• 203 replies
    izzie
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    May 26, 2007
    Red Whiskey - it's not the only thing for dinner, is it? What's cookin', FoodieHeads?

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  • October 12, 2015 - 11:39pm
    Randall Lard
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    July 30, 2012
    Means Nothing To No Way
    Husband: "How long does it take to boil an egg?"Wife: "3 minutes." Husband: "What, on both sides?"
  • October 11, 2015 - 7:46pm
    rgergelis
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    @wilfredtjones
    ...the preceding was brought to you by Lipitor and cardiovascular surgeons everywhere... I'm sure it tastes great :-)
  • October 11, 2015 - 7:22pm
    wilfredtjones
    Joined:
    June 4, 2007
    an unsolicited tip
    Straight from the kitchen of wilfredtjones: Find yourself some bacon fat, and some leftover pizza. Heat up a pan (be it inside or on the grill) and about 2 big T's of the fat, once the pan and fat are hot carefully slap the pizza onto the pan. Sauté enough to bring the crust to a golden color, taking care not to burn the crust. Employ a cover to get the cheese and toppings melted to your liking. You will never believe how far a little bacon fat will go to revive that lifeless leftover pizza. Yow to wow in 5 minutes flat! Enjoy.
  • March 25, 2015 - 6:37am
    motoman615
    Joined:
    February 9, 2015
    great morning energy juice
    This is for a large pitcher of juice so adjust accordingly. All organic 10 med carrots 4 stalks celery 6 granny smith apples 1 red beet peeled with greens and stalks 1 lemon 4 stalks kale Enjoy!
  • January 29, 2015 - 7:22pm
    wilfredtjones
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    June 4, 2007
    on the menu tonight
    One frozen dinner: Amy's Vegetable Korma & 2 beers (Deschutes Obsidian Stout and Sierra Nevada Torpedo).
  • July 9, 2012 - 8:36am
    Anonymous (not verified)
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    March 29, 2017
    cake or death
    one moist chocolate pudding. you will need 1 bar of dark (85%) organic chocolate 60g organic butter 1 tbsp organic honey 50g organic cocoa 20g self raising flour 3 free range organic eggs 120g organic light muscovado sugar 70ml organic double cream handful of pecan nuts turn on the oven melt dark chocolate bar with the butter add the tbsp of honey add the coca powder with the flour and sift together to ensure any pesky lumps are smoothed take the eggs and the sugar and whisk until the consistency of double cream add the melted chocolate mixture and fold in gently add the 70ml of double cream and fold in gently add the flour/cocoa powder combo and fold in gently add your nuts take a 7" wide by 2 and 3/4" circular baking tin grease gently with a little butter on the bottom and sides place some greaseproof baking paper on the bottom and sides pour in mixture lick the spoon bake for 20-22 minutes so the inside is nice and gooey let it rest for a little while warm is better cold is just dandy consume on its own consume with vanilla ice cream consume with double cream but do consume
  • March 12, 2012 - 5:28am
    Anonymous (not verified)
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    March 29, 2017
    slopey biona soul mountain
    spring is here. homemade pickled vegetable; chinese lettuce, carrot, cucumber. avocado, fresh sardines, sweet corn, spring onion, soy and cushioning of little mayonnaise. mix gently, add some cider vinegar (with the mother); unpasteurised, unfiltered and oak matured. freshly ground black pepper, that lemon essence and himalayan pink salt. japanese rice or failing that, pudding rice, the closest in texture. mix the ingredients cold. add to the fresh hot rice. sour, sweet, like space dust on the tongue. a drip of fine hot pepper sauce, a little encona west indian mash; habanero and scotch bonnet. fire and citrus heat. tongue sparkle and sensation drenched. welcome to march.
  • November 14, 2011 - 9:35am
    Anonymous (not verified)
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    river cottage
    wonderful chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall. the new series about vegetables. inspiring person in every way. if anyone wonders what Fish Fight is about on Bill Kreutzmann's website, it was instigated by this guy. Episode 1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WGEHq4wkDwI Episode 2 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_5tyx86Aq0 Episode 3 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yvt_CvC8ISQ Episode 4 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mqcN46ivNN0 not too late everyone to sign up and support Fish Fight. go here - http://www.fishfight.net/
  • July 31, 2008 - 8:58am
    marye
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    May 26, 2007
    bummer about the plum juice!
    but sounds mighty tasty.
