Comments

sort by
Recent
Reset
  • August 17, 2018 - 11:44am
    marye
    Joined:
    May 26, 2007
    Shinyribs, Brokedown Palace
  • October 3, 2017 - 1:12am
    martin.george
    Joined:
    October 3, 2017
    A movie from the Sundance
    A movie from the Sundance Channel about an Irish cop named Sgt. Boyle. The opening scene is really good with a bunch of kids partying in a car going down a country road passing around a bottle of whisky.
  • July 28, 2017 - 7:35am
    Randall Lard
    Joined:
    July 30, 2012
    Inuto Imago
    Inuto Imago Setouchi Triennale 2016 Inujima Performing Arts Program Kazuhisa Uchihashi Inujima Sound Project “Inuto Imago” Improvise music and musical workshop program held in Inujima Island Japan August 22 (Mon) - September 4 (Sun), 2016 Artists: Kazuhisa Uchihashi (JP) Rully Shabara (ID) Wukir Suryadi (ID) Iman Jimbot (ID) Featuring Artists : Samm Bennett (US/JP) Isabelle Duthoit (FR) Masaharu Sato (JP) Mikagami Koichi (JP) Hannoda Taku (JP) Yumiko Tanaka (JP) Concept: Kazuhisa Uchihashi Film by Gigi Priadji Produce & Production Management: Akane Nakamura Yoko Kawasaki (SAYATEI) Mihoka Kawamura Hikaru Tsuchiya Megumi Mizuno http://gigipriadji.net
  • June 8, 2017 - 5:41pm
    mkav
    Joined:
    June 30, 2007
    LST
    I liked it. I watched all episodes in one sitting, so some of the details are blurry.Overall, I agree that Parrish got too much air time, even if everything he said was straight up true. (Side note...watch Wayne's World 2, the expert they bring on to help get Waynestock going seems to be modeled after Parrish). I don't think I necessarily learned anything startling or new, because I've read some of the books and articles, and was there for a tiny part of the scene, but I think the overall project was done and presented well. Hearing Jerry's own words and voice about the impact of his dad's death was compelling. I have read (Bill's book for one) and now have seen/heard about the quantity and frequency of drugs ingested, and wonder how they functioned at all. I'm sure some would say that is how they managed to function in their own particular way. My only (small) disappointment was their using the Winterland footage from the Grateful Dead Movie as if was a news feel or personal movie or something. Maybe they figured we all I knew it, so why even comment? Anyway, I give it 2 thumbs up, as someone used to say. I'll watch it again at some point, because I did watch it all in one night, so I'm sure I missed details.
  • June 8, 2017 - 10:30am
    dwlemen
    Joined:
    June 23, 2007
    LST
    I'm still digesting it. I really liked parts, and I was "glad" they didn't gloss over Jerry's struggles with stardom and drugs at the end. As well as how their finally reaching fame sort of was their undoing. I was disappointed at the screen time Parish got. Having read his book, I was already somewhat jaded against his version of their history. He kind of tries to glorify the transition to hard drugs and rationalizes his enabling of Jerry's heroin addiction. I suppose I would have preferred more content like Trixie or Barbara, who gave heartfelt interviews behind the scenes. Parish seemed more to glamorize the wrong things. As for the cinematography and such, I'm not sure. I liked how they weaved songs into the narrative, but the quick stock clips to literally show things said was not my favorite. A specific example is eluding me, but they would have been like, if the speaker said "and we took off like a rocket", we would cut to video of a NASA rocket taking off. Sometimes done, could be quirky, but it seemed like every analogy was done. I did, however, really like how they wove Frankenstein in. That was cool. But all in all, I'm glad it was made and that I got to see it. Peace, -Dave
  • June 8, 2017 - 10:02am
    rgergelis
    Default Avatar
    Joined:
    February 21, 2011
    LST
