Grateful Dead

Greatest Stories Ever Told - "High Time"

By David Dodd

Here’s the plan—each week, I will blog about a different song, focusing, usually, on the lyrics, but also on some other aspects of the song, including its overall impact—a truly subjective thing. Therefore, the best part, I would hope, would not be anything in particular that I might have to say, but rather, the conversation that may happen via the comments over the course of time—and since all the posts will stay up, you can feel free to weigh in any time on any of the songs! With Grateful Dead lyrics, there’s always a new and different take on what they bring up for each listener, it seems. (I’ll consider requests for particular songs—just private message me!)

High Time"

Coming around again on that time in the Deadhead year, the Days Between, so I will continue with another Jerry tune or two as we think about the life he led and the music he brought to all of us. It feels just slightly liturgical somehow. There’s a topic on the WELL—the online conferencing community—in the Grateful Dead conference, called “This Day in Deadhead History,” and it’s an ongoing circular conversation about the shows and events on any given date. The topic in and of itself is an acknowledgment of the cycles inherent in the life of a Deadhead, and the Days Between is a major period of a week and two days marking Garcia’s birthday and the anniversary of his death.

So, it seems like a good time to look at “High Time.”

Truthfully, I am starting to lose track of what I have blogged about! So stop me if you’ve heard this one…but actually, it’s pretty likely I would write something completely different each time around, in the same way that I hear different aspects of the songs over the years.

“High Time” is an example of the kind of lyric that evoked a mirroring in Garcia’s music. It has a plaintive quality, both in words and music, and Garcia’s singing on the Workingman’s Dead track is ambitious, with its extended high notes.

Interestingly, this song generated not a single annotation for The Complete Annotated Grateful Dead Lyrics. Nor has there been any discussion on the WELL’s “deadsongs” conference. But the bridge, at least, probably merits an annotation.

I was losing time

I had nothing to do

No one to fight

I came to you

Wheels broke down

The leader won’t draw.

The line is busted

the last one I saw.

The Workingman’s Dead set of songs, it seems to me, contains quite a number of archaic lines, or, at least, lines and verses that are set in some non-specific past of America. That’s what holds the songs together as an album. So in this bridge, we are given a picture of a team of horses who cannot pull a wagon. The wheels are actually broken, and the line itself is busted. The lead horse has refused to try to pull the cart. (“If the horse won’t pull you got to carry the load,” right?)

The character singing the song is lamenting the loss of his lover, and is trying to cope with his own flaws. He misunderstood the object of his affection when she told him goodbye. He has overloaded the wagon with too much hay. His efforts to convince both the lost lover and, more likely, himself, seem like they might well fail. His arguments are none too convincing—there is a resignation in his cheerleading efforts: “Nothing’s for certain / It could always go wrong.” And “”Tomorrow come trouble / Tomorrow come pain / Now don’t think too hard baby / ‘cause you know what I’m saying.”

I mean, is he or is he not trying to convince this woman to return to him? It doesn’t sound like it, really. The character singing the song may have a “ton of hay,” but what good will that do him? It just makes it harder to enjoy life, when one has to deal with too much success (“hay” being a synonym for bounty—“Make hay while the sun shines”). So he is having a hard time. (Another line from “New Speedway Boogie” comes to mind: “It’s hard to run with the weight of gold.”)

The “High Time” of the title is, at best, ironic. Look at the various “times” mentioned in the song: “High time,” in verse one. “Hard time” in verse two. “Losing time” in the bridge. “High time” again in verses three and four.

The essay about the songs on Workingman’s Dead on the excellent “Grateful Dead Guide” blog contains this information about the song:

Hunter & Garcia then tried their hands at an old-style country ballad, High Time. Hunter said, “For High Time, I wanted a song like the kind of stuff I heard rolling out of the jukeboxes of bars my father frequented when I was a kid. Probably a subliminal Hank Williams influence…a late-‘40s sad feel.” But later Garcia said that High Time was “the song that I think failed on that record… It’s a beautiful song, but I was just not able to sing it worth a shit.” (McNally suggests that Hunter wrote it so Garcia could play pedal steel on it. Live, that wasn’t possible; but Garcia does add some pedal licks to the album cut.) At any rate, High Time also went through some changes – live in ’69, it was very quiet, skeletal & wispy with a long instrumental intro, but was condensed to a more straightforward, poppy version for the album.

I have to disagree with Garcia there. I don’t think the song failed, and I don’t think Garcia failed in his vocal interpretation, although I understand what he means. I think the “failure” in the vocal perfectly mirrors the failure of the character singing the song.

Recently, two of my band-mates sang me a version of “High Time” at a party someone threw to surprise me. I was touched, and surprised at the bravery of the song choice. It is not an easy song to sing. That “Come in when it’s raining” line, alone, would challenge any singer. So the song has been on my mind for a few months now, and it’s sitting there as a possible song for my band to add to our repertoire. (We don’t do very many Dead tunes. Just “Wharf Rat” and “Friend of the Devil.”)

Who would be the perfect artist to cover this song? There must be someone with the kind of voice Garcia was hearing in his head. Maybe Hunter was hearing someone like Patsy Cline in that 1940s or 1950s jukebox from the bars of his childhood.