  • July 31, 2008 - 4:41am
    cosmicbadger
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    June 13, 2007
    A disaster averted
    Spicy chickpea soup for supper last night. Cut up some onions, carrots and celery and softened them in olive oil. Stirred in a mixture of lots of cumin and a little coriander powder and a dash of turmeric, chilli flakes and ginger. Salt and lots of black pepper. Added a couple of cans of chick peas and a lot of lemon juice. Then I went to the fridge for a pot of delicious golden chicken stock made the day before and poured it in to the mixture.. .....except .....oh no..... THAT was not the chicken stock ....it was a pot of juice extracted from the golden plums we had picked in the morning! Duh…curried sour plum and chickpea soup anyone? Any hope that this was a new culinary discovery were dashed when I tasted it...not good. Quickly drained off the plum juice and washed the chick peas and veg under the tap. Made up a new spice mixture and started again, this time with the real chicken stock. Slow cooked for 20 minutes, 30 seconds with the hand blender…a dash more lemon juice and pepper. For a salad: painted some some aubergine (eggplant) slices with olive oil and grilled them. Added cherry tomatoes from the garden, thin sliced white onions, chopped garlic and a mass of fresh chopped parsley, coriander, thyme and basil. A final drizzle of olive oil, loads of balck pepper and a pinch of sea salt. Dinner in the garden with some fresh bread and a glass or two of rose wine. Delicious..but I’m gonna have to pick some more plums today.
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Red Whiskey - it's not the only thing for dinner, is it? What's cookin', FoodieHeads?
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without a doubt, Thai food is my all time fave among Asian cuisines, and (brag brag) my old lady just graduated (certificate in hand) from her Intensive Thai Cooking Course in what is the Culinary Institute of Bangkok. She would cook up all sorts of delicious stuff from scratch-- none of that "add green curry paste" shit, she was pounding those chillis until they begged for mercy from her mortar and pestle (sic) and then bring it back to our crib for dinner. mmm mmm good. when SHE gets her act together (be prepared to wait a while -- in other words) and when we get somewhere with some tech equipment, we'll try to scan the recipes and post them up... but be prepared to go on a scavenger hunt for the ingredients -- half of that stuff I've never even heard of. We packed a bag full of LEGAL Thai herbs, roots, seeds, spices, etc. to take home. think we'll have trouble at Customs back in the world??!!
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One good thing about the Bay Area is that it's probably easier to get a lot of those ingredients here than in many other places in the U.S. But probably not all of them. Good luck with customs and good luck with future agricultural efforts!