    Dave, I liked it a lot. It wasn't comprehensive but it was real. Like a Shakespeare tragedy with a kickass soundtrack. What did you think?
  • June 8, 2017 - 8:44am
    dwlemen
    Joined:
    June 23, 2007
    Long Strange Trip
    Just finished watching the new documentary last night. Was curious what everyone else's thoughts were on it? Peace, -Dave
  • May 8, 2017 - 8:31am
    Randall Lard
    Joined:
    July 30, 2012
    Hubert Selby Jr: It/ll Be Better Tomorrow
    Hubert Selby Jr: It/ll Be Better Tomorrow Directed by Michael W. Dean, Kenneth Shiffrin Edited by Ryan Brown Producers: Michael W. Dean, Ryan Brown Executive Producers: Suzanne Selby, Kenneth Shiffrin Narrated by Robert Downey, Jr. Narration written by Michael W. Dean Featuring: Hubert Selby Jr. & Alexis Arquette, Amiri Baraka, Anthony Di Novi, Arthur Boyars, Carmine "Tony" DeFeo, Darren Aronofsky, Desmond Nakano, Ellen Burstyn, Gilbert Sorrentino, Henry Rollins, James R. Giles, James Ragan, James Remar, Jared Leto, Jem Cohen, Jerry Stahl, John Calder, Kaytie Lee, Kenneth Shiffrin, Lou Reed, Luke Davies, Matt Polish, Michael Lally, Michael Silverblatt, Nick Tosches, Nicolas Winding Refn, Richard Price, Susan Anton, Susan Compo, Uli Edel
  • April 26, 2017 - 7:42am
    Randall Lard
    Joined:
    July 30, 2012
    Rising Tones Cross
    Rising Tones Cross Direction, Camera: Ebba Jahn Editing: Jeanette Menzel Sound: Jost Gebers, Karola Michalic Ritter, Renate Sami 2nd Camera: Brian Denitz Featuring: Charles Gayle, William Parker, Patricia Nicholson, Peter Kowald Quartet, Peter Kowald Trio, John Zorn Duo, Billy Bang's Forbidden Planet, William Parker & Patricia Nicholson Ensemble, Charles Tyler Quintet, Don Cherry & The Sound Unity Festival Orchestra, Jemeel Moondoc Sextet, Iréne Schweizer Duo, Peter Brötzmann Ensemble The early 1980s were a period of transition for the avant-garde in New York. The loft scene - the days in which Ornette Coleman's home on Prince Street and Sam River's Studio Rivbea provided workshops for experimenters to develop their art - was drawing to a close, and the arrival of the Knitting Factory and it's explosive impact on the Downtown scene was still a few years away. It fell to the artists themselves to create new opportunities. As chronicled in Ebba Jahn's 1984 documentary, Rising Tones Cross, two such motivated visionaries were bassist William Parker and dancer Patricia Nicholson. The film centers around the Sound Unity Festival, a precursor to the couples' current Lower East Side bash, the Vision Festival. This film is a documentary composition of new jazz, New York as the city that generates it, and the musicians playing it. The thoughts of the saxophonist Charles Gayle and the bass players William Parker and Peter Kowald from Germany accompany the film.
  • April 25, 2017 - 7:51am
    Randall Lard
    Joined:
    July 30, 2012
    Freedom Riders
    Freedom Riders Directed by Stanley Nelson Producer: Laurens Grant Editors: Lewis Erskine, Aljernon Tunsil In 1961, during the first year of John F. Kennedy’s presidency, more than four hundred Americans participated in a bold and dangerous experiment designed to awaken the conscience of a complacent nation. These self-proclaimed “Freedom Riders” challenged the mores of a racially segregated society by performing a disarmingly simple act. Traveling together in small interracial groups, they sat where they pleased on buses and trains and demanded unrestricted access to terminal restaurants and waiting rooms, even in areas of the Deep South where such behavior was forbidden by law and custom. Their efforts were met with extreme violence and brought international attention to the fight against segregation, exploitation and racism known as the Civil Rights Movement. Freedom Riders chronicles the story behind this courageous group of civil rights activists.
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Forums
Let's talk movies!!
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