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A.Cajun.Head's picture
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Joined: Jun 3 2014
Maybe the relationship is in question due to his "high time"...

One feeling I get from the song is that the lady doesn't really want to let go of the relationship but the protagonist may have a propensity to having his "high time" and not really taking care of the needs of a relationship. "Wheels are muddy, got a ton of hay..." Have a LOT to do but I'd rather keep my wheels muddy having my high time. Why don't you just join me and and chill... "I can show you a high time...." Of course she is all about the business of having a husband/father of the children/provider so she's probably not going to happy.... and is giving him the ultimatum.

Maybe I'm projecting some past personal experience on the tune, but isn't that what we all do?

Deadicated's picture
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Joined: Jun 4 2007
OMG

ddodd - I read the posts today and was going to chime in with kd lang!!! She has the pipes for "come in when it's rainin'" for sure. She could harmonize with herself. Lu Williams has the sensibility for it but I don't know how she'd handle that line? hmmm...

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Joined: May 9 2012
William Elliot Whitmore

Not sure if anyone mentioned William Elliot Whitmore. I highly recommend checking him out. I've played/sang this one. One of the more "exotic" songs chord wise. Always have dug the C#m (4th fret), F#m (5th fret), up to E at seventh fret. Just lovely. The different fingering add for unique flavors.Deep song lyrically. Also, pretty rare. Jerry would bust it out 4 or 5 times a year. Or not play it for a year or two. Great song.

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Joined: Jun 26 2013
I'd love to hear every

I'd love to hear every suggestion sing this song...but George Jones or Graham Parson would be a trick; but wouldn't it be perfect for them to come back and sing a Grateful Dead song today! Same goes for Elvis...that would be a Heavenly Trio !!

My favorite choice is Lyle Lovett!
He would really give it a salty flavor I think.

I think Edie Brickell would do a splendid job as well with this melody; and make it delightfully sweet

As for the song...
It strikes me of the harsh reality we all likely face when the Honeymoon is over and the 'Living Happily Ever After' loses its Happiness.

Where have all the Good Times Gone?

Its hard to get High when you're stuck in the Mud under a Load that Weighs a Ton.

"but don't feel too bad baby..."

The Good Times are bound to roll around again

Strider 88's picture
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The Possum

George Jones would have been great but he's gone. If I can remember right Jerry Garcia spoke about that very song in the 1972 Rolling Stone interview that became the book "Signpost to Inner Space". He mentioned an old time female country singer that he thought would do the song justice. As I have not read the book in 40 years her names escapes me. Who can come up with Jerry's choice for singing High Time?
Gram Parsons and Emmy Lou Harris would have been amazing as a duet on High Time similar to their song Hearts on Fire. Alas Gram also long gone. Emmy Lou solo? The unknown singer on the street who "played real good for free"?
Up before dawn. Another day of work. Gotta pay for all this music before this Workingman's Dead.
Merl Haggard?

Underthevolcano's picture
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cover

I think Lucinda Williams would be great-also Bob Dylan. The song itself-wonderful eternal feel to it-could have been written or performed at virtually any point in the last several decades. It also, however screams dust bowl/depression to me. Hardscrabble lives with perpetual defeat and disappointment but with a shred of optimism or really hope against hope in there too.

A.Cajun.Head's picture
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Joined: Jun 3 2014
How about Lyle?

I think Lyle Lovett would do an interesting version!! I love his "If I Had a Pony"

ddodd's picture
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Nice ideas all around

Some very fun ideas about possible cover artists. Of course, Willie, although I was one of many who anxiously awaited his cover of "Stella Blue," only to be somewhat disappointed in the result. Personally, I'd like to hear kd lang do "High Time."

Also, love the thought of the song viewed as a dialogue between two voices! What a very cool idea.

PonchoBill's picture
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Joined: Jul 29 2009
Ripple

There was an old independant magazine i bought in 90/91 called "Ripple". It was pretty much all handwritten with black and white photos. Some nice articles about Jerry"s pedal steel work, Woodstock, Wavy Gravy and a nice article on "Built To Last". The creme de la creme however, was a 45 rpm single of "High Time" and "Cumberland Blues" from Woodstock that was included. The sound was terrible of course, but I had fallen in love with that lonesome sound. "High Time" remains one of my favourite Jerry ballads to this day. As far as who could pull off a cover...? Ol Willie for sure. Maybe a couple of others, but really? Who could do this song justice? It's perfect the way it is.

Thanks David

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Joined: Dec 4 2012
Good Bye

Another random thought while we're beating about other artists ... every time I hear Richard Thompson's "I Misunderstood" I think of this song.

She said "Darling I'm in love with your mind.
The way you care for me, it's so kind.
Love to see you again, I wish I had more time."

She was laughing as she brushed my cheek
"Why don't you call me, angel, maybe next week
Promise now, cross your heart and hope to die."

But I misunderstood, but I misunderstood, but I misunderstood;
I thought she was saying good luck, she was saying good bye.

As Hunter puts it, more simply: "You didn't mean goodbye, you meant please don't let me go."

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