Grateful Dead

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Joined: Jan 24 2011
Benny Carnegie Hall

I wasn't thinking along those lines, but that would have been great. The Sing Sing Sing for the ages. I've heard stories about how at the beginning of the show, Krupa thought they were all stiff and nervous, and just suddenly went OFF hitting everything he had as loud as he could, not to wake up the audience, but to wake up the band. Evidently, it worked. They were nervous because Carnegie had never hosted a jazz band, it was a high class tuxedo set kind of thing. One of the band described it as feeling like being a whore at the Waldorf Astoria. Once Krupa got them shaken up a little, everything was aces from there.

Another show I wish I could have seen was one of the 1955 Maria Callas Norma's or Traviata's. Actually I'd die happy if I could have seen her in anything.

And, finally, how about the first Beethoven 9th which he conducted (sort of, the players were instructed to ignore him and pay attention to the concertmaster) himself.

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Joined: Sep 29 2014
'38

Interesting you should mention this show, Marye. A few years ago, following my mother's passing, my father bid me take what I wanted from their prodigious vinyl collection, which included the Columbia releases (vols. 1 & 2) of that famed Carnegie performance (sans encores).

I can only imagine that one or both purchased these during the mid-late '60s while in their waning teen years, as their commitments to education and careers intensified considerably thereafter. And you're right, by what I've read, the idea of playing jazz at this fortress of staid Yankee cultural sensibilities was indeed revolutionary.

Anyway, for other curious novices like myself who'll never venture very far into exploration of this cross-over genre (swing/jazz), Marye's suggestion is worth checking out (think of it as the Barton Hall of Big Band shows!) for not only its recognized landmark historical significance, but at least a passing introduction to the remarkable group play of legendary greats like Harry James, Count Basie, Lionel Hampton, Gene Krupa, and BG himself.

Here's one of my favorites from the night:

/k

Edit: From the intro - "...we started to jam, that is, to fake a little bit about the tune, and continued adding to it a bit every night; and after playing for about two or three years [finally achieved the version played at this show]"...sound familiar DeadHeads? :)))

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Joined: Jan 24 2011
Fantasy missed dream shows and Real missed opportunities

In the category of shows I missed that are Fantasy missed shows because there was no way I was going to be there (like too young or not born yet) would be the Fillmore east February 70 run. To get to see '70 dead, in that environment, at that time, with the Allmans, and Green, and other folks - I'd be more than happy with that choice if I could go back and be there. Was never going to happen, I was 6 years old in another country.

In the category of shows I missed, but could have been there, 3/28/85. That year, my brother and some friends went to that run, while I decided to use the same time-off and funds to go the Texas shows later in the year (Houston and manor downs) so that I could finally get some old college friends to see the GD who never had. Both were lackluster shows, although a good time was had by all. They would never have converted anyone to the "cult of the Grateful Dead" as my best friend and roommate from college worded my attempts to get him into the GD. On the other hand, I understand the Nassau run was very special, opening the 28th with Truckin' into Smokestack into High Time and beyond song selection it was evidently one of THOSE shows (which was never really dependent on song selection anyway.).

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Joined: Dec 17 2011
1st show

Grateful Dead 1/5/79, 1st non Dead show, Yes, 9/12/80. Last Dead show 6/21/95, Albany, N.Y. Most recent show 9/13/14, King Crimson, Verizon Hall, Philadelphia, PA., the encore was Larks Tongues In Aspic my 1st live version. The show I regret missing is 12/1/79, Stanley Theater, Pittsburgh, PA I had a ticket, just couldn't get transportation to Pittsburgh. The show I had the most fun at is 3/17/93, Cap Center, Landover, MD. HAPPY SUNDAY, DEADLAND!!!!

marye's picture
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Joined: May 26 2007
mine

Dead show: Probably Anchorage 6/21/80. From the tapes, incredible. My first show wasn't till the end of that year.

Non-Dead show: Benny Goodman at Carnegie Hall, 1938. While on the road to Red Rocks, Telluride etc. in 1987, I got some cheesy anthology cassette in a truck stop, and it turned out to have a version of "One o'Clock Jump" that's just a stunner, even on the really hissy tape. I finally tracked it down to this show, which currently exists in a nice release with an intro by Benny himself. I was initially surprised that it was played in such a formal setting, because it's hard to imagine NOT dancing to it till you dropped.

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The Show I'm Still Sorry I Missed