That I have really bad taste in movies....Mosquito, Eight Legged Freaks & of course the best movie of all Dawn Of the Dead featuring the first Zombie Baby!! Gotta love them zombies...dead at heart and in mind lol brains!!!! Life's too short to be blue...
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

...yep- 2001 A Space Odyssey. (stanley kubrick rocks.)
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

I have to say that Repo Man is up there for me. Clerks, Full Metal Jacket, Tommy Boy.And who can forget The Grateful Dead Movie!!!!
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

CCJoe, I can't see your attachments (here at work, right now) so I'll have to wait 'till I get home to see what you posted but NOTHING is bigger than The Big Lebowski, the greatest movie ever made! I learned in mechanical drawing class (many years ago) to avoid being redundant and I've probably over applied that concept in other areas of life that may require more direct communication. So indeed TBL would be, by default, # 1 on my list. I've also been avoiding putting some of the other movie titles we had on the previous board, to allow our missing commrades time to post up themselves. That had been one of my favorite threads before we moved. "This aggression will not stand, man....."
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

I feel how you feel, GRTUD. yeah, I didn't really feel like repeating myself again either... where is the archive with all of our old posts?? but this shit: http://www.angryalien.com/ I will put in again. very cool folks, and funny as shit. by the by, it has NOTHING to do with that other rabbit. peace.
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

11 years 4 months
Permalink

Is this for real? I am going to try it as soon as blockbuster gets Wizard of Ozz back in..Roger Waters was a trip last week at the Hollywood Bowl..
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

I'm the Dude so that's what you call me...or his Dudeness or el Dudarino, if you're not into the whole brevity thing.....I"M BACK!!!! YEAH!!!! Looks like they got the situation worked out with comcast email addresses so I'm back to being GRTUD and it feels gooooood. The Dude Abides!
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

"Before you step on board Sir, your name I'd like to know" "Already know what I need to know Name, address and phone number, Lord And just how far to go Looking for a chateau"
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

Tommy Boy is an awesome movie! One of my all time favorites.'Cmon ya'll this was a good thread on the old boards. Anyone seen the new "Pirates" movie? How 'bout the new "Die Hard" that comes out today? "What we seem to have here, is a failure to communicate!"
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

Film studies is kind of a hobby of mine. It would take too long to list all of my favorites, and if you asked me tomorrow, my list would look very different. Here are a few of my favorites in no particular order: NASHVILLE (Robert Altman-1975) Arguably Altman's masterpiece (Macabe & Mrs. Miller and Short Cuts being the other "great" Altman films), and one of the great movies about America in the '70's It also speaks presciently about the world today as well. "It don't worry me", indeed. RAN (Akira Kurosawa-1985) Kurosawa is my favorite director, and all of his films are favorites of mine, but this is simply one of the greatest films of all time. Kurosawa re-imagines Shakespeare's King Lear in 16th century Japan. The hubris of man. Shot entirely in deep focus with drenching color, this film is beautiful to look at as well. The first major battle scene was Spielberg's inspiration for the opening of Saving Private Ryan. Of course Kurosawa's films have always inspired western directors: Lucas used Hidden Fortress as the basis for Star Wars, Yojimbo was remade into A Fist Full of Dollars, The Seven Samarui was remade into The Magnificent Seven. THE THIRD MAN (Carol Reed-1947) Post War Berlin. Intrigue! Surprises! Mystery! Weird camera angles! Orson Welles, a ferris wheel, and the coo coo clock speech! Also a killer zither musical score (that's right, I said a killer zither score!) MODERN TIMES (Charlie Chaplin-1936) My favorite Chaplin film. This is one of the funniest movies you'll ever see. The mix-up in the prison when The Tramp accidentally get high on cocaine is hilarious. The first time I saw it I almost peed my pants. AMARCORD (Frederico Fellini-1973) I am not that big a fan of Fellini, but this film knocked my socks off. A sentimental, funny, and hallucinatory remembrance of growing up in early Mussolini Italy (The title means "I Remember"). DISCREET CHARM OF THE BOURGEOISIE (Luis Bunuel-1972) Bunuel was the king of film surrealism, and social criticism. Also recommended by Bunuel: The Exterminating Angel, Un Chien Andelu and L'Age D'Or (The last two were made with Salvador Dali in 1928 and were banned for like 60 years. Andelu has the famous shot of a woman's eye getting sliced.) THE WILD BUNCH (Sam Peckinpah-1969) If you like shootouts in your westerns, it doesn't get any better than this. BRAZIL (Terry Gilliam-1985) Gilliam's wacky and epic masterpiece. A funny and surreal fable about the emptiness of"modern" life. Make sure you see the director's cut. RAGING BULL (Martin Scorsese-1980) The most visceral character study I've ever seen. It is a damn perfect film. THE NATURAL (Barry Levinson-1984) Adapted from the brilliant Bernard Malamud novel, this film mixes motifs from classical mythology with American and baseball mythology. It works better than you might think. Yo Soy Boricua!
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

