• 35 replies
    marye
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    May 26, 2007
    Over in the Dave's Picks 12 thread, there's a discussion going on about people's first concerts, with some great stories attached. Rolling Stones! KISS! Yanni! And yet, here we all are. This got me to thinking that there were probably equally great stories attached to shows we're still bummed about missing--whether because we weren't born yet or just couldn't make it at the time. These days there are many recordings of all kinds of live performances; which ones make you wish you'd been there? Dead shows, not Dead shows. Any era whose music you like...

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  • October 26, 2016 - 5:17pm
    Anttheknee
    Joined:
    June 7, 2007
    Missed a Jazz Great
    I had tickets to see Miles Davis at Jones Beach, NY in 1991 but Miles didn't make the show due to illness. A few weeks later he passed away and I never got to see him live.
  • October 18, 2016 - 2:41pm
    Morning Dew Train
    Joined:
    October 16, 2016
    I missed seeing the last "Wheel" in Seattle...
    ...to see Page & Plant. The Dead played 3 shows in Seattle in 1995 on the final tour. I saw the first and last shows, but missed the middle show to see Page & Plant in the Tacoma Dome. I also missed the "Mighty Quinn" encore that night... :(
  • October 14, 2016 - 12:00pm
    Chris killer
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    August 30, 2015
    ..? Dicks picks 20
    I'm so i'm so psyched for dicks picks 20 I don't care what it is , I'm just happy to get another recording of the Grateful Dead ,in HDCD , it just makes a sunny day , or a rainy day , sunnier , Love ☮. Chrispy
  • October 14, 2016 - 11:51am
    Chris killer
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    August 30, 2015
    I remember Bill Graham memorial my first weekend in California
    I was driving to California from Connecticut moving to squad Valley in Tahoe city, I was driving across the continental divide when the tape that I was listening to screwed up . Since I was on the continental divide I figured I could get a radio station listening to the radio I heard that Bill Graham was killed in a helicopter crash in California made me furious what a waste it made me shed a tear knowing how instrumental Bill Graham was with so many musicians. All I could think of was Jimmy Buffett saying as I was driving crossed the continental divide the David John Wayne died the irony was incredible, just that my tape deck would've screwed up at that time to hear that broadcast , Anyway that first weekend I was in California the Dead were playing in Oakland I couldn't make it I am just drove across the country . As I remember hearing about the memorial concert at the polo field is the next weekend I said I had to go even though I just wet myself it's the day I'll never forget so many bands such a beautiful day What a shame that such a tragedy had to Spooner such a beautiful memorial. Best to you and yours. Chris
  • October 14, 2016 - 5:40am
    dwlemen
    Joined:
    June 23, 2007
    Too many to list!
    This would take forever, I think. Mostly, just about any show I wasn't at, I wish I was. A few of the big ones... The Dead at Deer Ck in 89. That was my first invite to a Dead show and I didn't go. Another offer didn't come around again until 95 (night 2 of course). Though, had I fully gotten on the bus in 89, things would have likely been a lot different for me now. The other big one was FTW. I tried getting tix from all the usual channels but was denied. My wife was reluctantly willing to go with, if I had tix but would not just drive to Chicago in hopes of finding some. So, I didn't go. A few other "honorable mentions" would be the Police (Synchronicity tour), Soundgarden (Louder Than Love tour... did see them later), Van Halen (1984 tour). And, this morning, I wish I would have just gone to see Chris Robinson last night! peace, -Dave
  • September 29, 2016 - 6:55am
    hockey_john
    Joined:
    August 25, 2012
    Very 1st
    The very 1st show I ever attended was Elton John and Kiki Dee at Schaefer Stadium now know as Gillette Stadium and before that was Sullivan Stadium. Sullivan Stadium is the actual venue. I was in attendance with my older sister who had an extra ticket last minute so it was decided that I was the one who should go to the concert. Yes I was there and yes I remember parts of it but not enough to call it a great time. Only because I was to young to know everything going on there. I remember it was July 4th and Elton came out wearing a Uncle Sam type of outfit. Back in the days when he wore flamboyant outfits every night. Thing that stands out most in my memory was this girl near us decided to rip off her top and dance all night that way. I was completely shocked that anyone would be so bold. In time now looking back this was a common thing later in life at Telluride and the Oregon shows I attended this was common. topless woman dancing meant nothing more to me then the fact that we in area where freedom was so easily displayed. Now so many years later I found a copy of that Elton show online and am rather glad to hear what I saw but missed if that can even make sense
  • October 29, 2014 - 8:49am
    marye
    Joined:
    May 26, 2007
    that one didn't get away for me
    I was there, with a prototype Mac laptop... It was in fact a stunner on many levels. What got me was not so much "Ohio" as "Long May You Run." Not a dry eye in the place. I'm so sorry you missed it, but glad it was on the radio anyway.
