Grateful Dead

June 18 - June 24, 2012

Tapers Section By David Lemieux

Welcome back to the Tapers' Section, where this week we have some fine tunes from 1970, 1974 and 1993.

Our first selection this week is the big jam from 2/11/70 at the Fillmore East in New York City, during one of the finest runs of the shows the Grateful Dead ever performed. From this night, we have Dark Star>Spanish Jam>Lovelight, featuring loads of special guests.

Next up is the third and final version of the musical palindrome consisteing of Playing In The Band>Uncle John's Band>Morning Dew>Uncle John's Band>Playing In The Band from 3/23/74 Cow Palace. This was part of Dick's Picks Vol. 24.

Lastly this week is some recent Grateful Dead music, from 1/26/93 in Oakland, where we have the start of Set 2: Man Smart, Woman Smarter>Eyes Of The World>Estimated Prophet>Terrapin Station. There was some fine music played by the Grateful Dead in the first half of 1993.

Be sure to join us here next week for more music from vault.

David Lemieux
vault@dead.net

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Albrecht's picture
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Joined: Jun 7 2007
The 2/11/70 segment is just...

sooo good! I especially thinkin´ of Phils playing. Bass never sounded or played so well. Very impressive!

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Joined: Aug 17 2007
ELP playing Dead

(I don't add this to put down other musicians, but to put Greg Lake's purported remark, mentioned above by this one, in its place, re Grateful Dead music--)
I doubt that Emerson, Lake & Palmer would or could perform a passable Row Jimmy or Here Comes Sunshine. (Could you imagine them playing Beat It on Down the Line? Tennessee Jed?) (But who knows.) But let them give a try to China Cat Sunflower, that'd be a test. (I wonder whether they would have had the rhythmic flexibility.)

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Joined: Jun 4 2007
Allman

I'm surprised to hear Allman's comments in light of the video montage they showed when I saw them in the late 90's (Gregg & Dickey were both in the band, and I'm almost sure Butch was, too). It was a tribute to musical brothers no longer with us, and Jerry ~ whose loss was very recent then ~ figured prominently (more than one shot). And what really touched me was they showed Brent, as well. I really, really appreciated it, and whatever he wrote in his book I'll remember that moment of kinship from the Allmans to the Dead and their fans, because I was primarily a Deadhead and it felt like we'd shared a hug.

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Joined: Jun 13 2007
------------------------------------(-----@

Thanks for the great picks here.
On a third run through and it's been sweet!
Lots of tremendous jamming in the songs...
ahhhhhhh...The Grateful Dead.

Love & smiles to you, rock on, xo!
---------------------------------(----@

marye's picture
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Joined: May 26 2007
now there

is a good laugh to start the morning!

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Joined: Nov 23 2007
dissing the dead

You know you have impact when people either love you or hate you. I heard that Greg Lake of ELP said once that they (ELP) could play the dead's music, but the dead couldn't play their's. Really? I know I'd much rather hear the dead play Lucky Man than I would ELP play Truckin'.

Chef Free's picture
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Joined: May 25 2008
WoW! This is the longest

WoW! This is the longest version of 2/11/70 I've heard! Thanks David!

Anna rRxia's picture
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Joined: Dec 25 2009
Greg is just jealous!

Any band would walk over hot coals to have the fan base of the Grateful Dead. It seems perverse that bands would belittle their fans, or any other band's fans. After all, the genre is rock'n'roll and many serious people in the musical world think rock is a joke.

For a rock band to have diehard fans who want their music played at their funerals is quite an honor. How many people have requested Allman Brothers songs played at their funerals, weddings or whatever? Not many I bet...

In the book STP some member of the Rolling Stones makes the remark that the Stones were even bigger than the Grateful Dead. I suppose that is a compliment in the sense that the Dead are perceived to be America's most popular rock act to be compared against. I'm not sure how true that was in 1972 but it sure enough was true fifteen years later!

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Joined: Jun 4 2007
Gregg

He comes across as a pumpkin for the most part. You wouldn't want to be married to him but otherwise seems like a peach of a guy (ha ha).

The comments about GD were surprising...you wonder what the deal is. I mean he might have lost the battle but won the war. He's still alive and playing music...as opposed to Jerry, Pigpen et al.

But I found it refreshing to some extent. It never hurt my feelings when friends, brothers, wife or rock stars I dig bashed the GD. I found it amusing and appreciated the candor.

I can't explain what it does or why it does what it does. You know what, I think Deadheads on some deep level are cool with themselves. That may be our secret.

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Joined: Sep 19 2007
interesting...

doublet

interesting perspective, esp from a drummers standpoint. but when i think about it, when the dead had 2 drummers, it isnt very often that i find myself listening to them (though i do have a hershey park aud tape that the drummers KILL, esp during terrapin), where i find myself listening when it was just billy. 71 post mickey, pre keith, i love that stripped down band.

i just think its so cool how the band's sound kept changing...!

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