• 203 replies
    izzie
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    Red Whiskey - it's not the only thing for dinner, is it? What's cookin', FoodieHeads?

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  • October 12, 2015 - 11:39pm
    Randall Lard
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    July 30, 2012
    Means Nothing To No Way
    Husband: "How long does it take to boil an egg?"Wife: "3 minutes." Husband: "What, on both sides?"
  • October 11, 2015 - 7:46pm
    rgergelis
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    @wilfredtjones
    ...the preceding was brought to you by Lipitor and cardiovascular surgeons everywhere... I'm sure it tastes great :-)
  • October 11, 2015 - 7:22pm
    wilfredtjones
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    June 4, 2007
    an unsolicited tip
    Straight from the kitchen of wilfredtjones: Find yourself some bacon fat, and some leftover pizza. Heat up a pan (be it inside or on the grill) and about 2 big T's of the fat, once the pan and fat are hot carefully slap the pizza onto the pan. Sauté enough to bring the crust to a golden color, taking care not to burn the crust. Employ a cover to get the cheese and toppings melted to your liking. You will never believe how far a little bacon fat will go to revive that lifeless leftover pizza. Yow to wow in 5 minutes flat! Enjoy.
  • March 25, 2015 - 6:37am
    motoman615
    Joined:
    February 9, 2015
    great morning energy juice
    This is for a large pitcher of juice so adjust accordingly. All organic 10 med carrots 4 stalks celery 6 granny smith apples 1 red beet peeled with greens and stalks 1 lemon 4 stalks kale Enjoy!
  • January 29, 2015 - 7:22pm
    wilfredtjones
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    June 4, 2007
    on the menu tonight
    One frozen dinner: Amy's Vegetable Korma & 2 beers (Deschutes Obsidian Stout and Sierra Nevada Torpedo).
  • July 9, 2012 - 8:36am
    Anonymous (not verified)
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    cake or death
    one moist chocolate pudding. you will need 1 bar of dark (85%) organic chocolate 60g organic butter 1 tbsp organic honey 50g organic cocoa 20g self raising flour 3 free range organic eggs 120g organic light muscovado sugar 70ml organic double cream handful of pecan nuts turn on the oven melt dark chocolate bar with the butter add the tbsp of honey add the coca powder with the flour and sift together to ensure any pesky lumps are smoothed take the eggs and the sugar and whisk until the consistency of double cream add the melted chocolate mixture and fold in gently add the 70ml of double cream and fold in gently add the flour/cocoa powder combo and fold in gently add your nuts take a 7" wide by 2 and 3/4" circular baking tin grease gently with a little butter on the bottom and sides place some greaseproof baking paper on the bottom and sides pour in mixture lick the spoon bake for 20-22 minutes so the inside is nice and gooey let it rest for a little while warm is better cold is just dandy consume on its own consume with vanilla ice cream consume with double cream but do consume
  • March 12, 2012 - 5:28am
    Anonymous (not verified)
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    slopey biona soul mountain
    spring is here. homemade pickled vegetable; chinese lettuce, carrot, cucumber. avocado, fresh sardines, sweet corn, spring onion, soy and cushioning of little mayonnaise. mix gently, add some cider vinegar (with the mother); unpasteurised, unfiltered and oak matured. freshly ground black pepper, that lemon essence and himalayan pink salt. japanese rice or failing that, pudding rice, the closest in texture. mix the ingredients cold. add to the fresh hot rice. sour, sweet, like space dust on the tongue. a drip of fine hot pepper sauce, a little encona west indian mash; habanero and scotch bonnet. fire and citrus heat. tongue sparkle and sensation drenched. welcome to march.
  • November 14, 2011 - 9:35am
    Anonymous (not verified)
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    river cottage
    wonderful chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall. the new series about vegetables. inspiring person in every way. if anyone wonders what Fish Fight is about on Bill Kreutzmann's website, it was instigated by this guy. Episode 1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WGEHq4wkDwI Episode 2 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_5tyx86Aq0 Episode 3 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yvt_CvC8ISQ Episode 4 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mqcN46ivNN0 not too late everyone to sign up and support Fish Fight. go here - http://www.fishfight.net/
  • July 31, 2008 - 8:58am
    marye
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    May 26, 2007
    bummer about the plum juice!
    but sounds mighty tasty.