  • October 29, 2014 - 3:45am
    Oxford 88
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    Laughter Love and Music
    I worked at a hotel in the Napa Valley in the early '90s and caught many great Bay Area shows through the years. The power dimmed in the kitchen the night Bill Graham's helicopter crashed into the power lines. I can't say we ever really met, but I did have quite a bit of contact with Bill at various venues over the years. The last time I saw him was at Squaw Valley for a great weekend of Jerry earlier in '91. Bill was as happy as could be bouncing around on the mountainside, as relaxed as I had ever seen him. Later, I caught 3 of the 4 Oakland shows including the Halloween show with Ken Kesey spouting E.E. Cummings. It was a pretty heady week. When the memorial concert was announced, I knew I was doomed. I was responsible for a major event that day and there was no way out. My wife and a bunch of friends left for Golden Gate Park and I headed to the kitchen. I spent most of the concert in a small banquet kitchen prepping and listening to the show on the radio. So many amazing performers. I was openly weeping listening to CSNY sing Ohio and I really lost it when John Fogerty belted out CCR with the boys. My prep cooks could not understand what all the fuss was about; it was only music, right? At least I got to hear the show, but it was nothing like what everyone raved about late into the night.
  • October 28, 2014 - 8:18pm
    Dschian
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    The show(s) that got away
    One Dead, and sorely missed; one not, and missed but not regretted: First of all, I'm not gonna pine for all the Dead shows I was too young to see. I feel fortunate just to have seen them a bunch during the early-mid 80s, when I feel they still had some real spark left, and some really awesome nights; and to have access to all the great shows (first on tape, then online, and now also in the dead.net sets). BUT- 6-30-85, Merriweather Post Pavilion, in Maryland- the second set in particular- that incendiary Shakedown (still the best ever, in my opinion), that rare (for that era) Cryptical>Drums> Space >Other One!, really all of it... I just narrowly missed, due to car trouble on the way home from Saratoga (6-27-85). My ancient volkswagen rabbit broke down, and I was stranded for a week or so, until it got repaired. In the meantime, my friends, at some distance away due to circumstances, had to go down to MD without me. I'm sure had I gone I'd consider it one of my top few shows- so- c'est la vie! The non-Dead- U2 at Madison Square Garden, 4-1-85. I was fairly into them during their early career (let's not talk about most of what came later), and would dearly have loved to have seen them then- and had a ticket for that night (and never have since seen them). But here's the thing- even though I missed them because I was seeing the Dead in Portland that night, and THAT show was lame (again, IMHO- though I think Weir actually dissed it in some interview years ago), you gotta pay to play- and the night before, on 3/31, also in Portland, I attended a GREAT Dead show (one of my all-time favorites attended), and came out to a beautiful snow storm. So of course I was gonna stick around for night two. Anyway- despite the strong early albums- how good could U2 have been live? Though I didn't imagine it at the time, in retrospect I think it would just have been a theatrical performance. That's not what I go to hear... Oh, and one other- 9/21/13- NY Philharmonic at Avery Fisher Hall in NYC playing the full soundtrack of 2001 (I particularly love Ligeti's work on that) as accompaniment to the film being screened. I stayed home that night to spend more time with my four year-old daughter and my wife, whom I hadn't seen much lately. While I know I made a good choice under the circumstances, I doubt I'll ever get that particular musical opportunity again.
