Grateful Dead

July 5 - July 11, 2010

Tapers Section By David Lemieux

Welcome back to the Tapers' Section, where this week we have music from the 1980s, three sequences that ended concerts. We hope your 4th of July celebrations were fun!

Our first stop this week is on April Fool's day, 4/1/84, at Marin Civic, the last-ever Grateful Dead show at the tiny, Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Marin Civic, a terrific venue. From that show, we have the second-set closing sequence of Morning Dew>GDTRFB>I Neeed A Miracle>Good Lovin', Touch of Grey, the last song being the encore. These shows must have been particularly fun for the band, being so close to home, and for the office staff and crew, as Marin Civic was only a mile or so from GDHQ.

Next up is more music from Laguna Seca '88, specifically the middle show of three nights, on 7/30/88, where we have the post-Space sequence of Smokestack Lightnin' > Goin' Down The Road Feeling Bad > Wharf Rat > Throwing Stones > One More Saturday Night. Cool to see a Smokestack out of Space.

Lastly this week, from 7/31/88 at Laguna Seca, we have the show-ending jam of The Other One > I Need A Miracle > Morning Dew, In The Midnight Hour, with the last song being the encore. There were a few repeats in this week's Tapers' Section, but we don't mind, as they all fall within unique sequences.

Be sure to stop by next week for more great GD music. We have some fun stuff coming up. As always, we encourage you to write to us at the Tapers' Section, at the email address below. Please be sure to include “Grateful Dead” in your subject to make sure your missive busts through our state-of-the-art spam filters.

David Lemieux
vault@dead.net

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unkle sam's picture
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Joined: Oct 3 2008
2nd sets

THANK YOU for the second sets, unfortunately the 88 sets cut off, no midnight hour and cuts off in the middle of wharf rat.

SPACEBROTHER's picture
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Joined: Jun 4 2007
.......

I should say, the Dead saved music from itself during the mid-late '80s.

SPACEBROTHER's picture
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Joined: Jun 4 2007
Sweeeeeet

My personal favorite era. The two "Dews" have everything. Subtlety, energy, peaks, valleys, crescendos, decrescendos. The 70's were great in that I like the jamminess but the '80s saw them evolve into the rock and roll band America needed. Considering the mediocrity that was prevailent in most popular music at that time, the Dead were a refreshing change of pace in the sense that they did what they did instead of falling into the fads of the era.

In the '70s, the Dead followed the current fads more so, I loved the fusion approach in the earlier part of the decade but not-so-much the "Disco-Outfreakage". They could've become a glam band, big hair band, new wave but thankfully bucked the trends of the era. I would even go as far as to say that they saved music from the '80s. It would'nt be until a few years later that festivals like Horde would embrace and resuscitate the "jam" element from it's dormancy.

Thank you for the tunes from my favorite era. I would so love to see the Laguna Seca shows released. If other people would prefer more '70s Dead over this run, perhaps David Lemieux or Blair Jackson could just send me copies for my own personal enjoyment ;).

smallz's picture
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Joined: Jun 4 2007
second set is where it's at

I think someone last week posted a request for Laguna Seca '88...thanks for obliging, David! Love the second set madness this week. Awesome pics! And all new to these ears...

Benny Jakes's picture
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Joined: Jun 4 2007
I missed 89-90.

The wall of sound was so amazing and overwhelming. Afterward the big venues were strange.
But, the dancing was fantastic. all the freaks came out for the party. The boys brought amazing stuff even when they played a little rough. And great things came, just farther between.

Is that my glass? Can you see it? Understand me?

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Joined: Aug 21 2007
DL

Civic Center is only a highway exit away from the old offices indeed, 1.7 miles to be exact (Rainman has spoken). I had such a blast being walking distance from the Palm Ballroom Furthur Live Rehearsals this past May. There's nothing like a hometown show that is walking distance or a subway/bus ride away. Warfield Jerry shows in the 90's when I lived in the Haight and the Sunset district and took the N Judah, MSG in 1987 when I still lived at home in Harlem/Washington Heights and took the 1 train. Went to Coney Island Furthur shows last week and stayed with my mom in Brooklyn, only a half hour subway ride away on the Q. Now I live near the Civic in Marin. Bring the boys back there for Halloween!

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Joined: Aug 21 2007
respectfully disagree

lamagonzo,
To say that it was always more about us than it was about the band implies a kind of narcissism that I find misses something. That something is symbiosis, a two way process in which one side never becomes more important than the other. The Grateful Dead/audience connection definitely had more symbiosis than other bands had. That being said, I think that the band members were so wrapped up in their own trips at times (as only one example Jerry, mid-80's, H) that this symbiosis turned more into a kind of co-dependence.

I agree with mpace largely, and this coming from a head who started seeing shows in 1984 and whose heyday ended around 1989. The 80's did have a special feel that no other decade had. I cringe now when I hear mumbled lyrics, flubbed transitions within songs, forgotten passages, frayed voices, etc. But I still listen to those tapes because they have their own unique thing, each year, a different gem with different impurities.

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Joined: Jun 18 2007
electronic other one

Did not see the Dead in the mid and late 80 and have no passion for much of the style from this period but the 7/31/88 'other one' was just plain entertaining. I had not heard that style in my many years(decades) of listening. Must have avoided much too much of the period to have heard something really new for the first time in ages.

Thanks for the selection.

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Joined: Jun 5 2007
mpace

I totally agree, for the 80's were the Deads downfall...sure they still managed to pull out some great shows from the very early 80's.....but from 83-87, that was it. Yeah unfortunantly I will hear crap from other heads, but remember yo each there own decade.

lamagonzo (not verified)
Thanks for tjhe post-drum sequences this week!

Lots of Dews, Miracles and GDTRFBs, never a bad thing. Keep'em coming.

MPace, some good insights there but I think you're comments are light on being Grateful. It's understood about the drugs but I don't think you get one without the other -- with the Dead that is. Every show turned into an acid test (for about 1/2 the crowd) and the Dead were the house band. It was always more about us than it was about the band. We're just lucky they always understood that.

"All Right, all right. We gotcha' all night long."
(Garcia to a front-rows freak-out fan)

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