Grateful Dead

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marye's picture
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And would you recommend it to anyone else?

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KristineD's picture
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Don't Panic !

Haha! That was a fun read. Enjoy!

marye's picture
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always

a good choice!

elisa75's picture
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Hitchhiker

Im reading "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" by Douglas Adams.

wilfredtjones's picture
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and yet another...

It seems like one just leads to the next! I'm considering Scully's next but I'm just now putting the wraps on A Long Strange Trip: The Inside History of the Grateful Dead by Dennis McNally. A must read for the serious dead freak. I only found one editing mistake, weird is spelled 'wierd' once about 3/4 of the way though. Forgivable, as I've made that boo boo myself in the past. Now I just remember it as my favorite rhythm guitarist's last name with a 'd' at the end.

wilfredtjones's picture
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yes, another Grateful Dead book

So Many Roads: The Life and Times of the Grateful Dead by David Browne. It's a nice follow-up to Billy K.'s book, which I finished reading last week. I'm halfway through Browne's book already after picking it up only late last week. I'm generally a slow reader, so it's notable the rate at which I'm devouring these tomes. David's book follows a chronological path similar to Billy's book, and it dips into some of the same events his does as well. Perhaps not so curiously it often departs in ways, some minor and some no-so-minor from other retellings of the same stories. This is a well sourced and interesting read although there are some obvious editing errors which always makes me scratch my head. Cannot someone proofread these things?

wilfredtjones's picture
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Kind of recently finished reading...

Practicing: A Musician's Return to Music by Glenn Kurtz. It was a fun, interesting, dare I say inspiring read. A memoir of sorts. I should have read it long before now as I was gifted it by a student some 4 years ago. Kind of puts me in my place, a place I am most comfortable existing as a practicing musician. It proved to be page turner nonetheless and I'd most vociferously recommend it to all folks interested in the art of practice. Thanks, Tom (and Mr. Kurtz). I'm kind of embarrassed to say what I'm reading now (no it's not the Joy of Sex or the Kama Sutra) but it's certainly not Dante's Inferno...

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Have recently finished reading...

The Maze Runner, The Goldfinch, and I'm currently reading The Mountain Echoes...in the bathroom, something by Bill Bryson is read while poopin'...what are you reading? Love live the Div!

marye's picture
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Dennis McNally: On Highway 61

HIGHLY recommended. Great storytelling. Dennis had a booksigning at the local bookstore last night, and it was fun to see him. He may be coming to a bookstore near you...

marye's picture
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that's a good one

I read it back in the '80s when Phil mentioned it in an interview with David Gans. Great book. In a similar vein, Odd John, by Olaf Stapledon, somewhat earlier. Haven't read either one for years, but they had a huge influence on me too.

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More Than Human

Just finished reading, "More Than Human" by Theodore Sturgeon. A very good read.

Excerpt from the book, "Searching For The Sound" by Phil Lesh:

"The unique organicity of our music reflects the fact that each of us consciously personalized his playing: to fit with what others were playing and to fit with who each man was as an individual, allowing us to meld our consciousnesses together in the unity of a group mind.

For us, the philosophical basis of this concept was articulated by the science-fiction writer Theodore Sturgeon in his novel More Than Human, wherein the protagonists each have a single paranormal talent – telepathy, psychokinesis, teleportation – and are joined by a quadruple paraplegic who acts as a central processing unit. The process by which they become one is called bleshing, from a combination of mesh and blend."

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