  • October 28, 2014 - 10:01am
    jgrandt11
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    The One That Got Away......
    The show I regret not being able to see, was one that disappeared into space, was never created and keeps me wondering......What might have been? Confused? The show I'm referring to is the one 2 night stop, in the Midwest, in which I choose to spend my money on the second night (was there for the first night, but couldn't afford both nights). Some of you might have been there and some of you might have even partaken in what was a horrific and very disappointing scene from where I was. I happened to be right outside the venue, listening to the music, and witnessing people running up a hill and over a fence to try and see the show. A show which they didn't have tickets for, like myself, but somehow felt they should be allowed in, by any means. I am talking about the second night of Deer Creek, the show the band cancelled due to unruly, rude, and stupid people. I don't say fans, I say people, people who didn't have a clue about what the Grateful Dead were about. The tear gas, helicopters, and police presence that night all but lead me to believe that the band wouldn't play the following night, and when I showed up the next day, the gates were closed. So that is my one "that got away". It makes me upset not to have seen this show, that second night at Deer Creek, knowing that I had paid for a ticket and should have enjoyed the experience. What would they have played? Would it have been what I expected or predicted with my fellow travelers the night before or would it have been a mind-blowing, totally unpredictable, unearthly experience that would have had me smiling to this very day? The comfort I have, the one thing I tell myself that makes me smile about that whole injustice brought upon us that night, is that the show was and will always be LEGENDARY for me. This night that got away is what I want it to be and I put together my own set lists and listen to it whenever I like . It is a blow the doors off my house rockin' night, a life changing outer cosmos trek, or a cowboy ride in the West. This night that I never saw is mine, and depending on my mood, might just be the best Grateful Dead concert I ever saw. Or at least that's what I tell myself.
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Over in the Dave's Picks 12 thread, there's a discussion going on about people's first concerts, with some great stories attached. Rolling Stones! KISS! Yanni! And yet, here we all are. This got me to thinking that there were probably equally great stories attached to shows we're still bummed about missing--whether because we weren't born yet or just couldn't make it at the time. These days there are many recordings of all kinds of live performances; which ones make you wish you'd been there? Dead shows, not Dead shows. Any era whose music you like...
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Dead show: Probably Anchorage 6/21/80. From the tapes, incredible. My first show wasn't till the end of that year. Non-Dead show: Benny Goodman at Carnegie Hall, 1938. While on the road to Red Rocks, Telluride etc. in 1987, I got some cheesy anthology cassette in a truck stop, and it turned out to have a version of "One o'Clock Jump" that's just a stunner, even on the really hissy tape. I finally tracked it down to this show, which currently exists in a nice release with an intro by Benny himself. I was initially surprised that it was played in such a formal setting, because it's hard to imagine NOT dancing to it till you dropped.
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Grateful Dead 1/5/79, 1st non Dead show, Yes, 9/12/80. Last Dead show 6/21/95, Albany, N.Y. Most recent show 9/13/14, King Crimson, Verizon Hall, Philadelphia, PA., the encore was Larks Tongues In Aspic my 1st live version. The show I regret missing is 12/1/79, Stanley Theater, Pittsburgh, PA I had a ticket, just couldn't get transportation to Pittsburgh. The show I had the most fun at is 3/17/93, Cap Center, Landover, MD. HAPPY SUNDAY, DEADLAND!!!!
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In the category of shows I missed that are Fantasy missed shows because there was no way I was going to be there (like too young or not born yet) would be the Fillmore east February 70 run. To get to see '70 dead, in that environment, at that time, with the Allmans, and Green, and other folks - I'd be more than happy with that choice if I could go back and be there. Was never going to happen, I was 6 years old in another country. In the category of shows I missed, but could have been there, 3/28/85. That year, my brother and some friends went to that run, while I decided to use the same time-off and funds to go the Texas shows later in the year (Houston and manor downs) so that I could finally get some old college friends to see the GD who never had. Both were lackluster shows, although a good time was had by all. They would never have converted anyone to the "cult of the Grateful Dead" as my best friend and roommate from college worded my attempts to get him into the GD. On the other hand, I understand the Nassau run was very special, opening the 28th with Truckin' into Smokestack into High Time and beyond song selection it was evidently one of THOSE shows (which was never really dependent on song selection anyway.).
