote that's me.

It's like it scratches that itch—any desire I have to write a song from my own point of view, Hunter does it as well as I could do it. So I go with his version. It's a lucky combination that works very well.

Interviewer :It seems to me that the vast majority of the first 22 years of Grateful Dead songs have been situated in their own universe, that's everywhere and everyplace and nowhere and no place.

JGarcia :

That's right.

Interviewer ;

And it seems to me on the other hand that "In the Dark" is very much a creature of the '80s.

JGarcia :

Well, we're starting to find that place right here. That place that used to not have any strict location—I think if you take In the Dark and put it in some other decade, it speaks to that decade just as clearly. And it's equally nonspecific. I mean, if you really listen to it carefully it doesn't say anything that pins it to the '80s.

It's stuff that pins it to this world, though. That may be the difference—we're finding that living this long of a time in this world and surviving it, there's some things that you start to be prepared to talk about......

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TICKETS ON SALE NOW !

AT TICKETMASTER

--DECENT SEATS AT $50 --APPARENTLY PSU STUDENTS ARE GETTING $30 GA's !

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SLEEP APNEA

What is less well known about Garcia was the fact that he suffered for most of his life from a condition called sleep apnea. His sleep apnea was apparently diagnosed before he died, but it is unlikely that he ever took any steps to treat it. That his case might have been relatively severe may be surmised by the comments of his band mate, Phil Lesh. In Lesh's book, Searching for the Sound, Lesh relates how he and others were impressed with Garcia's loud and widely fluctuating snoring.

GARCIA'S MESSAGE FROM THE NEXT WORLD : "THE ONLY PERSON WHO DOESN'T SNORE IS THE LAST ONE TO FALL ASLEEP"

--mc

SEE YOU ALL IN STATE COLLEGE FOLKS THIS IS THE REAL DEAL --ANOTHER SHOW !

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JERRY QUOTE FROM THE "TODAY SHOW" 1981 :

Gene Shalit: How do you play at that frantic volume and sustain any kind of rational mind?

Jerry Garcia: It’s like a dog hanging its head out a car window.

Shalit: You love it.

Garcia: Yeah.

- The Today Show (NBC-TV) 3/21/1981

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JERRY'S ROLLING STONE INTERVIEW 1972 W MOUNTAIN GIRL AT HIS SIDE

http://www.marknoferi.com/garcia.html

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WWJD ?

Jerry will only be there in spirit.

here's the Garcia interview [most of it] from the early 1980s re Jerry not wanting to support an individual politician :

JGarcia:

We're friendly. For me, I can't see relating to the audience any other way. We exist by their grace. It's very hard for me to do anything but like them. They're nice people. This thing of following bands on the road is very funny. Some bands make it hard for other bands; some audiences are real rowdy and smash everything. You get lumped in with everybody, and you have to constantly separate yourself. Listen, our audience is not the Black Sabbath audience.

JC: So your main responsibility is to your audience.

JGarcia:

Sure. Of course, we want to give them their money's worth, but we also want to avoid putting them in positions of harm. There are some places in America where we can't play because of the friction between the local authorities and the audience. We've had the experience of, basically, acting as bait. The first couple of times we played Nassau Coliseum on Long Island, the police busted about 100 people. They took advantage of the situation. We have to try to make sure that doesn't happen.

JC: Have you ever worked for the authorities? Would you ever consider playing to support a political candidate?

JGarcia:

Never. We draw the line at that. Who's that cool, really? Who's so cool you would want them leading people? Nobody, certainly no politician. We've been hit on by all kinds of them, candidates, gurus, holy men. All kinds of power freaks have hit on us at one time or another to raise money for them or get on the bandwagon and sell their trip. It's our responsibility to keep ourselves free of those connotations. I want the Grateful Dead experience to be one of those things that doesn't have a hook. We're all very anti-authoritarian. There's nothing that we believe so uniformly and so totally that we could use the Grateful Dead to advertise it.

JC: Not even toothpaste?

JGarcia:

Not even REAL GOOD toothpaste.

JC: Do you still get hassled by the law?

JGarcia:

It's an ever-present danger. I have a feeling this whole Reagan era means a tightening down from the top, so we're always on guard. We try to be as cool as we possibly can. The world is still not that safe for people like us. But I don't think any law enforcement agency sees us as a real menace.

JC: That's interesting, because ten years ago you were perceived as a menace to public health and safety.

JGarcia:

Well, we might still be. It's just that nothing's ever come of it. No major disasters or anything; our audience comes out for a good time and that's it. We've had countless sheriffs and chiefs of police giving us points because they've dealt with our crowd, and they know the difference between our crowd and other crowds. I mean, maybe I'm wrong. Maybe they have thick dossiers on all of us and they're just waiting for us to make a false move. But I don't think so. I think we've won the fight against our Sixties image.

JC: But that image was cultivated. The skulls and the Hell's Angels and. . .

JGarcia:

Well, let me put it this way: We didn't make any effort to avoid scaring people. But we didn't think we'd scare them as much as we did. It all seemed pretty normal to us.

JC: Were you surprised by the power of the images you put forth, by the power that other people invested in you because of them?

