• 33 replies
    marye
    Joined:
    May 26, 2007
    By request, the headlines and links to stories that grabbed your attention. Do not post full copyrighted stories here; they will be deleted. Just link to the source. Thanks!

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  • July 30, 2014 - 3:17pm
    bolo24
    Joined:
    November 25, 2009
    More about Jerry
    http://www.sfexaminer.com/sanfrancisco/san-francisco-to-honor-native-so… This one includes the actual resolution - a good read.
  • July 30, 2014 - 11:45am
    marye
    Joined:
    May 26, 2007
    In today's SF Chronicle
    "Jerry Garcia may be most closely linked in many people’s mind with the Haight-Ashbury, but the Grateful Dead front man and San Francisco native actually grew up in another neighborhood — and the supervisor who represents that area wants to make sure he’s remembered there. "Supervisor John Avalos introduced a resolution Tuesday that would let the city install commemorative street plaques in front of 121 Amazon Avenue, where Garcia lived with his parents until he was 5, and 87 Harrington Street, where he and his brother lived with their grandparents after his father’s accidental death."... More at http://blog.sfgate.com/cityinsider/2014/07/29/jerry-garcia-childhood-homes-may-be-commemorated/
  • February 2, 2013 - 7:12am
    Anna rRxia
    Joined:
    December 25, 2009
    Heard
    It through the grapevine.
  • February 2, 2013 - 7:08am
    Anna rRxia
    Joined:
    December 25, 2009
    I buy the Boston Globe on the odd Sunday
    It seems like an exercise in nostalgia. The Globe has an "A" quality comics section that includes Zippy; Doonesbury; Non-Sequitir. Then thee are the coupon sections where I'm able to make up the $4 of the cover price. I could get most of it on-line without any environmental impact but it there is something visceral about holding the paper in my hands. Dissecting it, discarding those sections (auto, real-estate, Parade Margazin) tht won't be perused. Tomorrow I'll get the final recap on a story for the Superbowl that hasn't really changes for two weeks. In this day and age where getting news in the most timely fashion, sometimes there is the odd story where a greater or lesser amount of perspective can be summed up or totaled in a "current" fashion. I am holding in my hand the blow-up of the "Bizarro" (12/16/12) comic in which there is an old-time propaganda scene of Mao holding up his little red book which is now emblazoned with the letters "LMAO". I'm left wondering if it isn't worth buying the paper on the odd Sunday. Yeahh, I guess I will...
  • February 1, 2013 - 1:17pm
    marye
    Joined:
    May 26, 2007
    Jerry in the funny papers...
  • June 23, 2012 - 9:59am
    marye
    Joined:
    May 26, 2007
    wow
    rock on, young Kumar...
  • June 23, 2012 - 5:17am
    Anna rRxia
    Joined:
    December 25, 2009
    As seen in The Himalayan Times
    I can't post a link to the rest of this story as the site just streams a multitude of stories that that are impossible to find again. Here are a few of the beginning paragraphs. I posted it because it contrasts with how spoiled we are in this country. Rock, and the freedom to play/perform it, just seems to be a right like breathing air. Imagine if your band had to rehearse in an old outhouse... ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** ****** ***** In the far north-east of India, cut off from the rest of the country except via a narrow land bridge, perhaps the only way to make yourself heard is loud, really loud, rock music. For White Fire's drummer Elangbam Kumar, that explains why their cover version of the Guns'N'Roses song "Welcome To The Jungle" has become an anthem for the band and a big hit with their fans in the remote state of Manipur. The state, which is 1,000 miles (1,700 kilometres) from the capital New Delhi, borders on Myanmar and has struggled for decades with separatist violence, a society divided among competing tribes and grinding poverty. It is also an unlikely hub for rock and heavy metal music, boasting a burgeoning festival scene and local stars who have defied social and cultural boundaries to pursue their music. "All my pain and angst found an outlet in this genre of music. It is the attitude and the lyrics which are the biggest draw for us," 32-year-old Kumar, his tattooed biceps bulging out of a tight T-shirt. ***** ***** ***** ****** ****** ***** ***** ***** Anybody want to go to a festie or two in Manipur? Guaranteed to be more memorable than your last Bonaroo experience!
  • June 22, 2012 - 7:57pm
    marye
    Joined:
    May 26, 2007
    man, me too
    what a curse.
  • June 22, 2012 - 6:54pm
    Mr. Pid
    Joined:
    December 22, 2007
    Celebrity
    is one of the most expensive forms of capital available. Why some people covet it so is beyond my ability to understand.