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Interesting you should mention this show, Marye. A few years ago, following my mother's passing, my father bid me take what I wanted from their prodigious vinyl collection, which included the Columbia releases (vols. 1 & 2) of that famed Carnegie performance (sans encores). I can only imagine that one or both purchased these during the mid-late '60s while in their waning teen years, as their commitments to education and careers intensified considerably thereafter. And you're right, by what I've read, the idea of playing jazz at this fortress of staid Yankee cultural sensibilities was indeed revolutionary. Anyway, for other curious novices like myself who'll never venture very far into exploration of this cross-over genre (swing/jazz), Marye's suggestion is worth checking out (think of it as the Barton Hall of Big Band shows!) for not only its recognized landmark historical significance, but at least a passing introduction to the remarkable group play of legendary greats like Harry James, Count Basie, Lionel Hampton, Gene Krupa, and BG himself. Here's one of my favorites from the night: /k Edit: From the intro - "...we started to jam, that is, to fake a little bit about the tune, and continued adding to it a bit every night; and after playing for about two or three years [finally achieved the version played at this show]"...sound familiar DeadHeads? :)))
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I wasn't thinking along those lines, but that would have been great. The Sing Sing Sing for the ages. I've heard stories about how at the beginning of the show, Krupa thought they were all stiff and nervous, and just suddenly went OFF hitting everything he had as loud as he could, not to wake up the audience, but to wake up the band. Evidently, it worked. They were nervous because Carnegie had never hosted a jazz band, it was a high class tuxedo set kind of thing. One of the band described it as feeling like being a whore at the Waldorf Astoria. Once Krupa got them shaken up a little, everything was aces from there. Another show I wish I could have seen was one of the 1955 Maria Callas Norma's or Traviata's. Actually I'd die happy if I could have seen her in anything. And, finally, how about the first Beethoven 9th which he conducted (sort of, the players were instructed to ignore him and pay attention to the concertmaster) himself.
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Had tickets to all 3 Winterland shows 11/73. Gave them to a friend because I had to study for a test on Monday. Not a day goes by...
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I doubt there's a recording of it, but also on my short list would be Verdi conducting the premiere, if conduct he did. I do like Verdi, and there are so many great songs in that one. Tangent: A great moment experienced thanks to the miracle of iTunes--a Pavarotti-and-Friends grand finale of the whole ensemble each taking a verse of "libiamo ne' lieti calici." The ensemble included, by design, a pretty wide range of genres, but leaned heavily to people with opera-quality voices. But as it happened, the person who got to follow Luciano himself was--Bryan Adams, who not in ten thousand years would have the voice (or the Italian, probably) to do it. But he does his best with it anyway, and it's one of the most lovable moments in the history of music.