  • July 31, 2008 - 4:41am
    cosmicbadger
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    June 13, 2007
    A disaster averted
    Spicy chickpea soup for supper last night. Cut up some onions, carrots and celery and softened them in olive oil. Stirred in a mixture of lots of cumin and a little coriander powder and a dash of turmeric, chilli flakes and ginger. Salt and lots of black pepper. Added a couple of cans of chick peas and a lot of lemon juice. Then I went to the fridge for a pot of delicious golden chicken stock made the day before and poured it in to the mixture.. .....except .....oh no..... THAT was not the chicken stock ....it was a pot of juice extracted from the golden plums we had picked in the morning! Duh…curried sour plum and chickpea soup anyone? Any hope that this was a new culinary discovery were dashed when I tasted it...not good. Quickly drained off the plum juice and washed the chick peas and veg under the tap. Made up a new spice mixture and started again, this time with the real chicken stock. Slow cooked for 20 minutes, 30 seconds with the hand blender…a dash more lemon juice and pepper. For a salad: painted some some aubergine (eggplant) slices with olive oil and grilled them. Added cherry tomatoes from the garden, thin sliced white onions, chopped garlic and a mass of fresh chopped parsley, coriander, thyme and basil. A final drizzle of olive oil, loads of balck pepper and a pinch of sea salt. Dinner in the garden with some fresh bread and a glass or two of rose wine. Delicious..but I’m gonna have to pick some more plums today.
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Red Whiskey - it's not the only thing for dinner, is it? What's cookin', FoodieHeads?
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get a pound pack of them 16 beans, rinse them well, soak 'em over night to soften them up. rinse them again. about 2 or 3 cups of water, add as much chili powder as you can take, red pepper, black / white pepper, some jalapenos, onions, carrots, any other veggies you like, add some fresh or canned tomatoes, add some spicy salsa, simmer for 2 or 3 hours. mix up some cold water with corn starch, whey, or a bit of flour and add it in to thicken it up at the very last minute... mmmm mmmm good. don't light any matches in the vicinity, fart city. peace.
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it was good, but cooking up a pound of beans, 5 carrots, lots of mushrooms, 3 onions, a big can of tomatos-- we were fucking eating chilli all week. I especially like to melt cheese on top of the chilli. "mmmm, Chilli cheese." (Homer Simpson voice)
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I'm going to be eating chicken all week now. I have a chicken defrosting and getting ready to roast this evening. That always turns into about 4 meals plus chicken salad.
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Arroz Con Gondules is my favorite food in the world. I think I could live off of it. It is the national dish of Puerto Rico. We eat it every year at Chrismas time. Although I make it at least once a month. Like many Puerto Rican dishes, it is a combination of Spanish, African, and Caribbean Native American cooking. My recipe is adapted from my Titi Maria. It's really easy to make. I don't make homemade sazon or sofrito like my Titi Maria or Nana. You can purchase these things from most supermarkets (in the Spanish section) or at your local Latino bodega. I normally use Goya brand. For vegetarians, you don't need to add pork sausage (we Puerto Ricans do love our pork! :) ) Just follow the recipe sans pork. --Gandules beans, cleaned, and soaked in water over night OR one can of Goya gandules beans. --1medium yellow or Vadilia onion, chopped --1small green pepper and 1 small poblano pepper, chopped --2 garlic cloves minced --ground pork sausage (1/4 lb to 1 lb is cool. 1 pound will make the dish a stand alone meal. another variation I like is Chorizo sausage. I chop the sausages up) --1/4 to 1/2 cup tomato sauce --2 tbls Sofrito --1 packet sazon --handful of pimento stuffed green olives, chopped --2 cups water --1 cup rice In a large pot, brown up the sausage with a bit of olive oil. Add onions and pepper and saute for about 5 min. Add garlic, and saute for about 3 min more. Add the rest of the ingredients EXCEPT rice. Stir and bring to a slow boil. Slowly stir in rice, cover and lower heat. cook for 20-30 minutes until rice has absorbed the water. You're ready to eat! Yo Soy Boricua!
