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This is only known to have been played once, on 17 July 1966. But it was no doubt played on other occasions in the early years. See below for even earlier pre-Dead versions.

It is normally thought to be a traditional song, but the liner notes on "Birth Of The Dead" credit it to Clayton McMichen and Slim Bryant, who played with Bill Monroe.

Lyrics By
Traditional
Music By
Traditional
Lyrics

Little girl, little girl what have I done
To make you treat me so
You have caused me to weep, you have caused me to moan
You have caused me to leave my home

In the pines, in the pines
Where the sun never shines
I shiver when the cold winds blow

My daddy was a railroad man
Drove a mile and a half uptown
His head was found 'neath the driving wheel
His body has never been found

The longest train I ever saw
Was down that northern line
The engine passed by at ten o'clock
The cab passed by at nine

Little girl, little girl what have I done
To make you treat me so
You have caused me to weep, you have caused me to moan
You have caused me to leave my home

  • In The Pines
    Lyrics By:
    Music By:

    Little girl, little girl what have I done
    To make you treat me so
    You have caused me to weep, you have caused me to moan
    You have caused me to leave my home

    In the pines, in the pines
    Where the sun never shines
    I shiver when the cold winds blow

    My daddy was a railroad man
    Drove a mile and a half uptown
    His head was found 'neath the driving wheel
    His body has never been found

    The longest train I ever saw
    Was down that northern line
    The engine passed by at ten o'clock
    The cab passed by at nine

    Little girl, little girl what have I done
    To make you treat me so
    You have caused me to weep, you have caused me to moan
    You have caused me to leave my home

    This is only known to have been played once, on 17 July 1966. But it was no doubt played on other occasions in the early years. See below for even earlier pre-Dead versions.

    It is normally thought to be a traditional song, but the liner notes on "Birth Of The Dead" credit it to Clayton McMichen and Slim Bryant, who played with Bill Monroe.