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yeah, it is hard to find the proper ingredients, outside of big American cities that have large Asian or in particular, Thai / Lao / Cambodian populations. We were "cheaters" in cooking Thai food for many years, using the pastes or mixes that you can buy in any Thai supermarket or many Asian markets in the west. But you are only cheating yourself, as my third grade teacher used to say as she chided me for using a cheat sheet on spelling tests. The difference in taste is astounding. It is a damn shame that many Thai cookbooks published in the west all too often steer people to obtainable ingredients rather than the 'proper' ingredients; like substituting ketchup (loud SHHHEEEESH!!) instead of what it should be... Many of the Thai restaurants in the US are in fact run by Cambodians, since the refugee populations could get to America while it remains really hard for Thais to get Visas to visit America - let alone, try to emmigrate there. Funny thing is, Cambodian food is quite different, but certainly not as popular in the US as Thai food. oh, to THE MAN with the pistol on his belt and absolutely NO CIVIL LIBERTIES for anyone in that 'no man's land' of customs and immigration. Legally (?) officially, they can do just about anything they want to, searching, x-rays, keeping you locked up for hours if not days on end as they 'investigate' While I respect folks who have a serious job to do, it is a bad place to be especially after being trapped in a tin can of a plane for 20 hours or more. I'm on a first name basis (not by choice) with a lot of people in Customs since we get the secondary soft search almost everytime we travel back and forth. Luckily, we've never had to endure the 'hard' search into body cavities or x-rays; but our profile fits, so they hassle us. Only Hawaii seriously restricts importing veggies / plants / fruit etc. so we have to be careful about the routing and such. It is kind of funny, because most of the dogs you see in Honolulu / Hilo / Kona are trained to smell fruit. One friend had a gift of some dried fruit or something, the cute little pooch trotted right over to her and sat down -- she, being a dog lover, knelt down to let him smell her hand and pet him, and then she was taken behind the green door. http://www.ufmeducation.com/new/eng/courses_detail.php?group_id=8 http://www.ufmeducation.com/new/thai/index.php http://www.ufmeducation.com/new/eng/index.php this was the place, and my old lady was really happy with the whole deal. several hundred dollars in cost, only about 7 or 8 students in her class which was taught in Thai language and English (my old lady's Thai ain't that good) all of her classmates were Thai people who hope to work in a fancy hotel in Thailand or open their own restaurant at home or abroad. As Thais are generally an easy going, fun bunch of folks; she really, really had a grate time-- but people kept asking her "what are those little bears and turtles on your apron??" next trip she wants to do the Thai dessert course, and who am I not to say 'absolutely! fucking do it!!' ?? peace.
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not my origianl writing, but interesting and who knows if it is true?? A professor at CCNY for a physiological psych class told his class about bananas. He said the expression "going bananas" is from the effects of bananas on the brain. Read on: Bananas contain three natural sugars - sucrose, fructose and glucose combined with fiber. A banana gives an instant, sustained and substantial boost of energy. Research has proven that just two bananas provide enough energy for a strenuous 90-minute workout. No wonder the banana is the number one fruit with the world's leading athletes. But energy isn't the only way a banana can help us keep fit. It can also help overcome or prevent a substantial number of illnesses and conditions, making it a must to add to our daily diet. Depression: According to a recent survey undertaken by MIND amongst people suffering from depression, many felt much better after eating a banana. This is because bananas contain tryptophan, a type of protein that the body converts into serotonin, known to make you relax, improve your mood and generally make you feel happier. PMS: Forget the pills - eat a banana. The vitamin B6 it contains regulates blood glucose levels, which can affect your mood. Anemia: High in iron, bananas can stimulate the production of hemoglobin in the blood and so helps in cases of anemia. Blood Pressure: This unique tropical fruit is extremely high in potassium yet low in salt, making it perfect to beat blood pressure. So much so, the US Food and Drug Administration has just allowed the banana industry to make official claims for the fruit's ability to reduce the risk of blood pressure and stroke. Brain Power: 200 students at a Twickenham (Middlesex) school were helped through their exams this year by eating bananas at breakfast, break, and lunch in a bid to boost their brain power. Research has shown that the potassium-packed fruit can assist learning by making pupils more alert. Constipation: High in fiber, including bananas in the diet can help restore normal bowel action, helping to overcome the problem without resorting to laxatives. Hangovers: One of the quickest ways of curing a hangover is to make a banana milkshake, sweetened with honey. The banana calms the stomach and, with the help of the honey, builds up depleted blood sugar levels, while the milk soothes and re-hydrates your system. Heartburn: Bananas have a