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I don't think Verdi conducted his works (or anybody's), but at least you can get recordings of Arturo Toscanini conducting some of his works. Toscanini played cello in the premiere of Otello and I believe also met and got to know Verdi a little. He also conducted the premieres of Puccini's La Boheme, Leoncavallo's Pagliacci, and many other premiers. Historically, it's cool to be able to hear him perform these works. Unfortunately, I really don't like his approach to music and conducting and even in "historical" performances I prefer others. I don't know if you know about the controversies (musical, not all the other b.s.) about Maria Callas' performances. A lot of opera 'snobs' look down at her relative to other sopranos in similar repertoire. The main issue is that she doesn't have a traditionally beautiful voice at all. It can be harsh, piercing, and has a metallic feel to it. The issue, much like with GD music, is that you really need to listen from a different perspective. The best way I can describe it is that she turned that "ugly" voice into the most expressive instrument I've ever heard in my life. And so, what she does with it, as a means of communication, communicating directly from the soul, is simply unbelievable and beautiful in a much more profound sense then hearing a pretty voice sing great arias. It's actually in the moments in between "arias" that her most amazing moments occur. After listening to her obsessively over a long period of time, it got to the point where operas without her were just plain boring. I got over it, especially after I developed a Wagner addiction, and she doesn't sing those (except for a small role once in Parsifal - in Italian!) One last thing on Traviata - she only recorded the opera once in the studio (contract issues followed by timing issues), and I still prefer it to other studio performances just because of her. But, just like GD, bootlegs of live performances were key (they're still occasionally finding ones unknown to have existed). EMI has released some of them, but I don't think all. In any case, my favorite is maybe the last one that there is a recording of, at Covent Garden on 6-20-58. Her voice has lost much of the strength of earlier years, has now become inconsistent, is not completely in control at the top - it's almost just a wisp at times relative to in earlier years. She gets through some of the coloratura stuff early in the opera by the skin of her teeth so to speak. But her artistry, which was always genius-level-unbelievable-can-you-believe-how-she-can-make-you-feel, has by this point reached just - well reached as high as art can go. It really just has to be heard with ears and soul and heart ready to hear beyond the physical sound of her voice. GET THIS RECORDING.
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I stumbled onto his version with Jan Peerce et al some years ago, and reading the liner notes realized that Toscanini KNEW Verdi, etc. What I have is the dress rehearsal recording, which is apparently notorious for having exhausted the cast so much they were still worn out for the official opening. What's cool about this recording (and startling till you realize what's going on) is that Toscanini's microphone is on, so you hear his various exclamations and directions.
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As it happens, it's her version of Sempre Libera I like best of all the ones I've heard.
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Talking Heads 10/6/83 - Stop Making Sense Tour Bill Monroe - 1993 Grateful Dead Oregon - 1992 (Jerry health problems) Missing these shows eats at me to this day...gotta let it go ;)
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I checked out that link, figured I'd watch a little to see what you were talking about. Couldn't stop watching till it was over. Thanks!
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wjonjd - Glad you enjoyed :). The Talking Heads have always been in my top 5 bands and I am so thankful this video is out there. Sums up a great tour from that time period. Always creative and interesting. For the life of me I don't know how the audience remains seated throughout. Must have been a directive from the producers of the Sessions at West 54th show.
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Since I moved five hours north of Toronto I've missed plenty of concerts that I would have liked to have gone to, but nothing stung more than missing Furthur at the Ottawa Blues Fest 2010. Dead related shows are a rarity in this country and I'm afraid I'll never get the chance again. If I had to pick one concert that I would have loved to see but couldn't because of my age it would probably be any Bob Marley show. If I could only time travel...
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I missed at least 4 Dead shows here in the DFW area. One was at Dallas Memorial Auditorium in 1972 which was right across the street from my place of employment at the time and apparently again in 1973 at the new Dallas Convention Center, an extension of Memorial Auditorium. Another was at Texas Christian University "TCU" Daniel-Meyer Coliseum. I was 20 at the time, it was a Sunday night and I can only imagine what I was doing while this show was going on. I did manage to get a CD of I think half of this show which is the "bonus" disc for Road Trips Vol 3 No. 2 Austin Texas. While I was looking for any history on the Dead playing around these parts, I found a great article from TCU Magazine, about the day the Grateful Dead played TCU. Especially since it was in the aftermath of Jefferson Airplane playing the same venue and causing "turmoil"! I've linked to it, (although I can't get the "link" function to work for me). Hope that's OK...well worth the read! http://www.magazine.tcu.edu/Magazine/Article.aspx?ArticleId=216#comments
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It was sometime after Halloween in 1969. I was 14 and really into rock music. I had been to a few concerts already when some friends told me they were going to buy tickets for New Year's Eve, at The Fillmore East, to see Jimi Hendrix and The Band of Gypsys. I had a real dilemma on my hands because I had a girlfried, or a girl I was hot for, and figured New Year's Eve would be a really good night. I passed on the concert, the girl is long forgotten, and Jimi died in September of 1970 and I never got to see him live. That's one that got away.