JGarcia:

Well, one of the things about the name, right from the beginning, was that it has a lot of power. It was kind of creepy. People resisted it at first. They didn't want us to be the Grateful Dead. It was too weird. But that response has sort of flattened out. I don't think the connotation is anywhere near as creepy as it used to be, though sometimes the power is very evident. It comes back to us. Every once in a while, some soul out there overamps. And all of a sudden there's a guy banging on the door with a whole complex pathology, a whole weird Grateful Dead universe woven up with images from our stuff.

JC: Well, at least that's not happening much anymore.

JGarcia:

Hopefully there aren't as many suckers for rhetoric now. It was so obvious what was happening back in those days. Like the Black Panthers. I mean, what happens when a bunch of black guys put on berets and start packing submachine guns? They're going to get killed, man, they're going to get fucking killed. You can't do that in America. You can't wave guns in the faces of the biggest guns in the world. It's suicide. That's obvious, but how could you say it? LIke, all that campus confusion seemed laughable too. Why enter this closed society and make an effort to liberalize it when that's never been its function? Why not just leave it and go somewhere else? Why not act out your fantasies, using the positive side of your nature rather than just struggling? Just turn your back on it and split - it's easy enough to find a place where people will leave you alone. You don't have to create confrontation. It's a game, and it's a no-win game. I remember once being at a be-in or one of those things, and the Berkeley contingent - Jerry Rubin and those guys - got up on stage and started haranguing the crowd. All of a sudden it was like everybody who had ever harangued a crowd. It was every asshole who told people what to do. The words didn't matter. It was that angry tone. It scared me; it made me sick to my stomach.

JC: Well, it must be hard to be stuck with your own charisma, discovering that you have it and not knowing what to do with it.

JGarcia:

Yeah. It's the only thing you have. And charisma is no shield. It's not something you can hide behind. All you can do with it is stuff like making speeches. And where do you go with that? It's a drag to be a celebrity. It can even be a drag to be a talented celebrity, with something to do. But if you're not a performer, being a celebrity could be all negative.

JC: But don't you have people coming around and saying, "Be my leader; tell me what I'm supposed to do"?

JGarcia:

We tell them we don't know. I've made every effort to tell them that we're not in a position to lead, that everybody's going to have to lead themselves. What it boils down to is: Who do you trust? Who would be such a perfect kind of person that you would trust him enough to follow him? Nobody I know. And even fewer people want to lead. And the kind of people who do want to lead are mostly assholes. I mean, being a politician is a lot like being a stand-up comic. The only thing you have is your personality, and the only thing you can do is stand up and say, "It's me, it's me, it's me." What kind of personality do you have to have to do such a thing? Do you want someone with that kind of personality controlling your life? No sir.

NOW FELLOW DEADHEADS AND RELATED FANS REMEMBER THAT :

1. JERRY NEVER MET OR SAW SENATOR OBAMA

2. IF JERRY TRUSTED HIM AS HE SAYS HE'LL BE THERE ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE STAGE PLAYING LEAD FROM ANOTHER UNIVERSE WE CAN'T SEE

3.AS MY WIFE POINTED OUT --BOB PHIL MICKEY AND BILL --NOT TO MENTION THE ALLMAN BROTHERS-- HAVE EVERY RIGHT IN THE WORLD TO DO THIS SHOW IN SUPPORT OF THE PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE THEY SUPPORT--IN THE SPIRIT JERRY GETS NO "SAY" HERE FOLKS DEAL WITH IT

4. JERRY IS NO LONGER ALIVE IN THE PHYSICAL WORLD NOR IS HE ON THE BALLOT-- SO I AM VOTING FOR OBAMA --THE AUDIENCE HAS THE RIGHT TO DISSENT BUT LET THE BAND HAVE A SAY SINCE IT IS THEIR CONCERT FOR THEIR POLITICAL REASONS AND NOT "OUR" CONCERT

5. HOPEFULLY GOVERNOR RENDELL OR WHOEVER IT WILL BE CAN KEEP ANY CHEERLEADING FOR PRESIDENT OBAMA TO A MINIMUM --OBAMA IS GOING TO WIN THE ELECTION-- HE IS OUR NEXT PRESIDENT --HE WILL BE A TREMENDOUS IMPROVEMENT OVER BUSH --AND HOPEFULLY RESTORE THE INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION OF THE USA --AND REPEAL THE BUSH DOCTRINE --BEFORE CHINA ADOPTS IT AS THEIR OWN AND NUKES US PREEMPTIVELY .......

AND LAST BUT NOT LEAST.....

once the show starts [with "Promised Land"?] we can forget about dissension and join in the sound......and if the band feels good about this show a Spring/summer "final" Dead tour just may happen.....

peace......

STOP THE WAR IN IRAQ IT IS BANKRUPTING THE NATION

--mike "mcleary"

p.s. LEAVE ONLY FOOTPRINTS

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Correction

ACORN hires low-income folks to go out and collect signatures, and they pay them by the number they turn in. Some of those signature gatherers defraud ACORN by making up names.

Sorry. That should read:

ACORN hires low-income folks to go out and register voters, and they pay them by the number they turn in. Some of those registration gatherers defraud ACORN by making up names.

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