Grateful Dead

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Also

There are some real sentimental attachments to some of the cassettes. Lots of love went into making them back in the day and there is something to be said for keeping that particular version of a show that you went to the trouble of trading for. Especially in the days before all the internet and computer stuff. I would for example try to fill every possible minute of a tape with fillers and played around with painstaking fade ins and fade outs all done by hand. All that work makes the tapes that much more special and unique. While the internet has allowed for an increased availability of shows, I think people take for granted that in the old days to get shows was really something special and something to cherish. Now it is almost too easy and I believe that certain things that were unique to each show are lost by the shear numbers of what is available. That being said, all this music is truly a gift and a lifelong hobby that I've enjoyed and will keep on enjoying.

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Yeah, iagree

Thanks, Mr.Fantasy.....unfortunatly most of mine are all 90's so the struggle to edit continues,plus....and I know it's a sin, a majority of my tapes are 2nd set only. But it is kinda fun to try to put the puzzle together so to speak. But, I'm having fun and really that's what it is all about.keep on truckin!

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30 West Chicago Ave. #408
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41° 53' 48.0444" N, 87° 37' 45.9336" W
Joined: Jun 9 2007
lossless files

...shall we go, you and I while we can...

I'm always interested in how the band actually played it and how the sbd or aud recording of the show sounded. I still maintain that using the torrent approach not only does this, but gives you a wider range of show choices. And, if you have a high speed connection and a good internal burner, it's not too hard to get it going.Remember that folks have gone a long way to get the best possible recording of these torrented shows for distribution.

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Fred Williams Response

Fred,

The majority of what I am transferring is 110's....

....I don't know about your particular recording habits....but it seems like the Dead never filled up an entire 110 with one set....

...easy solution....

Two Cd's per show. That is how I do it.
Plus having that "Set break" gives me a chance to check out the next set to see if I need to tweak my EQ any (Because my original recordings ((My dads tapes)) almost always have different levels from first to second set).

Of course some level differences between separate tapes of the same show could have been the original mixing done by the Dead. I.E. At set break Bobby might have said...I want my vocals raised/lowered or Jerry could have wanted more Phil (God knows why...)

Make us SNAPPY!

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amccuskey response

Yes, that all sounds very nice, but how much real control do you have over your music?

And aren't you limited by your computers hardware/interfaces at some point?

I put my Cd's onto my computer after I make my Master copy. But I don't like the idea of only having my archives stored on PC only...in case of a crash.

That makes me NERVOUS!

Make us SNAPPY!

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tapes into discs

I've found the old fashioned way is best, but VERY time consuming. I ran a tapedeck through a graphic EQ then into a cd burner. You do have to listen to the tape and make breaks for track listings, but if there are a bunch of songs running into eachother,I'll just let it go and there is a problem with editing. Most of my tapes are on 90 mins, cd's only go up to 80 mins , so you have to do some editing if you want to fit all onto a disk. however my sound quality did not suffer as bad as i thought it would. My problem is having to lug around 500 or so tapes. If there is an easier way, I would love to learn how to do it.

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tapes to disc

I used Final Vinyl on my Mac(available at an Mac Store). You can run a tape player into computer via USB port. Once the show is loaded you can create individual song files out of the whole show. Transfer these files into Itunes. From there you can create CDs and also have a back up on your hard drive or external hard drive depending on where you store your music. Really easy to use and sounds great. I am up to about 250g on my external drive with ability to play over stereo at home or transfer shows to Ipod for road trips.

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Correction* I use Analog to

Correction*

I use Analog to XLR patch cables out of my dads Nakamichi cassette deck Into the Behringer...

If anyone cares...

Make us SNAPPY!

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HOW I RECORD TAPES TO CDS!!

KJ7XJ- Thanks for the reply, I am researching Neumann mics right now, but I will keep your recommendations in mind.

Now,

I have seen a lot of people talking about transferring your old dead tapes to cds...

And everyone has this mythology or mystique about it.

My dad has over 600 tapes that I am steadily transferring to Cds with High quality results.

Here is how I do it...

I use my dad's old Nakamichi cassette deck analog cables out ->

Into my Behringer Ultragraph Pro EQ, XLR to analog patch cables out ->

Into my brand new TEAC CD Recorder.

It is an EXTREMELY simple operation that (thanks to the good people at Behringer) makes a very nice sounding CD.

The downsides are as follows. (but more on the definition of "downsides" later)

You have to listen to your tape all the way through while making your CD, i.e. I press play on my cassette deck, then start recording on my Cd Recorder then I listen to the first song until then end then I press the Record button to start/split to the next track.

After the tape is done you press two buttons to "Finalize" the disc, and after one minute ten seconds your Cd is ready to play!

Also my TEAC does not have independent left and right recording volume control. However this is simply solved by using the input controls on the Equalizer (EQ) ((Very simple to use and you can gets great sounds very easily))

And back to the definition of downsides....

Having to listen through the track is actually a benefit for me in many ways. I get to listen to everything that is going on, make sure every second of my recording sounds great. Actually instead of pressing the Record button on my Cd Recorder to split/start the next track I can press Stop or Pause and Listen to the next track through before I record it...I can easily adjust the Input levels, some High and Low cut, and adjust my 31 band EQ to perfection on each track!

To me this is a great setup, easy to run, quality results, and I probably spent under $500 to get started.

And man is it sweet once you get that first disc finalized...and you listen to the amazing sound that you have just updated, improved, and preserved it is a very satisfying moment!!!

~Make us SNAPPY!~

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Microphone afterthought....

I forgot about Bob Heil....

http://www.heilsound.com

Eric

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