Grateful Dead

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franco8's picture
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Joined: Feb 26 2014
Inferno by Dan Brown. It was

Inferno by Dan Brown. It was a mystery novel.

Coconut Phil's picture
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Joined: Jun 4 2007
Tripwire

Love reading a good Lee Child book, Jack Reacher is always getting into something. Also reading the bio on Gaston Glock, the Austrian who designed the world famous Glock pistols. I'm always into something, and do some writing as well.

marye's picture
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Joined: May 26 2007
in the line of duty

(I review books for Common Sense Media, among other things), I had occasion to read the recently published "The Last Wild" by Piers Torday. Kids, animals, post-apocalyptic world, etc. I.e. all the basic elements you've seen a zillion times already, but not like this. In this it has a certain family resemblance to the book the author's dad wrote as a first novel at age 60, "Salmon Fishing in the Yemen." (Haven't read the book yet, think the movie is on the short list of Best Things Ever.)

Anyway, it's the beginning of what looks like a very promising series. Ostensibly for 8-year-olds but maybe a little intense for a lot of them; adults will not be bored...

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Joined: Apr 2 2014
News

Just started "News" by Alain de Botton. The sensationalization of news, the media, biased networks and newspapers left and right, it's hard to even subject my nervous system to it. Botton looks at the news from the perspective of history as well as relating current events and individual foibles to plots and characters from literature. I like that it's illustrated with photos related to the subject without the feeling of a boring textbook. Botton's books always push a regular guy like me to think outside my box. On the lighter side I'm alternating with the latest in the series of coffee house mysteries, "Billionaire Blend" by Cleo Coyle. Love the series.... and each book includes great coffee and dessert recipes.

cray cray's picture
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Joined: Dec 16 2013
Dirty Wars

by Jeremy Scahill. "The World is a Battlefield"

This is the true story of drone warfare around the world. It is a big heavy book. Depressing to those who did not know the United States has been carrying out war crimes for years. Now a movie at the Sundance Film Festival. I found out about this book on FSTV, free speech TV. It is on satellite but not cable, because it is not corporate. It is on the net. freespeechtv.org. Check out "Democracy Now". It is non-corporate, non-profit TV.

slo lettuce's picture
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Joined: Jul 20 2012
Dawn and Mary...

by Brian Doyle. This is a beautifully written short essay in The Sun magazine about the two, true "first responders" at Sandy Hook Elementary almost one year ago to the day. Before the first call to the police had even happened and with all of the fear and adrenaline that one could imagine, these two incredibly brave women tried to stop Adam Lanza as he entered the school and they paid with their lives. It only takes a few minutes to read and I hope that you do.

http://thesunmagazine.org/issues/452/dawn_and_mary

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Joined: Jun 13 2007
------------------(-----@

Puzzle Island

Devised, written and illustrated by~
Paul Adshead

This book is a Parent's Choice approved
children's book. Looking for a gift that
will bring hours of enjoyment while
providing a mental work out; this book
is a gem! Adshead's art work is awesome
and the journey you'll take through his
book is excellent.

Had to sher this one, it's a good one.

ISBN 0-85953-402-2 (hard cover, I recommend it)
ISBN 0-85953-403-0 (soft cover)
Library of Congress Number 91-33416

Published by Child's Play (International) Limited

unkle sam's picture
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Joined: Oct 3 2008
the "affordable care act"

reading this right now, very hard read, lots of words, but basically it says "bend over", the only ones to get anything out of this is the insurance companies and the irs, oh yeah, and all the employers that will drop all of their full time workers and hire part time so they won't have to pay for their insurance. This is way scarier than any Stephen King novel I've ever read.
One option is to pay a fine if you don't have insurance, but if you don't make enough annually you won't have to pay a fine if you don't have insurance, the gov will pay it for you and supply you with health care. Am I reading this right?
So, you will get rewarded if you stop being a productive member of society.
Doesn't look too good for the average Joe who is healthy, looks like you will be paying for everybody else who is sick, or about to die, or who just figured out that if they don't work, make little to no income, none of this will pertain to them. This can't be right, better reread those last 100 or so pages.

marye's picture
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Joined: May 26 2007
all of which reminds me

of Jerry Pournelle, an irascible right-wing writer of what might be considered irascible right-wing science fiction, who I like a lot.

Back in the day, Pournelle being rather big in the computer world as well as the science fiction world, we scored a cover-story interview with him, which was pretty nice of him. And then, in one of those moments that give every editor screaming nightmares, it came out. With his name misspelled on the cover.

He was pretty nice about it, considering. The next time I saw him, I think it was at Worldcon in SF, he was signing copies of his latest book. When I got to the head of the line, he duly inscribed a book and handed it over.

Every word of the inscription was misspelled.

I cherish that book.

marye's picture
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Joined: May 26 2007
yeah

as with Stephen King, I don't love the genre and its trappings, but one has to give props to a master of the craft.

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