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The following is a chili recipe I have been developing for a few years now. I hope to enter it into a chili competition sometime. It is kind of labor intensive and makes a ton (It's good for those fall/winter parties and get-togethers). NOTE: this is a traditional chili recipe, therefore there are no beans and is loaded with beef. MIKE’S BREW CHILI 1 Case of your favorite Ale or Lager 2 ½ lb steak, cut into cubes 2 ½ lb ground beef ½ tbls oregano 4 packets Goya Sazon seasoning 7 tbls chili powder 2 tbls cumin 2 tbls paprika 2 large onions, diced (Vidalia or red) 6 cloves garlic, minced 1 red bell pepper, 1 green bell pepper, diced 1/4 to 3/4 of a 7 oz can chipotle peppers in adobo sauce, diced (this is hot stuff! less is more) 1 jalapeno pepper, minced 1- 4oz. can diced green chilies 15 oz. Can crushed tomatoes 2 tbls Goya sofrito 1 tbls brown sugar 1 tbls balsamic vinigar corn starch salt and pepper to taste Good tunes 1. Drink a beer, put on some tunes, and review directions. 2. In a large pot or Dutch oven, brown all the beef w/ 2 tbls chili powder and two packets of Sazon. Drain only a small portion of fat (flavor). Add two beers, the rest of the chili powder, oregano, cumin, paprika, Sazon, and get to a boil. Simmer for two hours. You'll want another beer at this point. 3. Heat a skillet with olive oil and sweat onions. During last couple of minutes add garlic and saute. Add onions and garlic to the chili along with the chipotles, jalapeno, green chilies, red and green pepper, and tomatoes. Bring to a boil. Turn down heat and simmer 2-3 hours. A few more beers at this point will taste good. Turn up that Scarlet>Fire! 4. Add brown sugar and vinegar. Whisk together equal parts corn starch and liquid from chili in a small bowl (enough to thicken, about 2-3 teaspoons). Add to chili. Boil until thickened. YUMM! Of course a beer or two will go wonderfully with the chili. Yo Soy Boricua!
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Stuff a cornish hen into a duck and stuff that into a turkey and then bake it. Sounds twisted and gross and the kind of thing that a society in decline (ancient Rome) would come up with. Supposedly there is such a dish. I'll go with a good burrito or maybe a veggie pizza instead, though.
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Today I cooked Indian. A nice Tikka Massala, with chicken. Took two nice, cleaned deboned chicken breasts cut them into pieces about 1" square or so. Marinated them for about 5 hours. Prepare a large saucepan full of Basmati rice. About 2 cups worth. Always get the rice going first. Cut up the chicken in pieces about 1" square or so. Fry em up in a saucepan. Add several small onions (about 4 or 5), quartered. Add about 2 - 3 cups of cherry tomatoes. Finally add prepared Tikka Massala sauce (available from any good grocery). I use "Patak" brand. Cook on low heat for about 30 minutes, or until the onions and tomatoes are soft and integrated into the melange. Slather over the rice, and enjoy! I was taught by the best, my mother, who was a superb cook. Started cooking at about age 15. Today I can literally cook anything. Give me a recipe, or I can just wing it. We never go hungry in my house.
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what are you supposed to marinate the chicken in?