http://www.sensesofcinema.com/contents/directors/02/kurosawa.html I had the great opportunity years back to see almost all of Kurosawa's films, some that I really liked: Drunken Angel (1948), The Quiet Duel (1949). Stray Dog (1949 Scandal (1950) and there was another I liked called Dodeskaden (1970) about a semi retarded boy who loved trains... I just read on the above link website, it was panned by the Japanese critics and Kurosawa attempted suicide because of that. fuck the critics, I thought it was great. and Scorcese is the master of American film in my book, almost everyone has seen Goodfellas, but I also really like After Hours. http://www.sensesofcinema.com/contents/directors/02/scorsese.html peace.
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

Hey CC, I really like After Hours too. One of Scorsese's underrated films along with King of Comedy.As for Kurosawa, the Japanese critics were always hard on Kurosawa because his films were thought to be too "western." Yojimbo is essentially a Samurai western. His favorite director was John Ford. Anyway, he didn't do much in the '70s after his suicide attempt. He did get funding from the USSR for the little seen Dersu Urzula. It's really a good film. Well, his comeback was spurred by Scorsese, Lucas, and Coppola personally funding 1980's Kagemusha, which was something of a dress-rehearsal for Ran. Incidentally, Scorsese makes a cameo in Kurosawa's 1990 film Dreams. It's a beautifully strange film. He literally filmed his dreams. Interesting. Yo Soy Boricua!
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

has anyone ever seen to live ad die in L.A.? it has a car chase scene that is up there with bullitt(another classic) and french connection(yet another classic)...did steve mcqueen ever make a bad movie? lebowski is in the coen triple play of raising arizona and fargo..."I'll take these here Huggies and any money that you might have in the register."
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

yeah, I think he showed a bit too much of the under-belly of post war Japan is another reason, unfortunately my 'source' for free sub-titled Kurosawa films dried up years ago but it was great while it lasted.... I saw most of his early stuff, but not too many in the 70's or 80's genre. I always prefered his modern set films, especially the ones with gangsters or evil do-ers. but I dug Yojimbo, too. have you ever seen any Japanese Yakuza fims? (a lot were made in the 1970's) many are kind of cheesy, but they are an interesting sub-culture. I'll try to find 'Dreams' peace.
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

Great movie! One of my favs as a kid. I saw this at the movie theater and really felt like I was in that car going up and down the hills of SF. Years later when I actually went to SF I could appreciate the thrills all over again. "This aggression will not stand, man....."
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

In case anyone was wondering, I'm logged in as Golden Road because someone brought to my attention a 1987 Philly Spectrum concert was dated incorrectly and I posted a comment from my experience which was slated to be removed. I logged in as my new, old, new self only to find that a PM had been sent to that effect. I simply forgot to log out and in as my new, old, new, old self. In case anyone was wondering (I really wasn't trying to fluff the image of this thread....) "Who the fuck are the Knutsens?"
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

laying in bed, I finally remembered this movie, the counterfit money movie. I was going nuts, kind of confusing the title in my mind with Less Than Zero, which is another really cool movie (but a much better book) by the by... glad to see, GRTUD, you are back to your old self... bite the bullit on that one, if you would. peace.
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

In no particular order...A Perfect World, Shawshank Redemption, Green Mile, Apocalapse Now(of course), any Stanley Kubrick, any John Belushi, Caddyshack, The Hustler, Requeim for a Heavyweight, Easy Rider, Vanishing Point.
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

less than zero the movie was really bad but the book was something out of left field. bret easton ellis's writing style is something that must be taken with a grain of sugar...american psycho was a twisted book and a decent movie...dawg, do you like the apocalypse redux? i think that some of the added scenes really improve an already great film...is anyone a michael mann fan here?
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

