Grateful Dead

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Anna rRxia's picture
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Joined: Dec 25 2009
The Tortured

Interesting premise: A couple's four-year old son is tortured to death by a kidnapper. He is caught and gets off with a relatively light sentence. The mother is all broken up. The father is emotionally distraught, though less so.

They set about for revenge of the eye-to-eye method. Crashing the prison transfer van and then transferring the prisoner to thre basement of an old, abandoned farmhouse where they begin the process of torture. They have all the implements and drugs and know-hoe to keep their prisoner alive, as well as the cruder tools.

The wife negins to have misgivings upon watching their prisoner suffer. The prisoner escapes and ultimately hangs himself, but not before an element of doubt is introduced that they have the right man as there were two in the prisoner van.

This was good case study in raw human emotion and what would likely happen if people acted on their impulses and the mistakes that ciuld easily happen.

Anna rRxia's picture
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Lincoln

The movie Lincoln is a good chronicle of how the 13th amendment to the Constitution was passed. It intertwines scenes from the Civil War with the political drama going on in House of Reps. to get the 2/3ds majority needed to pass an amendment. The actor who plays Lincoln gives an excellent performance spinning his stories with folksy charm.

Lincoln has won his second term and goes for broke on the 13th Amendment as the war is winding down in Jan. of 1865. The mood in Congress is grim as 600,000 people have fought and died and the Democrats want an end to the war at all costs. The Republicans (a far different party than the one we have today), led by Lincoln, want the amendment to make sure when southern states rejoin the union after the war they don't vote slavery back in. What purpose the war and all those dead, reasons Lincoln...

He has an uphill battle in the House and is twenty votes short,18 of which he gets with patronage positions and various nefarious political arm-twisting. He is 2 votes short and thunders to his political handlers that he is the most powerful man on earth and they should get him those two votes. In reality, this is probably where the cash hit the table for an outright bribe. Lincoln also makes misrepresentations to Congress that he knows of no Confederate negotiating party wishing to the end the war,which he himself has initiated and is holding up on a riverboat somewhere in Virginia.

Lincoln was a lawyer and a politician and the polishing of his image as almost a perfectly ethical man rings false. The lines written for Mary Todd Lincoln ring false at many times also. In the end, Lincoln pays with his life for his political legacy.

A film worth seeing.

Randall Lard's picture
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Joined: Jul 30 2012
Dummy Jim

Matt Hulse

Dummy Jim Trailer from Matt Hulse on Vimeo.

Jim hails from Cairnbulg, a close-knit community on the North East Coast of Scotland, neighbouring Inverallochy. Folk here are descended from proud, hardworking Scottish fishermen.

Locally Jim is well-known as 'Dummy Jim', or simply 'The Dummy'.

A wee while ago he set forth alone on a Continental cycling tour which might have taken him from Scotland to Spain and Gibralter, and finally to Morocco.
However, he encountered difficulties on route. He took a route Northwards, in a direction that eventually led him to the Arctic Circle.

"If you want to make God laugh, tell him your plans."

Jim kept a journal of these Continental experiences that was published in 1955 with the title 'I Cycled Into The Arctic Circle', under his proper name - James Duthie.

There has since been a beautiful website inspired by Jim's trip and an extraordinary album by The One Ensemble & Sarah Kenchington. There's also a Limited Edition artists' book that commemorates the 60th anniversary of his trip.
In 2012 a feature film will be completed, starring deaf actor Samuel Dore, released along with a richly illustrated reprint of the original journal.

DUMMY JIM IS HAPPENING -

In May 1951 a profoundly deaf 30 year old Scotsman called James Duthie – known to his local community as ‘Dummy Jim’ – cycled solo on a return trip from the small fishing town of Cairnbulg in the north east of Scotland to the Arctic Circle.
The round trip of 6000+ miles took three months and was managed on a budget of just £12.
On returning to Scotland, Duthie wrote about his travels and in 1955 a slim volume called ‘I Cycled into the Arctic Circle’ was published. James sold copies of the book door to door to cover the cost of future excursions.

Sadly the cyclist was killed in a road accident in 1965.

In 2000, artist Matt Hulse received a copy of the book from his mother, who had unearthed the hidden gem whilst working at a second hand bookshop on Iona. Inspired by the journal’s eccentricity and genuine warmth, Matt decided to set about making a film of James Duthie’s unique story.
A year later the wheels were set in motion with the blessing of an SAC Creative Scotland Award.

http://dummyjim.com/
https://www.facebook.com/DummyJim

Matt Hulse -

http://vimeo.com/anormalboy
http://anormalboy.wordpress.com/

Come rain or shine, friend or foe, hill or flat, puncture or no, Matt and his team have not stopped pedalling.

Randall Lard's picture
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Joined: Jul 30 2012
La Cabina

Antonio Mercero

marye's picture
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Joined: May 26 2007
The Other Dream Team

In theaters now! Check it out!
Grateful Dead! Lithuania! Basketball! Freedom! Tie-dyes!
SF Chronicle review

Randall Lard's picture
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Joined: Jul 30 2012
Amplified Gesture

an introduction to free improvisation: practitioners and their philosophy

Directed and edited by: Phil Hopkins. With: Otomo Yoshihide, Toshimaru Nakamura, Christian Fennesz, Keith Rowe, Eddie Prévost, Sachiko M., Evan Parker, John Tilbury, Werner Dafeldecker, Michael Moser and John Butcher.

Produced by: Adrian Molloy for Opium (Arts) Ltd. Executive Producer: David Sylvian. Music: Excerpts from Manafon by David Sylvian, © 2009 Samadhisound llc.

Randall Lard's picture
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La Cicatrice Intérieure

Philippe Garrel

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Joined: Feb 3 2012
The Death of the Hollywood Blockbuster

My wife and I went to the movies yesterday to see "Raiders of the Lost Ark" in IMAX and paid $13 per ticket. The sad part is that we were far more excited to pay extra and see a movie we've collectively seen at least 100 times than see any of the new movies available at the theater.

Randall Lard's picture
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Joined: Jul 30 2012
Berberian Sound Studio

Excellent new film by Peter Strickland.
With sound design from Steven Stapleton and Andrew Liles.

Randall Lard's picture
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The Girl Chewing Gum

John Smith
UK, 1976, 12 minutes
B&W, Sound (Optical), 16mm ,Video

'In The Girl Chewing Gum an authoritative voice-over pre-empts the events occurring in the image, seeming to order not only the people, cars and moving objects within the screen but also the actual camera movements operated on the street in view. In relinquishing the more subtle use of voice-over in television documentary, the film draws attention to the control and directional function of that practice: imposing, judging, creating an imaginary scene from a visual trace. This 'Big Brother' is not only looking at you but ordering you about as the viewer's identification shifts from the people in the street to the camera eye overlooking the scene. The resultant voyeurism takes on an uncanny aspect as the blandness of the scene (shot in black and white on a grey day in Hackney) contrasts with the near 'magical' control identified with the voice. The most surprising effect is the ease with which representation and description turn into phantasm through the determining power of language.' - Michael Maziere.

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Bigger Than A Drive-In Movie, Ooo-whee!