natural antacid effect in the body, so if you suffer from heartburn, try e ating a banana for soothing relief. Morning Sickness: Snacking on bananas between meals helps to keep blood sugar levels up and avoid morning sickness. Mosquito bites: Before reaching for the insect bite cream, try rubbing the affected area with the inside of a banana skin. Many people find it amazingly successful at reducing swelling and irritation. Nerves: Bananas are high in B vitamins that help calm the nervous system. Overweight and at work? Studies at the Institute of Psychology in Austria found pressure at wor k leads to gorging on comfort food like chocolate and crisps. Looking at 5,000 hospital patients, researchers found the most obese were more likely to be in high-pressure jobs. The report concluded that, to avoid panic-induced food cravings, we need to control our blood sugar le vels by snacking on high carbohydrate foods every two hours to keep levels steady. Ulcers: The banana is used as the dietary food against intestinal disorders because of its soft texture and smoothness. It is the only raw fruit that can be eaten without distress in over-chronicler cases. It also neutralizes over-acidity and reduces irritation by coating the lining of the stomach. Temperature control: Many other cultures see bananas as a "cooling" fruit that can lower both the physical and emotional temperature of expectant mothers. In Thailand , for example, pregnant women eat bananas to ensure their baby is born with a cool temperature. Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD): Bananas can help SAD sufferers because they contain the natural mood enhancer tryptophan. Smoking &Tobacco Use: Bananas can also help people trying to give up smoking. The B6, B12 they contain, as well as the potassium and magnesium found in them, help the body recover from the effects of nicotine withdrawal. < BR> Stress: Potassium is a vital mineral, which helps normalize the heartbeat, sends oxygen to the brain and regulates your body's water balance. When we are stressed, our metabolic rate rises, thereby reducing our potassium levels. These can be rebalanced with the help of a high-potassium banana snack. Strokes: According to research in The New En gland Journal of Medicine, eating bananas as part of a regular diet can cut the risk of death by strokes by as much as 40%! Warts: Those keen on natural alternatives swear that if you want to kill off a wart, take a piece of banana skin and place it on the wart, with the yellow side out. Carefully hold the skin in place with a plaster or surgical tape! So, a banana really is a natural remedy for many ills. When you compare it to an apple, it has four times the protein, twice the carbohydrate, three times the phosphorus, five times the vitamin A and iron, and twice the other vitamins and minerals. It is also rich in potassium and is one of the best value foods around So maybe its time to change that well-known phrase so that we say, "A banana a day keeps the doctor away!" PS: Bananas must be the reason monkeys are so happy all the time! I will add one here; want a quick shine on our shoes?? Take the INSIDE of the banana skin, and rub directly on the shoe...polish with dry cloth. Amazing fruit ! "What's the point of calling shots, this cue ain't straight in line Cue balls made of styrofoam and no-one's got the time"
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Marye just requested this so here it is. SOUPE AU PISTOU (French Pesto Soup) Learned to make this when I was 14, helping out in a restaurant in Provence. Never written it down so not sure about quantities and don’t understand US cups, but this should work STEP 1. MAKE PISTOU (can do while making soup) Big double handful of fresh basil (2 cups?).2, 3, 4 or more garlic cloves as you wish. 100g of tomato paste plus a squirt of tomato ketchup. Black pepper. Put it all in a blender and slowly add olive oil till it becomes a paste. You can buy jars of pesto but French Pistou does not normally have parmesan or pine nuts and this soup for me is better without. Some delis sell jars of just the basil, garlic, olive oil paste. STEP 2 MAKE SOUP 2 x medium leeks 2 x fresh sweet carrots, 2 x stems of fresh celery, 1 x Courgette, 1 x Medium waxy potato all diced all into ¼ - ½ inch pieces. Small handful of fine green beans (½ inch pieces). Sweat veggies in a big heavy pan on a low heat with a good big splash of olive oil and the lid on for 10 minutes or so, stirring now and then. Then add enough chicken stock (home made is best) or good veggie stock to cover everything plus an inch or so (around 2 pints maybe). Add 2 bayleaves, sprig of thyme lots of black pepper. Gently boil with lid off for 10-15 minutes or so till veggies just cooked but not mushy. Do not overcook. Add one 20oz drained can of white haricot beans (or well cooked ones prepared from dry). Top up with more stock or water if necessary, enough for it to be soup, but still quite packed with veggies. Add a bunch of chopped oregano if you want (I do) . Bring back to the boil just till the white beans are heated through (a few minutes only). Do not overstir or mush up the beans and veggies. Check salt (stock can be quite salty enough already). SERVING Remove the soup from the heat. You can then stir the pistou into the pot and serve immediately, or it can be fun to put the bowl of pistou in the middle of table, serve the soup good and hot and everyone can stir in a big spoon of pistou into their bowls. I serve with garlic croutons (cubes of stale bread dry fried with chopped garlic).
