Grateful Dead

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izzie's picture
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mkav's picture
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I liked it. I watched all episodes in one sitting, so some of the details are blurry.
Overall, I agree that Parrish got too much air time, even if everything he said was straight up true. (Side note...watch Wayne's World 2, the expert they bring on to help get Waynestock going seems to be modeled after Parrish).
I don't think I necessarily learned anything startling or new, because I've read some of the books and articles, and was there for a tiny part of the scene, but I think the overall project was done and presented well.
Hearing Jerry's own words and voice about the impact of his dad's death was compelling.
I have read (Bill's book for one) and now have seen/heard about the quantity and frequency of drugs ingested, and wonder how they functioned at all. I'm sure some would say that is how they managed to function in their own particular way.
My only (small) disappointment was their using the Winterland footage from the Grateful Dead Movie as if was a news feel or personal movie or something. Maybe they figured we all I knew it, so why even comment?
Anyway, I give it 2 thumbs up, as someone used to say. I'll watch it again at some point, because I did watch it all in one night, so I'm sure I missed details.

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I'm still digesting it. I really liked parts, and I was "glad" they didn't gloss over Jerry's struggles with stardom and drugs at the end. As well as how their finally reaching fame sort of was their undoing.

I was disappointed at the screen time Parish got. Having read his book, I was already somewhat jaded against his version of their history. He kind of tries to glorify the transition to hard drugs and rationalizes his enabling of Jerry's heroin addiction.

I suppose I would have preferred more content like Trixie or Barbara, who gave heartfelt interviews behind the scenes. Parish seemed more to glamorize the wrong things.

As for the cinematography and such, I'm not sure. I liked how they weaved songs into the narrative, but the quick stock clips to literally show things said was not my favorite. A specific example is eluding me, but they would have been like, if the speaker said "and we took off like a rocket", we would cut to video of a NASA rocket taking off. Sometimes done, could be quirky, but it seemed like every analogy was done. I did, however, really like how they wove Frankenstein in. That was cool.

But all in all, I'm glad it was made and that I got to see it.

Peace,

-Dave

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Dave, I liked it a lot. It wasn't comprehensive but it was real. Like a Shakespeare tragedy with a kickass soundtrack.
What did you think?

dwlemen's picture
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Long Strange Trip

Just finished watching the new documentary last night. Was curious what everyone else's thoughts were on it?

Peace,

-Dave

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Hubert Selby Jr: It/ll Be Better Tomorrow

Hubert Selby Jr: It/ll Be Better Tomorrow

Directed by Michael W. Dean, Kenneth Shiffrin
Edited by Ryan Brown
Producers: Michael W. Dean, Ryan Brown
Executive Producers: Suzanne Selby, Kenneth Shiffrin
Narrated by Robert Downey, Jr.
Narration written by Michael W. Dean
Featuring: Hubert Selby Jr. & Alexis Arquette, Amiri Baraka, Anthony Di Novi, Arthur Boyars, Carmine "Tony" DeFeo, Darren Aronofsky, Desmond Nakano, Ellen Burstyn, Gilbert Sorrentino, Henry Rollins, James R. Giles, James Ragan, James Remar, Jared Leto, Jem Cohen, Jerry Stahl, John Calder, Kaytie Lee, Kenneth Shiffrin, Lou Reed, Luke Davies, Matt Polish, Michael Lally, Michael Silverblatt, Nick Tosches, Nicolas Winding Refn, Richard Price, Susan Anton, Susan Compo, Uli Edel

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Rising Tones Cross

Rising Tones Cross

Direction, Camera: Ebba Jahn
Editing: Jeanette Menzel
Sound: Jost Gebers, Karola Michalic Ritter, Renate Sami
2nd Camera: Brian Denitz

Featuring: Charles Gayle, William Parker, Patricia Nicholson, Peter Kowald Quartet, Peter Kowald Trio, John Zorn Duo, Billy Bang's Forbidden Planet, William Parker & Patricia Nicholson Ensemble, Charles Tyler Quintet, Don Cherry & The Sound Unity Festival Orchestra, Jemeel Moondoc Sextet, Iréne Schweizer Duo, Peter Brötzmann Ensemble

The early 1980s were a period of transition for the avant-garde in New York. The loft scene - the days in which Ornette Coleman's home on Prince Street and Sam River's Studio Rivbea provided workshops for experimenters to develop their art - was drawing to a close, and the arrival of the Knitting Factory and it's explosive impact on the Downtown scene was still a few years away. It fell to the artists themselves to create new opportunities. As chronicled in Ebba Jahn's 1984 documentary, Rising Tones Cross, two such motivated visionaries were bassist William Parker and dancer Patricia Nicholson. The film centers around the Sound Unity Festival, a precursor to the couples' current Lower East Side bash, the Vision Festival.
This film is a documentary composition of new jazz, New York as the city that generates it, and the musicians playing it.
The thoughts of the saxophonist Charles Gayle and the bass players William Parker and Peter Kowald from Germany accompany the film.