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personally I don't like using prepared sauces... then again, I got time on my hands... 1 cup yogurt 1 tablespoon lemon juice 2 teaspoons ground cumin 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 2 teaspoons cayenne pepper 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger 4 teaspoons salt, or to taste 3 boneless skinless chicken breasts, cut into bite-size pieces OR vegetarians use koyadofu as a substitute (koyadofu is the tofu concentrate that you have to soak in water (like a sponge) before you can start to use it. or use regular HARD tofu. don't grill the tofu, and don't grill the koyadofu just stick it in the fry pan with a smigen of grape seed oil to brown it a bit before you add it to the sauce 1 tablespoon butter 1 clove garlic, minced 1 jalapeno pepper, finely chopped 2 teaspoons ground cumin 2 teaspoons paprika 1 teaspoons salt, or to taste 1 (8 ounce) can tomato sauce 1 cup heavy cream 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro In a BIG bowl, pack in the yogurt, lemon juice, 2 teaspoons cumin, cinnamon, cayenne, black pepper, ginger, and 4 teaspoons salt. Stir in chicken, cover, and refrigerate for 1 hour. Lightly oil the grill. (I use grape seed oil) poke the chicken onto skewers, and dump out the marinade. Grill until juices run clear, about 5 minutes on each side. WARNING: vegetarians-- do not attempt to grill your tofu or koyadofu! Melt butter in a large heavy skillet over medium heat. Saute garlic and jalapeno for 1 minute. Season with 2 teaspoons cumin, paprika, and 1 teaspoon salt. Stir in tomato sauce and cream. Simmer on low heat until sauce thickens, about 20 minutes. Add grilled chicken, and simmer for 10 minutes. garnish with fresh cilantro. mmm mmm good. "What's the point of calling shots, this cue ain't straight in line Cue balls made of styrofoam and no-one's got the time"
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Ah, yes. I use a combo of various "stuff". 1 tsp of Prepackaged chicken marinade, about 1/4 cup white vinegar, 3/4 tsp Indian Masala spice 1/2 tsp curry powder, and about 1 - 2 tsp of the Tikka Masala sauce. and about 1/4 cup water. Mix up the muck in a measuring cup, and pour over the cut up chicken. It's really not critical. The key is the vinegar, and the curry powder. Anything that will tenderize the chicken. We've had this Tikka Masala chicken for two nights running and one lunch . De-lish! (But I can see getting tired of it.) One more serving left for tomorrow, and then we're on to breaded chicken cutlets. Probably serve that with my tomato and palm heart salad and some green veggie on the side. Probably asparagus. Tomato and palm heart salad. Two cups (or one box) grape tomatoes. One can medallioned palm hearts 1/4 cup red vinegar 1/4 cup light olive oil 1/5 cup "Balistic" (Balsamic) Vinegar. (These quantities are "to taste". You can add more or less as desired.) 1 - 2 tsp dry parseley or 1/5 cup fresh parseley 3/4 tsp "Italian spices" dry 1/2 tsp ground black pepper Cut grape tomatoes in half. Cut palm hearts in half Add palm heart medallions to the tomatoes add the oil, and vinegars, and the spices and pepper blended in a mixing cup. (I whisk the mixture with a fork) Pour this vinegrette over the tomatoes and palm hearts, mix well, and enjoy.
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Oh, yeah... drain the palm heart medallions. You can add a bit of the juice to the vinegrette... say 1 - 2 Tblsp.
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Oh...yeah.... coriander!!!!!!!!!!!! Or cilantro, if you like. I use a lot of coriander in Indian cooking. How could I forget??? I guess it's so natural, that I forgot. Anyway, I use fresh coriander. 1 bunch. I wash the bunch, dry it off and then chop up the leaves. I add a large "pinch" and I mean a large pinch of coriander with every step in my cooking. Fry up chicken? Add coriander. Add onions? Add coriander. Onions are softened? Add coriander. Add tomatoes? Add coriander. Tomatoes are softened? Coriander! Add sauce? Add coriander. Check 10 minutes later? More coriander. You can never have enough coriander in Indian cooking. Besides... I love the stuff ;-)
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before cooking the chicken! But you figured that out. I normally just cook the stuff. I rarely write out the recipes, unless it's my pot roast. So you'll forgive me, if I forget a step, or an ingredient. I'm remembering the recipe "on the fly" so to speak.
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Anybody have any suggestions for cooking the blackberries that I have growing like hell in my garden? Besides jam and cobbler, that is. Have done that until can't deal anymore, and am looking for other ideas.
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well, you could always freeze 'em and have cobbler at Christmas!
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We have them growing like weeds up here in WA. I pick them,wash them, and feed them to my kids so they have a nice snack and then watch them bounce all over the room...lol.... Someday I might actually make something with them as they're everywhere!
