Grateful Dead

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Joined: Jun 5 2011
The reply - clocking in at __ 10 months later?

Hi. a long time coming & I'm sure obsolete reply, but a book I would recommend is James A. Mitcheners' The Drifters. It's release date is 1971..and it's subject matter is, in a nut-shell young American Beatniks traveling around Spain & Northern Africa. In my opinion I think it's safe to say it's Beat-inspired. And a reflection of the times: U.S. Civil unrest, Politics, drug use.
A departure somewhat for Mitchener, but enjoyable. Or perhaps the better expression is relatable? I'm a very big fan of his prose.

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Joined: Jun 5 2011
re: Just Kids

Nift. I'm glad you mentioned it. I've known about this for awhile but like many things on the to-do list back-burnerd' it out of site. Great Book Cover (Hardcover)

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Joined: May 26 2007
love that book!

and was lucky enough to catch Sam on his booksigning tour a while back. I agree, it's a very interesting read. The Lenny Hart story alone...

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Joined: Jun 4 2007
You Can't Always Get What You Want...

...A book written by the former road manager for the Rolling Stones and the Grateful Dead, Sam Cutler. It was briefly mentioned by David Lemieux in the Seaside Chat announcement for DaP 10. As is my wont with this particular book, I'm finding myself skipping around and reading a chapter or a group of chapters here and there. The chapters are short, the typeface and spacing rather large, making it an easy and quick read.
I would recommend this book as a companion to DaP 6 and DaP 10. It provides clues as to the mental space which the band and crew may have been in subsequent to the Altamont debacle. The first hand accounts of the exploits on the road are quite interesting as well. The right wingers would be very confused by the picture on the back cover...

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Joined: Jun 4 2007
Please Be With Me

Galadrielle Allman's well-researched and touching look into her dad's life. I really liked it and recommend it highly to all fans of the ABB and especially Duane.

The peach don't fall far from the tree.

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Joined: Feb 26 2014
Inferno by Dan Brown. It was

Inferno by Dan Brown. It was a mystery novel.

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Joined: Jun 4 2007
Tripwire

Love reading a good Lee Child book, Jack Reacher is always getting into something. Also reading the bio on Gaston Glock, the Austrian who designed the world famous Glock pistols. I'm always into something, and do some writing as well.

marye's picture
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Joined: May 26 2007
in the line of duty

(I review books for Common Sense Media, among other things), I had occasion to read the recently published "The Last Wild" by Piers Torday. Kids, animals, post-apocalyptic world, etc. I.e. all the basic elements you've seen a zillion times already, but not like this. In this it has a certain family resemblance to the book the author's dad wrote as a first novel at age 60, "Salmon Fishing in the Yemen." (Haven't read the book yet, think the movie is on the short list of Best Things Ever.)

Anyway, it's the beginning of what looks like a very promising series. Ostensibly for 8-year-olds but maybe a little intense for a lot of them; adults will not be bored...

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Joined: Apr 2 2014
News

Just started "News" by Alain de Botton. The sensationalization of news, the media, biased networks and newspapers left and right, it's hard to even subject my nervous system to it. Botton looks at the news from the perspective of history as well as relating current events and individual foibles to plots and characters from literature. I like that it's illustrated with photos related to the subject without the feeling of a boring textbook. Botton's books always push a regular guy like me to think outside my box. On the lighter side I'm alternating with the latest in the series of coffee house mysteries, "Billionaire Blend" by Cleo Coyle. Love the series.... and each book includes great coffee and dessert recipes.

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Joined: Dec 16 2013
Dirty Wars

by Jeremy Scahill. "The World is a Battlefield"

This is the true story of drone warfare around the world. It is a big heavy book. Depressing to those who did not know the United States has been carrying out war crimes for years. Now a movie at the Sundance Film Festival. I found out about this book on FSTV, free speech TV. It is on satellite but not cable, because it is not corporate. It is on the net. freespeechtv.org. Check out "Democracy Now". It is non-corporate, non-profit TV.

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