• 3 replies
    marye
    Joined:
    May 26, 2007
    Inspired by a recent post by Rottenclam about how, in his vending days, it was necessary to do things like risk missing the second encore so as to be set up for the departing crowds--a reminder that vending's a whole world of its own, with its own experiences and customs. The vending scene's been with us for decades, and probably supported many of our ticket purchases over the years. Got tales of your own? The great artist you wish you could find again? The folks who helped each other out when things went weird? The t-shirt that got away? Tell those stories here!

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  • October 4, 2018 - 6:23pm
    mkav
    Joined:
    June 30, 2007
    stellar brew
    I developed my fondness for good craft and/or imported beers and ales at Shakedown. I noticed that I had never seen nor heard of many of the labels I spotted with the vendors (way back when). Well, I tried one or two or more on occasion, and decided these beers are tasty. Hard to go back to American pilsner when you've had the original Czech pilsner, iMo. At one point I was so inspired I started brewing at home, as some of the styles I liked were not readily available yet. Of course, I named my beers after Dead songs Dark Star = imperial stout. Stellar Brew = one of the first IPAs I ever had (this was 30 yrs ago...IPAs were not so ubiquitous), Steal your Face was a particularly high ABV Christmas ale. Grateful Red was my Irish ale. I can't remember the rest, but you get the gist. Anyway...shakedown is/was true, pure capitalism at its finest...see a need, fill a need, the market is/was self-regulating.
  • September 30, 2018 - 3:34am
    geomeister
    Joined:
    January 18, 2015
    Shakedown
    Thanks for the new forum thread Marye...Ventura 83 must have been a beautiful thing. The whole Shakedown / vending is a social phenomenon that was and remains a very cool thing. Unique in its simplicity, created by need and nurtured with love, that scene would change yet stay the same, show after show, year after year. You gets your Kind grilled cheese sandwiches as well as a righteous glass pipe, a home-made Jerry coaster and a cold beer to set on it. And the T-shirts! The mobile vendor who strolls by with photos appeals, as does the haphazard Serape' thrown on the ground with necklaces. Throw in a row or three of pop-ups with organized tables piled with t-shirts and it's a town. It's nice to see Shakedown is alive and well, folks are still creating, selling and getting by. We all reap the rewards.
  • September 24, 2018 - 3:59pm
    marye
    Joined:
    May 26, 2007
    Boreal was pretty poorly regarded as a show
    But boy, did they have great vending. There were these earrings I had to have, even though my ears weren't pierced at the time. Still got 'em. I remember the vending scene at Ventura '83 pretty fondly.
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11 years 4 months
Inspired by a recent post by Rottenclam about how, in his vending days, it was necessary to do things like risk missing the second encore so as to be set up for the departing crowds--a reminder that vending's a whole world of its own, with its own experiences and customs. The vending scene's been with us for decades, and probably supported many of our ticket purchases over the years. Got tales of your own? The great artist you wish you could find again? The folks who helped each other out when things went weird? The t-shirt that got away? Tell those stories here!
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Member for

11 years 4 months
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But boy, did they have great vending. There were these earrings I had to have, even though my ears weren't pierced at the time. Still got 'em. I remember the vending scene at Ventura '83 pretty fondly.
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Member for

3 years 9 months
Permalink

Thanks for the new forum thread Marye...Ventura 83 must have been a beautiful thing. The whole Shakedown / vending is a social phenomenon that was and remains a very cool thing. Unique in its simplicity, created by need and nurtured with love, that scene would change yet stay the same, show after show, year after year. You gets your Kind grilled cheese sandwiches as well as a righteous glass pipe, a home-made Jerry coaster and a cold beer to set on it. And the T-shirts! The mobile vendor who strolls by with photos appeals, as does the haphazard Serape' thrown on the ground with necklaces. Throw in a row or three of pop-ups with organized tables piled with t-shirts and it's a town. It's nice to see Shakedown is alive and well, folks are still creating, selling and getting by. We all reap the rewards.
user picture

Member for

11 years 3 months
Permalink

I developed my fondness for good craft and/or imported beers and ales at Shakedown. I noticed that I had never seen nor heard of many of the labels I spotted with the vendors (way back when). Well, I tried one or two or more on occasion, and decided these beers are tasty. Hard to go back to American pilsner when you've had the original Czech pilsner, iMo. At one point I was so inspired I started brewing at home, as some of the styles I liked were not readily available yet. Of course, I named my beers after Dead songs Dark Star = imperial stout. Stellar Brew = one of the first IPAs I ever had (this was 30 yrs ago...IPAs were not so ubiquitous), Steal your Face was a particularly high ABV Christmas ale. Grateful Red was my Irish ale. I can't remember the rest, but you get the gist. Anyway...shakedown is/was true, pure capitalism at its finest...see a need, fill a need, the market is/was self-regulating.