Grateful Dead

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c_c
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to live and die in LA

laying in bed, I finally remembered this movie, the counterfit money movie. I was going nuts, kind of confusing the title in my mind with Less Than Zero, which is another really cool movie (but a much better book) by the by...

glad to see, GRTUD, you are back to your old self...

bite the bullit on that one, if you would.

peace.

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Golden Road???

In case anyone was wondering, I'm logged in as Golden Road because someone brought to my attention a 1987 Philly Spectrum concert was dated incorrectly and I posted a comment from my experience which was slated to be removed. I logged in as my new, old, new self only to find that a PM had been sent to that effect. I simply forgot to log out and in as my new, old, new, old self. In case anyone was wondering (I really wasn't trying to fluff the image of this thread....)

"Who the fuck are the Knutsens?"

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Bullitt

Great movie! One of my favs as a kid. I saw this at the movie theater and really felt like I was in that car going up and down the hills of SF. Years later when I actually went to SF I could appreciate the thrills all over again.

"This aggression will not stand, man....."

c_c
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here's a link

http://www.jingai.com/yakuza/movies.html

http://www.sarudama.com/japanese_movies/yakuza_tough_guy/index.shtml

c_c
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Kurosawa revisited

yeah, I think he showed a bit too much of the under-belly of post war Japan is another reason, unfortunately my 'source' for free sub-titled Kurosawa films dried up years ago but it was great while it lasted.... I saw most of his early stuff, but not too many in the 70's or 80's genre. I always prefered his modern set films, especially the ones with gangsters or evil do-ers. but I dug Yojimbo, too. have you ever seen any Japanese Yakuza fims? (a lot were made in the 1970's) many are kind of cheesy, but they are an interesting sub-culture.

I'll try to find 'Dreams'

peace.

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Joined: Jun 5 2007
has anyone ever seen to

has anyone ever seen to live ad die in L.A.? it has a car chase scene that is up there with bullitt(another classic) and french connection(yet another classic)...did steve mcqueen ever make a bad movie?
lebowski is in the coen triple play of raising arizona and fargo..."I'll take these here Huggies and any money that you might have in the register."

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re; Kurosawa & Scorsese

Hey CC, I really like After Hours too. One of Scorsese's underrated films along with King of Comedy.
As for Kurosawa, the Japanese critics were always hard on Kurosawa because his films were thought to be too "western." Yojimbo is essentially a Samurai western. His favorite director was John Ford. Anyway, he didn't do much in the '70s after his suicide attempt. He did get funding from the USSR for the little seen Dersu Urzula. It's really a good film. Well, his comeback was spurred by Scorsese, Lucas, and Coppola personally funding 1980's Kagemusha, which was something of a dress-rehearsal for Ran. Incidentally, Scorsese makes a cameo in Kurosawa's 1990 film Dreams. It's a beautifully strange film. He literally filmed his dreams. Interesting.

Yo Soy Boricua!

c_c
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Kurosawa

http://www.sensesofcinema.com/contents/directors/02/kurosawa.html

I had the great opportunity years back to see almost all of Kurosawa's films, some that I really liked:

Drunken Angel (1948),

The Quiet Duel (1949).

Stray Dog (1949

Scandal (1950)

and there was another I liked called Dodeskaden (1970) about a semi retarded boy who loved trains... I just read on the above link website, it was panned by the Japanese critics and Kurosawa attempted suicide because of that. fuck the critics, I thought it was great.

and Scorcese is the master of American film in my book, almost everyone has seen Goodfellas, but I also really like After Hours.

http://www.sensesofcinema.com/contents/directors/02/scorsese.html

peace.

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Some of my favs

Film studies is kind of a hobby of mine. It would take too long to list all of my favorites, and if you asked me tomorrow, my list would look very different. Here are a few of my favorites in no particular order:

NASHVILLE (Robert Altman-1975) Arguably Altman's masterpiece (Macabe & Mrs. Miller and Short Cuts being the other "great" Altman films), and one of the great movies about America in the '70's It also speaks presciently about the world today as well. "It don't worry me", indeed.

RAN (Akira Kurosawa-1985) Kurosawa is my favorite director, and all of his films are favorites of mine, but this is simply one of the greatest films of all time. Kurosawa re-imagines Shakespeare's King Lear in 16th century Japan. The hubris of man. Shot entirely in deep focus with drenching color, this film is beautiful to look at as well. The first major battle scene was Spielberg's inspiration for the opening of Saving Private Ryan. Of course Kurosawa's films have always inspired western directors: Lucas used Hidden Fortress as the basis for Star Wars, Yojimbo was remade into A Fist Full of Dollars, The Seven Samarui was remade into The Magnificent Seven.

THE THIRD MAN (Carol Reed-1947) Post War Berlin. Intrigue! Surprises! Mystery! Weird camera angles! Orson Welles, a ferris wheel, and the coo coo clock speech! Also a killer zither musical score (that's right, I said a killer zither score!)

MODERN TIMES (Charlie Chaplin-1936) My favorite Chaplin film. This is one of the funniest movies you'll ever see. The mix-up in the prison when The Tramp accidentally get high on cocaine is hilarious. The first time I saw it I almost peed my pants.

AMARCORD (Frederico Fellini-1973) I am not that big a fan of Fellini, but this film knocked my socks off. A sentimental, funny, and hallucinatory remembrance of growing up in early Mussolini Italy (The title means "I Remember").

DISCREET CHARM OF THE BOURGEOISIE (Luis Bunuel-1972) Bunuel was the king of film surrealism, and social criticism. Also recommended by Bunuel: The Exterminating Angel, Un Chien Andelu and L'Age D'Or (The last two were made with Salvador Dali in 1928 and were banned for like 60 years. Andelu has the famous shot of a woman's eye getting sliced.)

THE WILD BUNCH (Sam Peckinpah-1969) If you like shootouts in your westerns, it doesn't get any better than this.

BRAZIL (Terry Gilliam-1985) Gilliam's wacky and epic masterpiece. A funny and surreal fable about the emptiness of"modern" life. Make sure you see the director's cut.

RAGING BULL (Martin Scorsese-1980) The most visceral character study I've ever seen. It is a damn perfect film.

THE NATURAL (Barry Levinson-1984) Adapted from the brilliant Bernard Malamud novel, this film mixes motifs from classical mythology with American and baseball mythology. It works better than you might think.

Yo Soy Boricua!

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Hell Yeah, farbie!

Tommy Boy is an awesome movie! One of my all time favorites.
'Cmon ya'll this was a good thread on the old boards. Anyone seen the new "Pirates" movie? How 'bout the new "Die Hard" that comes out today?

"What we seem to have here, is a failure to communicate!"

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Bigger Than A Drive-In Movie, Ooo-whee!