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The Stones were playing at JFK in Philly with Foreigner and Peter Tosh.Bob Marley was playing at MSG that night. I thought there was a outside of Chance of the Stones finishing early enough to get in the VW Camper and drive to NYC to catch Bob Marley but I would have had to drop off two of my friends on the way home in NJ to do it. I decided to go to see the Stones. At 17 I was figuring I'd have more chances in the future to see Marley than the Stones so that's the main reason I made that decision along with the fact they were the Stones. Bad Call. I was not in good enough shape to hightail it out Philly between some chemicals and the heat so decided to hang in the parking lot until I felt good enough to drive. Ended up going to college in NC and never had the chance to see Marley. The others I regret were the Dead with Branford at MSG and with Branford at Nassau. When the Dead did the first 9 show run at the Garden I went to 8, took off one for Yom Kippur. The 8 shows were just too much so when they did another 9 shows a couple of years later I just didn't get tickets for the first 3 shows and Branford played the 3rd Show. March 29, 1990. Had 5th row seats with my brother and friends but we just opened a music club in NYC on March 21. My partners and manager were rotating working the door at the time and I was up that night. Someone offered to cover and I turned him down. So missed Branford twice with the Dead. Bummer.
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My wife and I had tickets for the 1986 NYE run at the Oakland Aud. I was working for Marriott at the time and snagged a suite overlooking the water and had charted a sailboat for a day. We had to cancel a couple days before as she was pregnant with our first and suffering from morning sickness and not up for cross country flight. I called Dead Ticketing and explained the situation and the lady who helped me was great. She sent us the money back and put the tixs out for sale at the door. Always wondered who the lucky folks were to get those tickets!!
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How many folks remember Dire Straits the night before Red Rocks in 85? They were on a roll and I wish I would have taken advantage of the many tickets available at the door. The other feasible show that would have been nice was a Johnny Cash night show on the pier in Seattle following a JGB day show at the Seattle Center field...1993? At the time I thought it might be too much but I didn't even have to work the next day...Never did get to see Johnny...Not many regrets overall...
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In Lexington Kentucky at the Kentucky Theatre. Sometime between 1997 and 2001, I think. I had bought tickets. Hell, I bicycled or walked to work past the theatre every day. I decided to go home and take a "disco nap" eat a bite, and change clothes so I'd be comfy for the show. I sit down for a bit, then next thing you know, I wake up and the show, a 20 minute walk away, had maybe 15 minutes left. even if I ran, I'd just get there in time for everybody's popcorn farts in the lobby.
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i am forever bummed that i had a chance to go to watkins glen to see the dead and allman bros.and the band and didn't make it. a very large mistake on my part!
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Forced to visit my grandparents in Florida around spring break in 1970 my fifteen year old imagination was fired up by the news that the Dead were playing a place called Pirates World not far from where I was staying- my high school pals & I had been listening to the Airplane, Big Brother and Quicksilver but the Dead were an unknown quantity to us at the time. Sadly, I broke out with the measles and was forbidden to attend despite my protests and promises to not infect anyone at the show with my disease. Spent two weeks sweating on my acne and measles listening to the AM Top 40 ( Candyman by Sammy Davis Jr.! ) , didn't make it to the Dead show until fall of 1972 in Philadelphia
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My buddies had a ticket for me, and at age 15 I did some thing to piss off my parents, and they wouldn't let me go. Oh the pain!! Lol
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I feel your pain. Way back in '64, I was supposed to get in line at the ticket office with my friends to get tickets for the Beatles at the Hollywood Bowl. But no. The night before, I came down with German measles (the only childhood disease I hadn't had as a smallish kid) and was confined to the house. I was quite sure if I'd been there we would have gotten better tickets, but hey, we were in the door, so I can't really complain. But at the time I was seriously bummed.