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how bouts a nice wine from them thar berries???? nothing left to do but smile, smile, smile
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Marinate a good sized pork loin in italian dressing and 2 cloves of minced garlic and a half cup of apple juice for 24 to 48 hours. Hook up the rotisseree unit on the grill. Preheat grill on low for a couple minutes. Put roast on and close lid for 20 minutes. Open lid and brush on marinade. Close lid half way and let cook on med heat. Brush on marinade every 20 minutes till roast is done to your liking. Yummy!!!!!
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vegans, please note: there is no butter used in this recipe. ( -: 1 cup of berries 5 big spoons of cinamon 500 grams of bread flour 3 big spoons (table spoon) of brown sugar 2 small spoons (tea spoon) of salt 280 cc of lukewarm water 2 small spoons of dry yeast mix it up, mash it up, knead it for 20 - 30 minutes... let it rise for about 1 hour (in a warm place) bake at 185 degrees celcius for 32 minutes. mmmm mmmm good.
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CC Joe,Knead for 20-30 minutes. Should be called blackberry work-out crisp bread! And bake for 32 minutes? LOL! 30 too short, 35 too much? As for blackberry wine, is a grand idea, but have no clue how to make wine. Perhaps I should ask somebody here how to make schnapps. The Germans are fond of making that out of fruit. And about freezing them, is the most practical idea of all Marye, with one small hitch. Have a teeny tiny freezer, and right now it's full of white asparagus from Farmer Willi (is a specialty of this region, prize winning white asparagus) but perhaps I SHOULD eat asparagus all week to make room for some blackberries. Thanx for the tips so far!:-)
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as to give the temperature in degrees celcius. Will give me more time to put into all that kneading, by not having to make an attempt at calculating between degrees farenheit and celcius.Still will have to wing it that can find the EXACT spot between 180 and 190 on my oven dial, as this dial only goes in increments of 10 degrees, stupid thing. And I DO sincerely want to give my best attempt at "just exactly perfect French Bread", thus will follow your recipe exactly down to the 32 minutes.
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...Now I have no excuse not to use all those damn berries in yard...Im printing recp. out and will give it a try as time permits Eric
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yeah, I remembered you were in Germany, (ironic, right? isn't that guy Farenheit a German??!) so the flour is in grams (well, those I do know how to convert in my head) and the temp. in celcius. 180 works fine, but for those in America with Farenheit you can use this simple system to convert the temp: Tf = (9/5)*Tc+32; Tc = temperature in degrees Celsius, Tf = temperature in degrees Fahrenheit For example, suppose you have a Fahrenheit temperature of 98.6 degrees and you wanted to convert it into degrees on the Celsius scale. Using the above formula, you would first subtract 32 from the Fahrenheit temperature and get 66.6 as a result. Then you multiply 66.6 by five-ninths and get the converted value of 37 degrees Celsius. Assume that you have a Celsius scale temperature of 100 degrees and you wish to convert it into degrees on the Fahrenheit scale. Using the stated formula, you first multiply the Celsius scale temperature reading by nine-fifths and get a result of 180. Then add 32 to 180 and get the final converted result of 212 degrees on the Fahrenheit scale. To convert the grams removed to pounds you take the grams, multiply by .002205 to get pounds. For Ex: 1000 grams = 2.205 lbs 950 grams = 2.094 lbs 500 grams = 1.1025 lbs OK, cracking wise again, but the conversions and the math needed are true. if only I could learn how to spell celcius... I also use apples, bannanas, raisins, etc. etc. in a separate recipe, I even cut up onions into small bits and add it into the bread, too. (or pizza dough) by the way, with berries or other fruit, depending on how ripe they are, you may need to add a bit more flour as you are kneeding it. you do not want the dough to be sticky, and you do not want it to be 'dusty' there is a happy median; which you will find. peace.