I wouldn't say the movie Less Than Zero was 'bad' I dug it, I dug it a whole lot more than American Psyco the film, but I loved that book. but what film was ever better than the book?? I know I might get some shit for this, but Da Vinci Code the film was 'better' in so far as easier to follow... and faster to the punch. that said, the times that I read it, twice, I really really drunk both times... and jet lagged. I remember reading it in Prague; drinking real Budweiser beer and in Cambodia drinking Angkor beer... I have liked M. Mann ever since Miami Vice the TV show, Heat was pretty cool, did you know he wrote some of the Starsky and Hutch episodes... and I think some of the Dan Tanna Vegas! shows. Apoc Now the directors cut was cool, not that many extra scenes as I remember... back to this: what film was ever better than the book??
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

Apoc Redux is cool, I like it, it didn't take anything away from the original I always watch deleted scenes on movie DVD's and more often than not I think they should have put them in, it certainly would make you feel like you got your moneys worth at the theater if the movie was 20 minutes longer.
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

Two that I can think of. 2001 - A Space Odyssey and MASH. Do I contradict myself? Very well then I contradict myself, (I am large, I contain multitudes.) Walt Whitman-Song of Myself
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

I know I'll get MAJOR shit for this but, I liked "Fellowship of the Rings" better as a movie than book. To me the book was drowning in descriptive adjectives and micro textures narratives. I know, I know, it was amazing but to me, BORING as well. I've had insomnia for years and when I was in high school, I used to read the first chapter when I couldn't sleep. Made Hemmingway seem like a casual observer. The Dude Abides!
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

MAJOR SHIT for GRTUD. The Fellowship books were an amazing long term detailed epic adventure and built a fantasy world with all those great characters. The trilogy wasgroundbreaking. I enjoyed the movies but thought they relied too much on constant adrenaline highs and violence. Do I contradict myself? Very well then I contradict myself, (I am large, I contain multitudes.) Walt Whitman-Song of Myself
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

I happen to like constant adrenaline highs, with donuts preferably (but I'm with ya' on the violence). Just typing the original post was a pure rush! I'm working on one to piss all the Star Wars people off next. This aggression will not stand, man!
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

I've known GRTUD for years! Know him better than he knows himself, infact. With a bit of luck, his life was ruined forever. Always thinking that just behind some narrow door in all of his favorite bars, men in red woolen shirts are getting incredible kicks from things he'll never know. He's been ranting for years about such nonsense. Bobby's bands are boring, Lord of the Rings book was boring, etc., etc. I remember thinking 'Jesus, what a terrible thing to lay on someone with a head full of acid'. Hal, you're dead on with your interpertation of The Rings Trilogy being a total psychedelic journey into the psyche of the "civilized human mind". No movie could do it justice in less than 4 hours. GRTUD I'm warning you! No goddamn posts about Star Wars unless it's more honorable than this "Rings" shite, for fuck sake! If you so much as utter "Space Balls" so help me.......don't tell me these things. Not now man. "That poor fool! Wait till he sees those goddamn bats!"
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

Golden Road, the enlightening thing about it is that both you and GRTUD likeI to bowl, drive around......and have the occasional acid flashback. Whose are better? That may be the key. I don't not want to cncourage or unleash this Star Wars beast you speak of. Do I contradict myself? Very well then I contradict myself, (I am large, I contain multitudes.) Walt Whitman-Song of Myself
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

Star Wars (older stuff) was boring... original 1977 genre I mean. except for Return of the Jedi. I never saw any of the new stuff. go on, shovel on the shit. I am an original series Star TREK fan. that series rules. I never watched more than 10 minutes of the next generation... so what, I am a purist. Here is an analogy test; Golden Road is to Next Generation as GRTUD is to: a) Space Balls b) Star Trek (with Bill Shatner) c) Killer Klowns from Outer Space d) Space Cowboys answers must be in the form of a question. peace. ( -;
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

2001... also... even though the book was excellent... and even though king didn't like the original, but instead went on to make a LAME remake... "the (kubrick) shining".
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