  • June 22, 2012 - 6:22pm
    marye
    Joined:
    May 26, 2007
    but
    (yeesh, this is turning into a sidetrack...) I haven't thought of this in years, but when I first interviewed Hunter in '84, one of the things he talked about was how much he valued the fact that he was invisible enough that he could still go out and take walks around town and go out in public, and Jerry had long since not been able to do that, because even if people refrained from pouncing on him, he got, as Hunter put it, Noticed Hard. That HAS to take a toll. And that's just one thing.
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By request, the headlines and links to stories that grabbed your attention. Do not post full copyrighted stories here; they will be deleted. Just link to the source. Thanks!
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I was reading the LA Times today. I would like to share a link to the article, if you comment on it could you please cut and paste the article with your post so we know what we're talking about. And that we are talking about the same thing. Thanks :) XO http://www.latimes.com/features/health/mentalhealth/la-he-themd10-2009a… I believe in what this article is stating. I have been volunteering since I was 8 years old and will surely die a volunteer doing whatever is happening at that time. Maybe I'll come and make a list of some of the volunteering I've done. I really loved the Look Good Feel Better Program with the American Cancer Society. I cut and styled wigs for cancer patients. Men and women and taught them some make up tricks for their loss of eye brows so no one could even tell and would do skin toning with colors and things like that. My patients became best friends and I was oft invited to some of their passings. I have never taken a dime. I am forever proud and grateful that my favorite band and it's members and families and ALL feel so compassionate about giving and being so generous in so many various styles. The Grateful Dead and Family is Love! Wanna bet, I got proof, lots of it, XO! Altruism is one of the greatest words ever, to me.
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I was reading the NY Times and foundthis interesting article. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/13/us/catholic-bishops-urge-campaign-for… I think the article could be multi-purposed; for a comparison and show-case for other worthy circumstances. It stands alone for it's main purpose: rights and freedom. For the reader's of this edited post, a friend said it might B "too much". I did agree AND complied but only to make a point... If we comply in who are we? Certainly we are not ourselves, we are but someone-else. I have always liked being me "too much"... I can't imagine being anyone else, really. Call me freak just capitalize the F and make it a noun, thanks.
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I was reading a few newspaper articlesafter work tonight and I saw these... click on them if you'd like. I found them interesting. http://www.cnn.com/2012/04/12/world/americas/mexico-earthquakes/index.h… http://www.moneynews.com/Markets/Earthquake-Outbreak-Drilling-Wastewate… http://www.latimes.com/news/nation/nationnow/la-na-nn-florida-killer-ex… http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/5089.php Compared to a blood shot eyes, a nap and the munchies that's rough.
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I was reading the New York Times...AND found The Grateful Dead featured TODAY April 17th in the Year 2012! I am very pleased to read this. I am sher-ing it with you, here. It has The Grateful Dead and Family News links galore... ahhhh, good job NY Times! Don't miss out this link is fabulous. http://topics.nytimes.com/topics/reference/ timestopics/organizations/g/grateful_dead/index.html --------------TheNewYorkTimes------(----@
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very interesting collection of articles they've got there!
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found this Huffington Post piece. If you check it out --- do scroll down to the play box with the actual music in it. By using time-period pieces they are very beautiful. O Never Say I Was False Of Heart... is such a highlight but I loved them all. I have Shakespeare in the most finest of print and it's been a treasured gift; The cover of the book is crush red velvet and hours drift away at the unfolding of it. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/04/23/shakespeare-the-sonnets_n_1445… I"ll come back with some horror and evil later. I've no time for that as this day has been a spiraling light of good karma and much rain.
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Says the NYT. "Recordings of Donna Summer’s “I Feel Love,” Leonard Bernstein’s first performance with the New York Philharmonic, “Rapper’s Delight” by the Sugarhill Gang and a 1977 concert by the Grateful Dead are among the diverse entries that will be added to the National Recording Registry, the Library of Congress is to announce on Wednesday. "Selected for preservation because they are “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” the library said in a news release, the 25 sound recordings chosen this year include a CBS radio broadcast of a Nov. 14, 1943, concert given by the Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra of New York and conducted by Bernstein, who filled in when both Artur Rodzinski and Bruno Walter were unavailable; as well as the Grateful Dead’s May 8, 1977, performance at Cornell University’s Barton Hall, which the library said “has achieved almost mythic status among ‘Deadhead’ tape traders because of its excellent sound quality and early accessibility...”
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May 8, 1977, performance at Cornell University’s Barton Hall, which the library said “has achieved almost mythic status among ‘Deadhead’ tape traders because of its excellent sound quality and early accessibility...”