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Freedom Riders

Freedom Riders

Directed by Stanley Nelson
Producer: Laurens Grant
Editors: Lewis Erskine, Aljernon Tunsil

In 1961, during the first year of John F. Kennedy’s presidency, more than four hundred Americans participated in a bold and dangerous experiment designed to awaken the conscience of a complacent nation.

These self-proclaimed “Freedom Riders” challenged the mores of a racially segregated society by performing a disarmingly simple act. Traveling together in small interracial groups, they sat where they pleased on buses and trains and demanded unrestricted access to terminal restaurants and waiting rooms, even in areas of the Deep South where such behavior was forbidden by law and custom.

Their efforts were met with extreme violence and brought international attention to the fight against segregation, exploitation and racism known as the Civil Rights Movement. Freedom Riders chronicles the story behind this courageous group of civil rights activists.

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Freedom Summer

Freedom Summer

Directed by Stanley Nelson
Screenwriter: Stanley Nelson
Producers: Stanley Nelson, Cyndee Readdean
Edited by Aljernon Tunsil

Over ten memorable weeks known as Freedom Summer, more than 700 student volunteers joined with organizers and local African Americans in an historic effort to shatter the foundations of white supremacy in Mississippi, the nation’s most segregated state. The summer was marked by sustained and deadly violence, including the notorious murders of three civil rights workers, countless beatings, the burning of thirty-five churches, and the bombing of seventy homes and community centers.

In the face of this violence, these organizers, volunteers, and Mississippians worked together to canvass for voter registration, create Freedom Schools, and establish an alternative challenge to the State Democratic Party — the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Borne of Freedom Summer, and in response to the challenges of registering voters directly within hostile Mississippi, the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party registered its own voters outside of the discriminatory system, ultimately sending a delegation of 68 members to attend the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City to confront and unseat the all-white delegation.

FREEDOM SUMMER highlights an overlooked, but essential element of the Civil Rights Movement: the patient and long-term efforts by both outside activists and local citizens in Mississippi to organize communities and register black voters — even in the face of intimidation, physical violence and death. The Freedom Summer story reminds us that the movement that ended segregation was far more complex than most of us know.

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RL/Grenada

A related documentary, "Heartbreak Ridge", tells the compelling story of Clint Eastwood's little known parallel 30-year career as a Gunny Sergeant, under whose gruffly stern (sternly gruff? bear stearns?), but loving, tutelage Mario Van Peebles - following washout from acting and modeling jobs - comes of age against the high drama of the D-Day-like Grenada invasion. I wish Hollywood would make movies half this exciting!

Of course, "Heartbreak" is filmed without concern for the geopolitical, socioeconomic, or cultural nuances that are likely addressed by "The Future...". But all that stuff is probably fake liberal news anyway./peace,K

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The Black Panthers: Vanguard Of The Revolution

The Black Panthers: Vanguard Of The Revolution

https://archive.org/details/the-black-panthers-vanguard-of-the-revolutio...

Directed by Stanley Nelson
Produced by Laurens Grant, Stanley Nelson
Edited by Aljernon Tunsil

Change was coming to America and the fault lines could no longer be ignored—cities were burning, Vietnam was exploding, and disputes raged over equality and civil rights. A new revolutionary culture was emerging and it sought to drastically transform the system. The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense would, for a short time, put itself at the vanguard of that change.

THE BLACK PANTHERS: VANGUARD OF THE REVOLUTION is the first feature length documentary to explore the Black Panther Party, its significance to the broader American culture, its cultural and political awakening for black people, and the painful lessons wrought when a movement derails. Master documentarian Stanley Nelson goes straight to the source, weaving a treasure trove of rare archival footage with the voices of the people who were there: police, FBI informants, journalists, white supporters and detractors, and Black Panthers who remained loyal to the party and those who left it. Featuring Kathleen Cleaver, Jamal Joseph, and many others, THE BLACK PANTHERS: VANGUARD OF THE REVOLUTION is an essential history and a vibrant chronicle of this pivotal movement that birthed a new revolutionary culture in America.

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Bigger Than A Drive-In Movie, Ooo-whee!