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why not put this one in here, too 563 grams of bread flour 2.47 small spoons of dry yeast 1.97 small spoons of salt 2.13 big spoons of sugar (white or brown) 292 cc of luke warm water (never too hot or you will kill the yeast!) 2.37 table spoons of olive oil (extra virgin) what the fuck is up with that 'Extra Virgin' thing... she won't even let you feel her up?? anyway, kneed it up, mix it up, mash it up for 27 minutes. let it rise for 43 minutes in a warm place. roll it out into a round shape (or square if you want Sicilian pizza) thick or thin, up to you... Napolitano is paper thin crust... roll it out, put it into a teflon cooking pan, or use cooking wax paper. put the paper betewwn the pan and the dough. ( -; put on the gravy (tomato sauce) let it rise again for 26 minutes. bake at 180 degrees celcious or 212 degrees farenheit for 16 minutes. take it out, add the mozzerella cheese and other toppings (or a (substitute) soy cheese if you are a vegan) turn the oven up to 200 degrees celcious if you want it crispy, or 190 if you want it softer, bake for another 14 minutes. fresh, homemade pizza. OR: call Dominoes-- order what you like smoke a big fattie in 8 minutes wait 22 minutes. ( -; peace.
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what's that in cups and teaspoons?
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cups schmups... ( -; small spoons are tea spoons. big spoons are table spoons. I stopped using cups long ago, it is much better to weigh it out and measure carefully. get a kitchen scale. OK, you do not need a triple beam balance rig... but a simple kitchen scale is fine. one you can re-calibrate after you put the bowl on top. the crucially climacteric cup crisis, (if you weren't just busting my chops with the question) if you pour it quickly, or dig deeply and rashly into your sack of flour; the flour gets compressed and significantly increases the amount of weight. it totally fucks up the bread. I've been doing this for a long time. and continue to strive to get it 'just exactly perfect' ( -; and, I've been waiting a very long time to have the opportunity to say "cups scmups" ( -: peace.
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I will heed your advice, but I've gone over half a century without using kitchen scales and it's a pretty alien concept. On the other hand, bread really is pretty unforgiving, so I take this to heart. I tend to stick to things like chocolate chip cookies, which I've made so many times I don't really have to think about it much. Though i will say the Kitchen Aid hand mixer changed my life.
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if you are using a standard cookie recipe with baking soda or a cake mix recipe with baking powder, you can eye-ball it without fear. anything with yeast is a totally different story... oh, and by the way, it is best to store your yeast in the freezer in an airtight container. weigh schmei? or use a scale? up to you to get The Best of Bread, I suggest the latter... peace.
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* Extra-virgin olive oil (sometimes called EVOO) comes from the first pressing of the olives, contains no more than 0.8% acidity, and is judged to have a superior taste. There can be no refined oil in extra-virgin olive oil. * Virgin olive oil has an acidity less than 2%, and judged to have a good taste. There can be no refined oil in virgin olive oil. * Olive oil is a blend of virgin oil and refined oil, containing no more than 1.5% acidity. It commonly lacks a strong flavor. * Olive-pomace oil is a blend of refined pomace olive oil and possibly some virgin oil. It is fit for consumption, but it may not be called olive oil. Olive-pomace oil is rarely found in a grocery store; it is often used for certain kinds of cooking in restaurants. * Lampante oil is olive oil not used for consumption; lampante comes from olive oil's ancient use as fuel in oil-burning lamps. Lampante oil is mostly used in the industrial market. Pasted from Wikipedia. So basically you are correct CC, with your guess about "extra virgin" meaning extra chaste oil.
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I know all about extra virgin - I went to a Catholic school... (I actually knew that stuff about the oil, too - just being a wise ass with the joke -- the smack you just heard was Sister Rose Marie hitting me with a ruler) but seriously folks: unless I'm cooking Italian food or making pizza dough, etc. I never use olive oil or vegetable oil or corn oil... we use grape seed oil for stir frying or whatever -- it is supposed to be healthy. look here for details: http://www.grape-seed-oil.com/articles/grapeseed-oil-healthy-news-lets-… peace.
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I gotta try that game-hen>duck>turkey dish.... MMMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.......
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The idea kind of grosses me out, but then I don't eat duck. My sister's family, on the other hand, are big fans and had a turducken feast over the holidays last year.