Excellent sound quality, no doubt, but I don't know what to make of "early accessibility". Primitive wheelchair ramps?
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...left in the country that still trusts Eric "F&F" Holder??
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Mike: Easy accessibility refers to the fact that this recording was widely available very early on. It got bootlegged as well. Dewlover: It isn't a matter of trust with Eric Holder. He hasn't uttered an original word since he became USAG. He does what he is told and what he is paid to do. A lot of it has been onerous but I am pleased that his department is challenging stringent new voter registration laws in red states.
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I just read what I thought was an interesting take on the new 14-disc DVD "All the Years Combine." Gonna guess it might weird some folks out. You can find it here: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2012/07/a-long-strange-trip… For what it's worth, I also did a blog review of the Atlantic review. I hope it's all right to post this address. My take is worth reading, though, if the Atlantic piece pisses you off. http://formalityoccurrence.blogspot.com/2012/06/almost-dead-head-james-…
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compared to Dave Marsh this guy is a pussycat.
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thanks for the link beyonder. it's funny reading this guy's perspective. he pretty much sums up the sneering, down-looking attitude of the mainstream. like i've always said, the grateful dead is an acquired taste and not many stuck around to acquire the taste or when they did appreciated it for what it was...
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enjoyed both articles, beyonder. "distressingly tiny shorts"...hehe
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In his essay "A Long, Strange Trip", James Parker finds the GD's performance of Fire on the Mountain in their video Dead Ahead to be
"Intolerably sad, yes, but it makes me feel better about the Dead and their people. I knew there had to be a low in there somewhere. Drug-tingles and swoopy dancing will only get you so far. To make the big-time connection, the one that lasts, you must confess to brokenness."
That sounds about right to me, except for the word intolerably. Sad, yes, but hardly intolerable, which Parker himself seems to concede in his acknowledgment of a connection made. Of that sadness, Beyonder writes in his blog The Formality of Occurrence,
I have to say, personally, "Far out, man. That's a new one. I never, ever thought of anything the bozos did as sad."
My thought upon reading that line went like this: Sweet William he is dead, pretty Peggy-O. In other words, I can't imagine the GD, or life itself, without sadness in the mix; otherwise, how do we know when we are feeling joy?
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Mr. Edwards. There really is something to that whole Yin Yang thing. It is impossible to define "good" without "bad" as a point of contrast. Homogeneity is the realm of the feeble-minded. Mosquitoes are unpleasant to have to deal with, but if they didn't fulfill some role in the biology mix, evolution would have dispensed with them long since. Never regret unpleasant occurrences, learn from them instead. Every touch of grey occurs inside a silver lining. As for Mr. Parker's analysis in The Atlantic, I found it curiously refreshing to get a non-Head's spin on it all. He so clearly did not want to like his assignment, but in the end, he couldn't quite get there. So props to him for choosing the Parachute mindset model.
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thought to write a piece at the level he felt most of his readers would be able to connect at. Perhaps he wrote at that level not to embarrass himself to his own social circle. Whatever, the superior attitude was not appealing. Is it not impolite to pass judgement on the Dead?
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is that when I came along in 1981, I had owned the first album since it came out, I was aware of the more obvious songs, etc. I had friends who were Deadheads. I had also run into people I considered nutballs whose eyes would glaze over with worshipful awe at the mention of Jerry Garcia. So when I got the direct experience, I certainly got the Garcia Whammy, all right, to the point that I turned myself into a journalist because I didn't see any other way I would get to talk to the guy. But from the get-go it was tempered by the feeling that he was carrying all these worshipful people and in a very real sense it was killing him. It was obvious, just walking in and feeling the sheer neediness of the scene, and being PART of the sheer neediness of the scene because that was the effect Jerry was stuck with having on people. So while I do not care what is tolerable for some dweeb at the Atlantic, I think there is some accuracy in noting that aspects of the scene were intolerable for Jerry. And history seems to have borne this out.
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Some interesting thoughts marye that I hadn't quite considered in that way before. The neediness of the scene- the "need" for a Grateful Dead guru to adulate. Maybe I've been (or am) guilty of it. Maybe Jerry felt similarly towards Neal Cassady? Personally, I never saw any more sadness in "Dead Ahead" than "The Grateful Dead Movie", or even "Sunshine Daydream" or "Festival Express". I mean, there was always an element of sadness in the music,no? Isn't that true of most great music, songs, and artists? Jerry always seemed so merry in interviews, but I'll never forget that interview with Robert Hunter, where he said about Jerry "there's always been a little bit of sadness somewhere in there, I think..." Just paraphasing from memory.
