• 3 replies
    Srinivasan.Mut…
    Joined:
    July 2, 2018

    One of the shortest-lived iterations of the Grateful Dead was the band that existed December 1971 through March 1972. Jerry, Bob, Phil, Bill, Pigpen, and Keith formed a formidable version of the Dead that only played a few shows together before Donna Jean joined as vocalist, and before Pigpen would depart the stage for good in June 1972. What this sextet lacked in quantity of shows it made up for with creativeness, power, and inspiration. 

    When Pigpen rejoined the Dead on December 1, 1971, after a few months off during which Keith had joined as piano player, the band was now an unstoppably powerful live juggernaut it hadn’t been since the height of the Primal Dead era in late 1968-1969. Widely considered one of the best shows from the Pigpen-Keith era of the Grateful Dead, December 10, 1971 in St. Louis has it all: Pigpen singing lead on four songs including an 18-minute version of Good Lovin’ and a very rare performance of Run Rudolph Run; a deep dive into the Dead’s psychedelic recent past with a monster version of The Other One; plus plenty of the new material from earlier in 1971 like Bertha, Loser, Sugaree, and Playing In The Band. 

    They also hit upon much of the music that would appear the following year on Europe ‘72, such as Jack Straw, Tennessee Jed, Mr. Charlie, and One More Saturday Night. And no Dead show of this vintage would be complete without the “hits”: Truckin’, Sugar Magnolia, and Casey Jones all make appearances. This is truly one of the deepest, most dynamic, exciting, and accessible live shows in the entire Grateful Dead canon.

Comments

sort by
Recent
Reset
  • July 21, 2021 - 10:54am
    SIdead
    Default Avatar
    Joined:
    July 21, 2021
    7100 of these would make…

    7100 of these would make sense.

  • July 21, 2021 - 10:54am
    sean hemmerle
    Joined:
    July 10, 2012
    This show is a smoker

    One of the first tapes I was ever given. This 6 piece version of the Dead has always been one of my favorite time periods- they combine the country folk of the A.B./Workingmans stuff with their turn towards the psychedelic jazz that ‘73-‘74 would bring. Keith is, ironically, in peak form given that he’d only been with the band for a short while by then.
    So stoked they made this an official release on vinyl. Worth every penny knowing that I’ll have this show at my fingertips forever- December ‘71 was a criminally underrated time for the band.

  • July 21, 2021 - 9:36am
    Dennis
    Joined:
    November 1, 2012
    Limited

    Though I can't find it here, Amazon says they are limited to 12,000.

    Will they go fast? No word on what the 10th side etching will be.

user picture

Member for

3 years

One of the shortest-lived iterations of the Grateful Dead was the band that existed December 1971 through March 1972. Jerry, Bob, Phil, Bill, Pigpen, and Keith formed a formidable version of the Dead that only played a few shows together before Donna Jean joined as vocalist, and before Pigpen would depart the stage for good in June 1972. What this sextet lacked in quantity of shows it made up for with creativeness, power, and inspiration. 

When Pigpen rejoined the Dead on December 1, 1971, after a few months off during which Keith had joined as piano player, the band was now an unstoppably powerful live juggernaut it hadn’t been since the height of the Primal Dead era in late 1968-1969. Widely considered one of the best shows from the Pigpen-Keith era of the Grateful Dead, December 10, 1971 in St. Louis has it all: Pigpen singing lead on four songs including an 18-minute version of Good Lovin’ and a very rare performance of Run Rudolph Run; a deep dive into the Dead’s psychedelic recent past with a monster version of The Other One; plus plenty of the new material from earlier in 1971 like Bertha, Loser, Sugaree, and Playing In The Band. 

They also hit upon much of the music that would appear the following year on Europe ‘72, such as Jack Straw, Tennessee Jed, Mr. Charlie, and One More Saturday Night. And no Dead show of this vintage would be complete without the “hits”: Truckin’, Sugar Magnolia, and Casey Jones all make appearances. This is truly one of the deepest, most dynamic, exciting, and accessible live shows in the entire Grateful Dead canon.

user picture

Member for

8 years 8 months
Permalink

Though I can't find it here, Amazon says they are limited to 12,000.

Will they go fast? No word on what the 10th side etching will be.

user picture

Member for

9 years
Permalink

One of the first tapes I was ever given. This 6 piece version of the Dead has always been one of my favorite time periods- they combine the country folk of the A.B./Workingmans stuff with their turn towards the psychedelic jazz that ‘73-‘74 would bring. Keith is, ironically, in peak form given that he’d only been with the band for a short while by then.
So stoked they made this an official release on vinyl. Worth every penny knowing that I’ll have this show at my fingertips forever- December ‘71 was a criminally underrated time for the band.

product sku
889198321667
Product Magento URL
https://store.dead.net/special-edition-shops/st-louis-collection/fox-theatre-st-louis-mo-12-10-71-5-lp-1.html