Grateful Dead

In and Out of the Garden He Goes...

So after getting a fairly gratifying amount of long-overdue yard work done over the holiday weekend, I am getting a big kick out of the fact that decades' worth of chance-acquired plants are starting to look like they belong together. And then in another topic JurassicBlueberries was holding forth on the care and feeding of blueberry plants, and what with one thing and another, I bet we've got gardeners here. Let's talk!

(PS: Folks, this should probably go without saying, but if your gardening efforts involve the cultivation of plants illegal in your jurisdiction, please do not post about them here. For all practical purposes, everyone in the world can read what you post here, and that definitely includes your local law enforcement. Or your not-so-local law enforcement. Or your mama. Silence is golden.)

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marye's picture
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Joined: May 26 2007
meanwhile

all the cacti that needed repotting have now been moved to larger quarters. This process was complicated by the fact that, this being Oakland, an unusual selection of opportunistic plants had taken up residence in the pots, most notably a flock of baby redwood trees and, much to my amazement, a baby maidenhair fern that was emerging from the drainage hole of one of the pots. I was pretty worried they were too delicate to make the transition. But after several weeks, the baby redwoods are robust and growing, and the baby maidenhair, while very tiny, is definitely sending out new shoots.

Yes, they are going to look pretty funny growing up with Bumpy the mutant Peruvian cactus, but that's the Oakland garden for you.

marye's picture
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Joined: May 26 2007
I love carnations

but I've never had much luck growing them, for some reason.

Sunshine-daydream1951 told us that in Spain they have CLIMBING carnations. Does it get any better...

docks of the city's picture
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Joined: Jun 19 2007
little pink carnations

This last week all my little carnations are coming into bloom, here on the southern Oregon coast. The scent of them floating around the garden and into the house is so nice. I've been growing them for about 4 years. No maintence, but they are delicate - when weeding I often pull a piece of the plant out by mistake. I tuck in somewhere else and it thrives there. Plant carnations - they love you back.

marye's picture
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Joined: May 26 2007
wow

pix!

Nothing like mangos in the garden here, but the flowers are definitely out in force.

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Joined: Jun 9 2007
Summer

Well its summer in Miami that means a low of 80 and a high of 92-94 with 100% humidity. I do little gardening-mostly cut the grass and in the early morning a little weeding. We had a huge crop of mangos the best in over 20 years. I have 3 large mango trees in my yard and 3 avocado trees. I have given away probably 300 mangos to friends and customers.Was walking in the back yard and came upon 2 black racers wrapped up in a ball of snake love. They could have cared less about me. Lots of flowers and misquitos.
This is the time of the year (actually they peaked about 3 weeks ago) when all of the pointseanna trees flower and Miami is awash in bright orange, yellow and purple trees.

And the road goes on forever....
BobbaLee

c_c
c_c's picture
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Joined: Jun 4 2007
compost grubs

if you have the 'bad' type of grubs in your compost, best to put that compost in a closed plastic bag and set it in the sun for 12 hours or so to kill them before adding the compost to your garden. if you are not sure which are the 'bad grubs in compost, take a few to your garden shop to show them and ask.

peace.

c_c
c_c's picture
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Joined: Jun 4 2007
grubs

yup, some birds love grubs...

so get more grub-eating birds to your yard with water, nesting and feeders. some species of birds, like European starlings, blue-jays, purple martins, crows, grackles, meadowlarks, cardinals, blackbirds and robins all eat grubs. Starlings, robins and cardinals will also eat adult Japanese beetles. You can run a rake over 'grubby' areas (pun intended) to help turn up emerging grubs for visiting birds.

OR

ask someone in your garden shop about this stuff:

Apply Parasitic Nematodes. Upon penetrating a grub, the nematode inoculates the grub with the bacteria. The bacteria reproduce quickly, feeding on the grub tissue. The nematode then feeds on this bacteria and progresses through its own life cycle, reproducing and ultimately killing the grub. Heterorhabditis bacteriophora is a type of commercially available nematode for grubs.

Milky Spore. This is a bacterium once ate by grubs, builds up in their blood, eventually causing their demise. It's considered a long term solution and is usually used in areas experiencing severe infestations. Its needs to be applied over the course of a couple of seasons (2-4 years) in order for it to build up in the soil. After that, it is supposed to last for a decade or longer. Ask your local garden center or extension office where to get milky spore in your area.

the cheap way:

use a glass beer bottle or slass pop bottle. Leave a little beer (what a waste) or soda pop in them. It appears these 'grubby buggers' (poor attempt at a British pun intended) love this stuff. your very own Grub Motel, they crawl in & can't get out, so they drown. leave a bottle on its side, or bury it down a bit so the opening is at ground level... so they can get in easy but the pop or beer cant get out.

grubby buggers!

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Joined: Nov 21 2007
freebird914

Don`t know if your town allows it but chickens eat grubs, and other pests . but you may have to have some type of fence around each plant so the chickens don`t dig them up looking for the grubs .
not to mention you get some nice composte from the chickens .
hope this helps you . Happy gardening !!

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Joined: Jun 16 2007
Help Please

Anyone one know what tro use to get rid of grubs without killing the soil or self It's for my vegetable garden....

lamagonzo (not verified)
The Garden Song (Pete Seeger)

Inch by inch, row by row,
Please bless these seeds I sow.
Please keep them safe below
Till the rain comes tumblin' down.
Pullin' weeds and pickin' stones
We are made of dreams and bones.
Need a spot to call my own
Cause the time is close at hand.
Grain for grain, sun and rain
I'll find my way in nature's chain
Tune my body and my brain
To the music of the land.

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In and Out of the Garden He Goes...