Grateful Dead

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Joined: Jun 5 2007
New mystery novel with GD twist

New novel, "Slipknot," features a county sheriff who is also a Deadhead. He quotes GD lyrics throughout, while solving the murder of an ecologist. Dennis McNally wrote one of the cover blurbs: “A hardcore Deadhead county sheriff is my idea of good law enforcement. Slipknot happens to be a darned good mystery where the Grateful Dead stuff is central and real.” Officially out Nov. 1st.

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Joined: Jun 11 2007
Tiger In A Trance

Anybody read this one by Max Ludington? A sort of road novel about the darker side of freedom and growing up. A pretty powerful statement by Ludington.

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Joined: Jun 5 2007
Out of my depth here

I have not read a lot of the books mentioned here, the classics got burned out of me at school, not much disecting of Dickens and Shakespeare.
I have always read a lot but very different books, when i was at school i would rather read Scifi than the stuff they tried to force on us.
Living in Spain i have not even read Don Quixote.
I like most of Kesey's stuff, i even have signed copies of Sailor Song and Further enquiry from when the bus came to my home town
Apart from that my reading tends towards fantasy now

Bob

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Spanish Jam

cosmicbadger's picture
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Joined: Jun 13 2007
Alan Watts

..interesting Hal. Sad too about Watts' demise. Given your comments and your personal studies who would you say have been Watts' successors in popularisng Buddhism, Zen and the Tao? Any recommendations?

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Joined: Jun 13 2007
Alan Watts

Classical Dead
Cosmicbadger - I read lots of Alan Watts when I was in my late teens and early 20's. He served as my introduction to Buddhism, Zen and the Tao which I have continued to explore throughout my life. Once in a while I will reread his essays but I find some of his work a bit naive and his own painting of Buddhism, Zen and the Tao are a bit off from what I feel they are and have found in my studies. He did not do a great amount of meditation so it is difficult for me to see him as a master but his role as a popularizer was key. I really loved his critiques of society and he helped me see that there were other ways to view the world and to live.

Read a biography about him recently, Zen Effects The Life of Alan Watts by Monica Furlong.
So sad that he was victim of his own abuse of alcohol

We named our 40 acres of mountain property Cloud Hidden after his book Cloud Hidden, Whereabouts Unknown. That is also the title of a great Van Morrison song dedicated to Alan Watts.

Thank you Alan Watts for opening many doors for me.

If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear to man as it is, infinite.
Wiliam Blake

Hal R's picture
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Joined: Jun 13 2007
A Poem by Alice Walker

A friend just sent me a copy of the Alice Walker poem, Be Nobody's Darling. I think it applies to many of us here. Google: "Xkot: Be Nobody's Darling, a poem by Alice Walker" and enjoy.

If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear to man as it is, infinite.
Wiliam Blake

cosmicbadger's picture
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Joined: Jun 13 2007
Recent reads

Thought I’d visit some other forums (fora?) in a more serious mood (..ish)

I will certainly seek out the Book Thief. If like ‘em beautiful but bleak, try ‘Snow’ by Turkish Nobel Prize Winner Orhan Pamuk. I was working in Turkey a lot earlier this year and bought it to learn a bit about the country and its culture. If you want to know what its like to be an innocent standing in the cross fire of left and right, religious and secular, democracy and dictatorship it’s the one for you!! I must say though that (for an outsider at least) Turkey is far far more fun than Pamuk suggests.

‘Collapse’ by Jared Diamond is enlightening stuff, but I find him an annoyingly repetitive writer at times

In the spirit of Douglas Adams, Rob Grant’s ‘Incompetence’ is a real laugh. It is a detective story set in a world where, according to Article 13199 of the Pan-European Constitution: ‘No person shall be prejudiced from employment in any capacity, at any level, by reason of age, race, creed or incompitence’

…does anyone else still read Alan Watts? A genius (for me) who tried to reconcile Zen, Acid, Beat and the realities of the Western Culture that shape so much our lives…..

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Joined: Jul 2 2007
The Book Thief

By Markus Zuzsak. Anybody out there read that one? Just finished it, and is the most amazingly awful book that I have read in a long time. I mean awful, not because is poorly written (au contraire-is brilliant) but in that the subject matter is so rough and bleak. The story is narrated by Death, and is told in a completely unique style of prose. Is set in WWII Nazi Germany, and is about how a little girl learns to love literature, despite her world crumbleing around her. I am completely blown away, and can highly recommend this book.

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Joined: Jun 14 2007
other literature

skye1965 ive recently read a book callled tiger in a trance a very compeling journey of this kids grateful dead experience i recomend it to any dead head

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Joined: Jun 9 2007
MR. NICE

Mr. Nice, by Howard Marks

www.howardmarks.co.uk

The hilarious true tale of Howard Marks, the most notorious hashish smuggler in history.
A great read. You'll laugh your ass off!

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