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I thought the scene where Jerry was trying to reason with the gatecrashers was quite telling. And what year was this? But I agree with you in not thinking any of the movies are "sadder" than the others (and of course how typical that this twit does not recognize, or bother to find out, who the breastfeeding woman is, sigh. The Atlantic has fallen on evil days). In some ways, that totally fabulous show we had in the theatres a month or so back had "sad" things--Brent looked like absolute hell and pretty much tore your heart out, but boy did he and Jer have the chemistry.... One of the things about the Dead in general and Hunter in particular is their ability to deal with paradox and carry numerous things and their contradictions at the same time. (Hey, we were ALL part of the neediness of the scene, we couldn't not be.)
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Yeah. Funny, I just remembered an interview with Jerry where he answered a rather philosophical question with "I don't think there is a good excuse for not being happy". Simple, but kinda pithy also. I'm sure he didn't mean "perfectly happy", though...
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that were possible!
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(yeesh, this is turning into a sidetrack...) I haven't thought of this in years, but when I first interviewed Hunter in '84, one of the things he talked about was how much he valued the fact that he was invisible enough that he could still go out and take walks around town and go out in public, and Jerry had long since not been able to do that, because even if people refrained from pouncing on him, he got, as Hunter put it, Noticed Hard. That HAS to take a toll. And that's just one thing.
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is one of the most expensive forms of capital available. Why some people covet it so is beyond my ability to understand.
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I can't post a link to the rest of this story as the site just streams a multitude of stories that that are impossible to find again. Here are a few of the beginning paragraphs. I posted it because it contrasts with how spoiled we are in this country. Rock, and the freedom to play/perform it, just seems to be a right like breathing air. Imagine if your band had to rehearse in an old outhouse... ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** ****** ***** In the far north-east of India, cut off from the rest of the country except via a narrow land bridge, perhaps the only way to make yourself heard is loud, really loud, rock music. For White Fire's drummer Elangbam Kumar, that explains why their cover version of the Guns'N'Roses song "Welcome To The Jungle" has become an anthem for the band and a big hit with their fans in the remote state of Manipur. The state, which is 1,000 miles (1,700 kilometres) from the capital New Delhi, borders on Myanmar and has struggled for decades with separatist violence, a society divided among competing tribes and grinding poverty. It is also an unlikely hub for rock and heavy metal music, boasting a burgeoning festival scene and local stars who have defied social and cultural boundaries to pursue their music. "All my pain and angst found an outlet in this genre of music. It is the attitude and the lyrics which are the biggest draw for us," 32-year-old Kumar, his tattooed biceps bulging out of a tight T-shirt. ***** ***** ***** ****** ****** ***** ***** ***** Anybody want to go to a festie or two in Manipur? Guaranteed to be more memorable than your last Bonaroo experience!
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rock on, young Kumar...
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It seems like an exercise in nostalgia. The Globe has an "A" quality comics section that includes Zippy; Doonesbury; Non-Sequitir. Then thee are the coupon sections where I'm able to make up the $4 of the cover price. I could get most of it on-line without any environmental impact but it there is something visceral about holding the paper in my hands. Dissecting it, discarding those sections (auto, real-estate, Parade Margazin) tht won't be perused. Tomorrow I'll get the final recap on a story for the Superbowl that hasn't really changes for two weeks. In this day and age where getting news in the most timely fashion, sometimes there is the odd story where a greater or lesser amount of perspective can be summed up or totaled in a "current" fashion. I am holding in my hand the blow-up of the "Bizarro" (12/16/12) comic in which there is an old-time propaganda scene of Mao holding up his little red book which is now emblazoned with the letters "LMAO". I'm left wondering if it isn't worth buying the paper on the odd Sunday. Yeahh, I guess I will...
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It through the grapevine.
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"Jerry Garcia may be most closely linked in many people’s mind with the Haight-Ashbury, but the Grateful Dead front man and San Francisco native actually grew up in another neighborhood — and the supervisor who represents that area wants to make sure he’s remembered there. "Supervisor John Avalos introduced a resolution Tuesday that would let the city install commemorative street plaques in front of 121 Amazon Avenue, where Garcia lived with his parents until he was 5, and 87 Harrington Street, where he and his brother lived with their grandparents after his father’s accidental death."... More at http://blog.sfgate.com/cityinsider/2014/07/29/jerry-garcia-childhood-homes-may-be-commemorated/