Grateful Dead

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Hal R's picture
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Joined: Jun 13 2007
more words

Cosmicbadger, glad to share.Good to see you and Tigerlilly again. Right now I am reading Sit Down and Shut Up: Punk Rock Commentaries on Buddha, God, Truth, Sex, Death and Dogen's Treasury of The Right Dharma Eye. Dogen is one of the greatest writers in Zen and this book examines his work from a modern perspective.

Also rereading some classics slowly over the past months; Walden and other writings by Henry David Thoreau, A Sand County Almanac by Aldo Leopold and Leaves of Grass and Other Writings by Walt Whitman. All three of these very important to me over the years. But it is not all serious as I am also reading t.c. boyle - stories.

If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear to man as it is, infinite.
Wiliam Blake

TigerLilly's picture
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Joined: Jul 2 2007
And how 'bout

If someone else wishes it, Badger? Like me? I would like to read "an excellent paragraph on the modern usage of her beloved f-word". :-)
**********************************
Don't part with your illusions. When they are gone, you will still exist, but you have ceased to live.
Samuel Clemens

cosmicbadger's picture
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got it in one

easy for fans of Van the Man I suppose

'I went home and read my Christmas Humphreys book on Zen, Curiosity Killed the Cat, Kerouac's Dharma Bums and on the Road' From Cleaning Windows on Beautiful Vision reached 41 in the UK singles charts.

Van was always touring the UK in the 80's , sometimes he was grumpy and really awful, and sometimes he just tore the place down. Glastonbury Festival 1982 with my 3 month old son in my arms and Van and the Band in full swing in the Vale of Avalon...what a time

to see Van singing 'Cleaning WIndows' in 1982 go here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2QiZgl7jQxo

As for literature, I'm reading Tom Wolfe's 'I am Charlotte Simmons' at the moment, an entertaining and scathing indictment of modern US Ivy League College life. For a foreigner it's like reading an anthropological study from another planet, full of unfathomable cultural references....if it's really like that I wouldn't spend my life's savings sending my kids there I can tell you

For izzie's benefit it does have an excellent paragraph on the modern usage of her beloved f-word...I shall copy it if she wishes

marye's picture
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Joined: May 26 2007
Christmas Humphreys

well, I dunno about the UK charts, but Van's "Cleaning Windows," which is one of my all-time favorites, mentions it as something the narrator's reading in between the fenestral labors.

cosmicbadger's picture
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Joined: Jun 13 2007
thanks to Hal

wow I just found my way back here and read Hal's comprehensive spiritual reading list! So kind of you to share that with us. I read Christmas Humphreys long long ago have had and loved the Paul Reps since an old hippie in the hills turned me on to it 30 years ago, but much is new and I will make some selections for my Christmas wish list.

So here's a quiz question

Which UK chart single from way back mentions Christmas Humphreys?

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Joined: Nov 6 2007
Everybody I Shot Is Dead book features Jerry Garcia too!

Sorry I forgot to post that amazingly important tidbit.

You can get the book on Amazon.com or through her website at: www.cheshercat.com.

The blog about the book is at: www.everybodyishotisdead.blogspot.com.

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Joined: Nov 6 2007
Everybody I Shot Is Dead book features Keith Godchaux

Hey guys,

Wanted to make the boards aware of an amazing coffee table photo book by Deborah Chesher that pays tribute to 48 musicians she shot in Vancouver and LA b/w 74-79 who have since passed away. Keith Godchaux is one of the musicians featured in the book. It shows never before see photos and includes Deborah's own behind the scenes memories.

You can get the book on Amazon.com or through her website at: www.cheshercat.com.

The blog about the book is at: www.everybodyishotisdead.blogspot.com.

Would love to hear what anyone thinks of the book as well - getting great response this week as the Vancouver gallery show just happened on Sat. You can see 90 prints if in Vancouver at the OH MY GODARD GALLERY, LA, Austin, etc...shows coming soon!