Here are two that I think are a tie, both equally good. Blade Runner and the book Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick from which it was adapted. Also Clockwork Orange a tie, I remember it being a difficult read because of many words that were made up for that world, but in a way that was kind of cool. Two of my favorite movies. And I told GRTUD that Lord of the Rings movies were too violent? I still stand on what I stand on. See quote below. Do I contradict myself? Very well then I contradict myself, (I am large, I contain multitudes.) Walt Whitman-Song of Myself
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

300Pans Labyrinth Transformers The new Harry Potter Shrek 3 Saw II and III The Simpsons .......a few movies I'd like to see made.... The Hobbit - Directed by Peter Jackson Halo Blade 4 - or/and a continuation of Blade The Series
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

They could make you very happy...
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

?????Killer Klowns from Outer Space?!?!?!?!?!?!? Most definitely! "Bazooko's Circus is what the whole hep world would be doing Saturday nights if the Nazis had won the war. This was the Sixth Reich."
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

You're not wrong, you're just an asshole! And the analogy thing is all wrong too, man. What the fuck are talking about? What is, Star Trek (w/Shatner)? That's the correct answer! Just calm down, man. "All the Dude ever wanted was his rug back."
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

....you are. Oh and in the tie category, I'd have to say, "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas" or The Vegas Book, as it was often referred. Interesting that we are here discussing two books I really never thought would become movies (Fellowship of the Rings and Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas) because I just couldn't picture in my mind how it would come about. The Vegas movie had all kind of social / cultural baggage to drag across a country's mindset that was shifting faster than presidential canidate's stand on gay marriage and tax cuts. I was surprised that it wasn't a crime just to buy tickets! This irrational fear of addiction is very ironic considering the ape that's now on the monkey's back. One Ring to rule them all..... "All energy flows according to the whims of the Great Magnet. What a fool I was to defy him."
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

GRTUD,correct in the analogy. Golden Road, you got a split personality or something?? just when you think you have a person figured out, they go ahead and do something confusing, and illogical!! ( -:
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

That guy's a freak! What's all that crap about Vietnam? What does anything have to do with Vietnam? The Dude Abides!
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

Spock: I love you, however, I hate you. Alice 210: But I am identical in every way with Alice 27! Spock: Exactly. That is exactly why I hate you, because you are identical. (Both the androids slump over in confusion) Spock: Fascinating. Kirk: Is there anyone on this ship who even remotely looks like Satan? Spock: I am not aware of anyone who fits that description, Captain. Kirk: No, Mr. Spock, I didn't think you would be. Kirk: The boundary layer between what and what? Spock: Between where we were and where we are. Kirk: Are you trying to be funny, Mr. Spock? Spock: It would never occur to me, Captain. ( -:
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

Golden Road, did you decide you didn't "bowl, drive around......and have the occasional acid flashback." since GRTUD does the same? The Fear and Loathing movie was a real trip, watched it the same night as Naked Lunch. That really twisted my mind. Like a psychedelic Creature Feature. I invite you to try it some time. I saw Hunter Thompson speak/spew/smoke/drink back in the day at the University of Iowa. We spoke for a short period. I cannot reveal what we discussed. This site may be monitored. He autographed a dollar bill for me. I still have it. This Golden Road/GRTUD assemblage is messing with my mind Calling ground control. Where is the light at the end of the tunnel? Where is the lost chord? Do I contradict myself? Very well then I contradict myself, (I am large, I contain multitudes.) Walt Whitman-Song of Myself
user picture

Member for

11 years 5 months
Permalink

That's what you have for sure, Hal R......all I can say is, WOW! I'm sure you will treasure the experience with HST. He was a damn fine American, as well a (real) Dr. of Journalism (unlike our evil friend, Golden Road - or should I say, "Fiend"). He actually means well, I've known him for as long as I can remember - quite harmless in fact. We've been through quite a lot of interesting experiences together. I can honestly say, he was there when no other dared venture with me. I'm not sure what he's angling at these daze but I'm sure we'll just have to stay tuned to find out...... CC Joe, weren't those Star Trek scripts awesome! I mean the transcendental quality spilling out, all over prime time America! It doesn't get any better than that, man. We should ask for a "TV" sub-section to this thread (or just make one right now). The Dude Abides!