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One of the problems with this is the use of different measurements I live in Spain so all the measurements are metric, but i am English so i also use Imperial,( pounds ounces etc) I have never used cups etc though I will dig out my Recipe for Scarlet >Fire Sambal Bob W - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Spanish Jam
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How is an Imperial pound related to an American pound? Are they the same? But a pound in the metric system is relatively easy. One U.S. pound is basically the same as one German "Pfund" which is pretty exactly half a kilo (500 grams) Please do post your recipe for Scarlet Fire Sambal!
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Cut avo in half length-wise. Take out stone. Put salad dressing or equivalent into subsequent hole. Eat with spoon. Don't thank me, thank the avo god of Uxbridge!
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My son comes home the other night with a big zip loc bag containing what appeared to be steak. It turned out his work partner went fishing, that day, and caught a 65 lb. tuna! Too much to eat in a reasonable time for one person so we received a huge filet as a gift. Last night, I made a marinade of balsamic glaze, white wine (can't remember the name/brand 'cause I don't drink alcohol but it was delicately dry, from the aroma - great for cooking with fish), ground ginger, Asian sesame oil (I know they say don't use for cooking but I love it in a marinade sauce whose purpose is almost "blackening" such was this) brushed on the filets, which I cut about 3/4" thick, washed and patted dry before preparing. Then I dusted the glazed filets with a dry blackening rub for fish and poultry (the one with the guy that looks like Dom Deluise on the label), course cracked black pepper, fine white pepper, Kosher salt and sesame seeds. I placed a half dozen Roma tomatoes, two green peppers and a white onion (cut in half and sliced x 4, without cutting all the way through the root end - keeping it in two halves, in other words, leaving the root end still attached) on a hot grill, after bushing with marinade sauce and dusting with Kosher salt and toasted sesame seeds, while I prepared a cup of Basmati rice on the stove. When the vegetables were sweated and soft, the tomatoes almost bursting, I placed them into a foil wrap pre-treated with non stick spray and a few table spoons of the marinade sauce and loosely sealed, reducing the flame on one side of the grill to low. On the other side of the grill, I turned to high heat to sear the tuna steaks, waiting so they would come off the grill last, to the plated sides. After a few mouth watering moments waiting for the grill to be sizzling hot, the tuna steaks hit the searing grill and the aroma was almost too much to bear. Luckily there was more work to be done and before the grill top was replaced, the timer got set to 3.5 mins. and the vegetables got plucked off and dumped onto a large plate where the onion's root end, the green peppers stems and the tomatoes skins were removed (I left some of the smaller tomatoes intact for a nice presentation for the plated food). I sliced the green peppers length wise and roughly "smashed" some of the tomatoes and added both to the prepared rice, placing the onion wedges on top with several whole roasted tomatoes next to the rice, on the side. After the timer rang, I flipped the tuna steaks for 2.5 mins. and afterwards placed them on the plate next to the whole roasted tomatoes (you could also put them on top of the rice and veggies but my wife prefers on the side, separate). I served my wife a glass of the wine with her meal that was used in the marinade sauce, which she said added to the experience (must have, 'cause the "2nd dessert" was very good....if you catch my drift ;) We had homemade blueberry cobbler for "1st dessert" (I'll have to get my wife to write that recipe) that was as good as the main meal. I'm inviting my mom over tonight for a repeat performance since we didn't hardly put a dent in the huge filet. Bon Appetit!
