Grateful Dead

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Anna rRxia's picture
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Joined: Dec 25 2009
Sometimes A Great Notion

Most people know this is Kesey's most critically acclaimed, seminal work. It is my holiday read but looks as if I'll finish it as quickly as the author of the forward did.

A passage:

"Look... Reality is greater than the sum of it's parts, also a damn site holier. And the lives of such stuff as dreams are made of may be rounded with a sleep but they are not tied neatly with a red bow. Truth doesn't run on time like a commuter train, though time may run on truth. And The Scenes Gone By an The Scenes To Come flow blending together in the sea-green deep while Now spreads in circles on the surface. So don't sweat it. For focus simply move a few inches back or forward. And once more...look"

Awesome! Kesey wrote this in 1964, well after experimenting with acid. He didn't write another thing for 20 years and never achieved the greatness of this book. A cliche, I know, but this is one of the most important works of an American author in that century.

PalmerEldritch's picture
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Joined: Jul 25 2011
Wild

"Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail"- by Cheryl Strayed.
I really loved this memoir of a young woman hiking the Pacific Crest Trial alone. She's not a Deadhead, but maybe similar in spirit. She does mention hearing of Jerry's passing during the hike and attending a memorial. And to think I have a backpack in my closet I only used once about 10 years ago.....:(

Mr. Pid's picture
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Joined: Dec 22 2007
Too much

into some things, and perhaps not enough into others. And altogether too many street signs. Wish I had time for books, too.

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Joined: Oct 3 2012
Relix!

Relix!

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Joined: Oct 3 2012
Relix!

Relix!

Anna rRxia's picture
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Joined: Dec 25 2009
Rad Rabbit

Tom Clancy in all his slow-paced, ascerbic bestas Jack Harris.

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Joined: Feb 3 2012
Finishing What I Started

I guess you could say my New Year's resolution was to finish all the books I've started and put down over the years. Somehow I'm able to pick up a book after not reading it for an extended period of time and instantly recall everything that's gone on. Anyway, my current task is finishing "The Iliad," which I put down back in '05. It's a hefty read, though, and has been tough to get through as my time to read is limited (my wife and I are expecting our first little bundle of joy and future Deadhead).

As for whether or not I'd recommend "The Iliad," that's a definite YES. While it's extremely dated as a topical story, it's a mesmerizing read and is thoroughly captivating to the imagination. My only regret is not having the time to sit down and finish it all in one sitting.

marye's picture
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Joined: May 26 2007
cool

Manzanar, very important book.

Mike Edwards's picture
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Joined: Jun 17 2007
Teaching the Conflicts

Farewell to Manzanar by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston & James D. Houston

Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston was seven years old when her family was rounded up and shipped off to the Manzanar internment camp in California for the duration of WWII. This fall semester, I'll be teaching this text in a developmental writing class, along with March to Freedom by Edith Singer, who was sixteen years old when her family was rounded up and shipped off to the Auschwitz concentration camp in Polish areas annexed by Nazi Germany during WWII.

slo lettuce's picture
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Joined: Jul 20 2012
The Sun

another wonderful ad-free, reader supported magazine. Sy Safransky, the founder, editor and publisher, states it best: "this is a magazine that celebrates beauty without ignoring the destructive forces around us; a monthly, 48 page journal of memoirs, essays,short stories, interviews, poems and photographs with some of the most radically intimate and socially concious writing being published today. Month after month, we come together to celebrate the glory and heartache of being human".

My favorite section is one called "readers write". published letters from readers who have written in about a single,specific monthly topic ( upcoming topics include: trying too hard, going home, eyes, winging it, skin) and usually covers 8-10 pages. these letters are written from every angle imaginable. reading these letters is a lot like reading the wonderful posts on this site, it helps to remind me that many, many people out there are going through the same daily "thing" that i am (we all are!) and it can be a real mood booster, eye opener and produce those ever so precious - i -never- thought- of- it -that- way - moments. just like so many of the wonderful lyrics and music from that one band..........what was their name?

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