Hal R's picture
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Joined: Jun 13 2007
An answer to the cosmicbadger question - part 2

More on this.
You asked me "who would you say have been Watts' successors in popularizing Buddhism, Zen and the Tao? Any recommendations?"

The major history on the opening of the west to Buddhism is "How the Swans Came to the Lake" by Rick Fields and is a very nice read.

The two major figures internationally are of course the Dalai Lama and Thich Nhat Hanh, both of whom have many books out.

A good one by Thich Nhat Hanh about the Life of the Buddha and his teachings is the story told by a fictionalized buffalo boy in "Old Path White Clouds".

My favorite introductory books to Buddhism are "The Heart of Buddha's Teachings" by Thich Nhat Hanh, "What the Buddha Taught" by Walpola Rahula and "Light on Enlightenment" by Christopher Titmuss. An easy intro is the comic style Introducing Buddha by Jane Hope and Baron Van Loon.

As an introduction to Zen my first choice would be “Taking the Path of Zen” by Robert Aitken, along with the” Zen Flesh, Zen Bones” and “Zen Mind, Beginners Mind”.
One that covers many of the facets of Zen and of Zen in the arts is The World of Zen by Nancy Wilson Ross.

Can't forget Chogyam Trungpa the great and controversial Tibetan teacher. You could start with his The Essential Chogyam Trungpa".

There are so many more incredible teachers and books and I want to acknowledge and thank them all here even though I can't mention them.

If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear to man as it is, infinite.
Wiliam Blake

Hal R's picture
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Joined: Jun 13 2007
An answer to the cosmicbadger question

You asked me "who would you say have been Watts' successors in popularizing Buddhism, Zen and the Tao? Any recommendations?"

A huge question for me because there is so much on this flowering of Buddhism, Zen and the Tao over the past 50 years. Kind of like someone asking us to recommend a book about the environment.

Watts and his contemporary Christmas Humphreys did a lot to open the doors for the west to Buddhism. D.T. Suzuki wrote volumes on Zen and translated and was very important and an influence on Watts and Humphreys.

I would say that the next wave after them were the teachers that came to the U.S. and to Europe and the folks that studied in Asia, mainly Japan at first. In Zen, Shunryu Suzuki founded Zen Center in San Francisco and wrote, "Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind" which was very influential. Also very important in U.S. were Taizan Maezumi Roshi in Los Angeles and
Katagari Roshi in Minneapolis, both of whom have books that are out and I relish. These three were all Zen priests from Japan.

Then of course there was Gary Snyder, the central figure in Jack Kerouac's the Dharma Bums. Many of the beats were involved at some time either directly or indirectly in studying, practicing and popularizing Zen and/or Buddhism. Snyder and Ginsberg lived it.

Another important book was Zen Flesh, Zen Bones by Paul Reps which had short versions of many classic Zen tales and also Koans which are a type of Zen riddle to open your mind beyond rational thought.

Then there were the first American students to become Zen teachers or priests and to write. The earliest in the 60's was Phillip Kapleau and his "Three Pillars of Zen". Also Robert Aitken has many works out and is my main teacher’s teacher. I highly recommend anything by him.

End of part 1

If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear to man as it is, infinite.
Wiliam Blake

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Joined: Jun 5 2007
Thanks!

Thanks so much for the interest in "Slipknot". Everyone in the GD community has been wonderfully supportive, starting with Alan Trist who actually called me at home and chatted with me at length about the project after I had timidly contacted him. (Ice Nine allowed the limited and reasonable use of the lyrics. Very indebted for that.) Both David Gans and John Henrikson, too, have been gracious. Sometime in the next couple of months there will be some "Slipknot" coverage on their shows and/or blogs. But however "well" the book does, for me the best part is it offers some small insight into what it means to have embraced the Dead ethos then struggle to bring it into our daily lives. It's nice to have some artistic expression of that feeling.

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