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11 years 5 months
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6 Large Tomatos3 Medium Onions 1 piece Ginger (approx 2cm 1 inch square) Chillies depends on strength (but needs to be quite hot to counter sugar) 1 tsp Mustard Seeds 1 tsp crushed coriander seeds 1 tsp Crushed Black Pepper 1 tsp Coleman's English Mustard Powder 2 tsp Curry Powder 1 tsp Cumin seeds Large dash Worcestershire Sauce 10 Cloves of Garlic 1 tsp Tarragon 1 tsp Margaram Brown Sugar ( enough to get a sweet/Chili Balance) Wine Vinegar Put Tomatos, Onions, Garlic, Chillies and Ginger in a blender and blend Heat pan and put in Spices toast slightly and add Tomato mixture. Then add the other ingredients and cook slowly until in reaches a jam like consistency. During cooking test for balance between sugar and Chillies , it needs to be hot and sweet. Put Hot into sterilized jars enjoy bob W - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Spanish Jam
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160ml White Wine Vinegar180 ml Dark Brown Sugar 750g Firm Mangoes ( peeled and cubed) 1 chopped onion 1 chopped tart apple 1/2 lime peeled very thinly sliced and chopped 2 tb minced fresh ginger 3/4 tsp ground cinnamon 1/4 tsp Allspice 1/4 tsp Cloves 1/4 tsp dried red pepper flakes 1/2 tsp salt 4 cloves of garlic minced 80ml raisins Place the vinegar and sugar in a pan and bring to the boil Add the remaining ingredients , bring to boil then take off the heat and let sit for half an hour ( a nice Dark Star should time this nicely) Gently simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until thickened. Approx 45 mins Ladle into sterilized jars Enjoy Bob W - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Spanish Jam
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11 years 4 months
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You were making my mouth water with your description of your fresh tuna there. Ever think about writing narrative cook books? You wrote the procedure sooo well! And I will DEFINATELY give your way a try next time I have fresh tuna steaks. Had usually just marinated them in wasabi and soy sauce, which is yummy, but what you did sounds more interesting!
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11 years 5 months
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....I aim to please ;-)! I also love the wasabi and soy sauce btw, but I'm really hooked on the balsamic glaze at the moment and the various concoctions I've come up with seem to have peaked with the one I posted. Thanks again for the compliment! Also, that Sunshine Daydream, Scarlet Fire Sambal sounds amazing! I'm going to try that one myself. The Dude Abides!
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thanks grtud, I hope you enjoy it. You will probably have to tinker with spices a bit to fine tune to your taste buds and ingredients. I live in Spain so we are bit away from the centre of Europe, but weathers great and vegs are good Bob - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Spanish Jam
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11 years 4 months
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Am hot and bothered to try that one too, but am somewhat stuck on where I'm gonna come up with Worchestershire Sauce and the Mustard powder. How vital are those ingredients, S.D.? Can I crush mustard seeds, or use a spoon of normal mustard instead? If so, then hot or normal mustard?
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Worcestershire sauce is reasonably easy to get here at least most supermarkets sell it, i am sure in the foreign section of supermarket there you will find it. Mustard powder is different i have had to buy that in England when i go over. English Mustard is different to others it is hot but not chilli hot, it catches your at the back of your nose. You can try normal mustard there is vinegar in the recipe anyway Bob - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Spanish Jam
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Would they have it in Ireland, by any chance? If so, can ask my friend there to send me some. Otherwise is mustard here that "catches you at the back of your nose", so will try that. Cut back just slightly on vinegar then, or would you recommend leave as is?Don't remember seeing Worschestershire, but can admit have never looked. Will look on next shopping expedition. Otherwise I can ask Justin to send me that too, while he's at it with the mustard powder.
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Since CCJoe was so thoughtful to post a recipe for pizza dough, can now post my heavy-duty pizza sauce recipe, with the top secret ingredient. Try it, but SHHHH! Guests LOVE this sauce, but can never figure out why it tastes like it does, and I usually don't tell. I follow no recipe, and spice it to taste, so will wing it with the amounts.Is a very thick, rich, and hearty sauce. All herbs and spices can be adjusted as you wish.One tablespoon olive oil a shitload of garlic cloves, minced (I use 4 or 5) half a teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes tablespoon (plus or minus) FRESH minced oregano leaves same of basil make a paste of all of this and let it sit for a while 2 tubes tomato paste (200 grams each) ounces??? no idea, where is CCJoe with his conversions when I need him? 1 box tomato sauce (500 grams) again ounces no idea 1 teaspoon suger mix the tomato things and sugar together well,add the olive oil mixture and again mix well. salt and ground black pepper to taste shot of red wine, preferably dry Italian and the secret-half a teaspoon of ground anise. Compliments the tomatos in a suprising way, and cuts the bite just enough to be interesting. Let the whole mixture sit covered in a warm place for at least 2 hours, to let flavors mix before spreading on pizza dough. Also works well to freeze half for another time.