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The show I regret not being able to see, was one that disappeared into space, was never created and keeps me wondering......What might have been? Confused? The show I'm referring to is the one 2 night stop, in the Midwest, in which I choose to spend my money on the second night (was there for the first night, but couldn't afford both nights). Some of you might have been there and some of you might have even partaken in what was a horrific and very disappointing scene from where I was. I happened to be right outside the venue, listening to the music, and witnessing people running up a hill and over a fence to try and see the show. A show which they didn't have tickets for, like myself, but somehow felt they should be allowed in, by any means. I am talking about the second night of Deer Creek, the show the band cancelled due to unruly, rude, and stupid people. I don't say fans, I say people, people who didn't have a clue about what the Grateful Dead were about. The tear gas, helicopters, and police presence that night all but lead me to believe that the band wouldn't play the following night, and when I showed up the next day, the gates were closed. So that is my one "that got away". It makes me upset not to have seen this show, that second night at Deer Creek, knowing that I had paid for a ticket and should have enjoyed the experience. What would they have played? Would it have been what I expected or predicted with my fellow travelers the night before or would it have been a mind-blowing, totally unpredictable, unearthly experience that would have had me smiling to this very day? The comfort I have, the one thing I tell myself that makes me smile about that whole injustice brought upon us that night, is that the show was and will always be LEGENDARY for me. This night that got away is what I want it to be and I put together my own set lists and listen to it whenever I like . It is a blow the doors off my house rockin' night, a life changing outer cosmos trek, or a cowboy ride in the West. This night that I never saw is mine, and depending on my mood, might just be the best Grateful Dead concert I ever saw. Or at least that's what I tell myself.
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One Dead, and sorely missed; one not, and missed but not regretted: First of all, I'm not gonna pine for all the Dead shows I was too young to see. I feel fortunate just to have seen them a bunch during the early-mid 80s, when I feel they still had some real spark left, and some really awesome nights; and to have access to all the great shows (first on tape, then online, and now also in the dead.net sets). BUT- 6-30-85, Merriweather Post Pavilion, in Maryland- the second set in particular- that incendiary Shakedown (still the best ever, in my opinion), that rare (for that era) Cryptical>Drums> Space >Other One!, really all of it... I just narrowly missed, due to car trouble on the way home from Saratoga (6-27-85). My ancient volkswagen rabbit broke down, and I was stranded for a week or so, until it got repaired. In the meantime, my friends, at some distance away due to circumstances, had to go down to MD without me. I'm sure had I gone I'd consider it one of my top few shows- so- c'est la vie! The non-Dead- U2 at Madison Square Garden, 4-1-85. I was fairly into them during their early career (let's not talk about most of what came later), and would dearly have loved to have seen them then- and had a ticket for that night (and never have since seen them). But here's the thing- even though I missed them because I was seeing the Dead in Portland that night, and THAT show was lame (again, IMHO- though I think Weir actually dissed it in some interview years ago), you gotta pay to play- and the night before, on 3/31, also in Portland, I attended a GREAT Dead show (one of my all-time favorites attended), and came out to a beautiful snow storm. So of course I was gonna stick around for night two. Anyway- despite the strong early albums- how good could U2 have been live? Though I didn't imagine it at the time, in retrospect I think it would just have been a theatrical performance. That's not what I go to hear... Oh, and one other- 9/21/13- NY Philharmonic at Avery Fisher Hall in NYC playing the full soundtrack of 2001 (I particularly love Ligeti's work on that) as accompaniment to the film being screened. I stayed home that night to spend more time with my four year-old daughter and my wife, whom I hadn't seen much lately. While I know I made a good choice under the circumstances, I doubt I'll ever get that particular musical opportunity again.
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6 years 7 months
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I worked at a hotel in the Napa Valley in the early '90s and caught many great Bay Area shows through the years. The power dimmed in the kitchen the night Bill Graham's helicopter crashed into the power lines. I can't say we ever really met, but I did have quite a bit of contact with Bill at various venues over the years. The last time I saw him was at Squaw Valley for a great weekend of Jerry earlier in '91. Bill was as happy as could be bouncing around on the mountainside, as relaxed as I had ever seen him. Later, I caught 3 of the 4 Oakland shows including the Halloween show with Ken Kesey spouting E.E. Cummings. It was a pretty heady week. When the memorial concert was announced, I knew I was doomed. I was responsible for a major event that day and there was no way out. My wife and a bunch of friends left for Golden Gate Park and I headed to the kitchen. I spent most of the concert in a small banquet kitchen prepping and listening to the show on the radio. So many amazing performers. I was openly weeping listening to CSNY sing Ohio and I really lost it when John Fogerty belted out CCR with the boys. My prep cooks could not understand what all the fuss was about; it was only music, right? At least I got to hear the show, but it was nothing like what everyone raved about late into the night.
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11 years 6 months
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I was there, with a prototype Mac laptop... It was in fact a stunner on many levels. What got me was not so much "Ohio" as "Long May You Run." Not a dry eye in the place. I'm so sorry you missed it, but glad it was on the radio anyway.
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6 years 3 months
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The very 1st show I ever attended was Elton John and Kiki Dee at Schaefer Stadium now know as Gillette Stadium and before that was Sullivan Stadium. Sullivan Stadium is the actual venue. I was in attendance with my older sister who had an extra ticket last minute so it was decided that I was the one who should go to the concert. Yes I was there and yes I remember parts of it but not enough to call it a great time. Only because I was to young to know everything going on there. I remember it was July 4th and Elton came out wearing a Uncle Sam type of outfit. Back in the days when he wore flamboyant outfits every night. Thing that stands out most in my memory was this girl near us decided to rip off her top and dance all night that way. I was completely shocked that anyone would be so bold. In time now looking back this was a common thing later in life at Telluride and the Oregon shows I attended this was common. topless woman dancing meant nothing more to me then the fact that we in area where freedom was so easily displayed. Now so many years later I found a copy of that Elton show online and am rather glad to hear what I saw but missed if that can even make sense
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11 years 5 months
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This would take forever, I think. Mostly, just about any show I wasn't at, I wish I was. A few of the big ones... The Dead at Deer Ck in 89. That was my first invite to a Dead show and I didn't go. Another offer didn't come around again until 95 (night 2 of course). Though, had I fully gotten on the bus in 89, things would have likely been a lot different for me now. The other big one was FTW. I tried getting tix from all the usual channels but was denied. My wife was reluctantly willing to go with, if I had tix but would not just drive to Chicago in hopes of finding some. So, I didn't go. A few other "honorable mentions" would be the Police (Synchronicity tour), Soundgarden (Louder Than Love tour... did see them later), Van Halen (1984 tour). And, this morning, I wish I would have just gone to see Chris Robinson last night! peace, -Dave
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3 years 3 months
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I was driving to California from Connecticut moving to squad Valley in Tahoe city, I was driving across the continental divide when the tape that I was listening to screwed up . Since I was on the continental divide I figured I could get a radio station listening to the radio I heard that Bill Graham was killed in a helicopter crash in California made me furious what a waste it made me shed a tear knowing how instrumental Bill Graham was with so many musicians. All I could think of was Jimmy Buffett saying as I was driving crossed the continental divide the David John Wayne died the irony was incredible, just that my tape deck would've screwed up at that time to hear that broadcast , Anyway that first weekend I was in California the Dead were playing in Oakland I couldn't make it I am just drove across the country . As I remember hearing about the memorial concert at the polo field is the next weekend I said I had to go even though I just wet myself it's the day I'll never forget so many bands such a beautiful day What a shame that such a tragedy had to Spooner such a beautiful memorial. Best to you and yours. Chris
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3 years 3 months
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I'm so i'm so psyched for dicks picks 20 I don't care what it is , I'm just happy to get another recording of the Grateful Dead ,in HDCD , it just makes a sunny day , or a rainy day , sunnier , Love ☮. Chrispy
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2 years 2 months
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...to see Page & Plant. The Dead played 3 shows in Seattle in 1995 on the final tour. I saw the first and last shows, but missed the middle show to see Page & Plant in the Tacoma Dome. I also missed the "Mighty Quinn" encore that night... :(
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11 years 6 months
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I had tickets to see Miles Davis at Jones Beach, NY in 1991 but Miles didn't make the show due to illness. A few weeks later he passed away and I never got to see him live.