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"Where was pesto 10 years ago??" George Costanza
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just had to look that one up What's Seinfeld?
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Roast Cornish Hen with Sautéed Blueberries and Garlic Here's a stunning dish using fresh Oregon Jurassic Blueberries; and as always pre-heat your oven to 420 and turn up the live Grateful Dead Music. Peace on Earth, Love Each Other and Eat Massive JurassicBlueberries INGREDIENTS: • 2 Cornish game hens or squabs, halved (about 3 pounds) • 2 tablespoons Balsamic vinegar • 1 teaspoon Salt • 1/4 teaspoon Ground black pepper • 16 Garlic cloves, peeled • 2 tablespoons Unsalted butter, divided • 2 tablespoons Honey • 6 Thyme sprigs • 1/3 cup Minced shallots • 2 cups Fresh blueberries • 1 tablespoon Red wine vinegar PREPARATION: lower Preheated oven to 375ºF. Rub hens with balsamic vinegar; season with salt and pepper. Place on a rack in a roasting pan; roast until thigh juices run clear, about 35 minutes. To prepare garlic: Blanch cloves in boiling water. In a skillet, combine 1 tablespoon of the butter, the honey, thyme, garlic and 1/2 cup water. Simmer until liquid is reduced to a syrup and garlic turns golden brown, stirring often, about 20 minutes; remove thyme sprigs. To prepare sautéed blueberries: In a skillet, over medium heat, melt the remaining 1 tablespoon butter. Add shallots; cook and stir until tender, about 3 minutes. Add blueberries; cook until they soften, about 4 minutes. Stir in red wine vinegar; simmer until mixture has a saucy consistency, about 2 minutes. To serve: Arrange each hen half on wilted escarole, if desired. Spoon sautéed blueberries and sweet garlic cloves around hens. YIELD: 8 portions (about 2 cups sauce)
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could anyone please explain why balching the garlic is a good idea? or more to the point, what does it do to help / change the flavor? and/or how does it change / help the flavor? thankx.
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I guess it's one of those encroaching old age things, but lately it's become very evident that garlic gives me blazing, sledge-hammer migraines. (Joining a short list of other delicacies.) Hence i can only look at this recipe and weep. I might try making it without garlic, as i think the result would still be pretty darn tasty. Maybe up the proportion of shallots. But thanks, Jurassic, it's a treat just to read that recipe.
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I admit it's a stretch to mention frozen prepared food in the context of this topic. However, the sad fact is that many of us, however competent and/or inventive at a full range of other dishes, are really rotten pastry chefs. Hence I mention a couple things I have recently found to be true godsends. Number One: Vermont Mystic Pie Company's frozen pie shells. Flour (King Arthur), butter (Cabot organic), salt (kosher) and water. That's it. Lovely as a pie shell of course, but also good to cut up in triangles and roll up with assorted fruit. Number Two: new discovery as of last week: Trader Joe's frozen chocolate croissants. Leave 'em out overnight to thaw and rise, brush beaten egg over their tops, and bake. Very delish, and devoid of really noxious ingredients. When it comes to pastry, let the pros do their thing, I say... These are both very acceptable results.
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"Baked" French Toast with Jurassic Blueberries and Sweet Hawaiian Indica Sauce 1 Big loaf French or Italian Bread 4 eggs 1/2 cup milk 1/4 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/2 cup sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 2 tablespoons cornstarch 5 cups Jurassic Blueberries (approx 1 1/2 pounds fresh Jurassic Blueberries) 3.5 grams of hawaiian indica nugs ground fine melted into 3 tablespoons sweet cream (unsalted) butter , powdered sugar. As always preheat your oven to 420 degrees, lubricate a 9x13-inch baking pan. Slice the bread into 12 to 14 slices about 1/4 inch thick; place on an ungreased cookie sheet. Whisk eggs, milk, baking powder, and vanilla extract together; slowly pour mixture over the bread, turning to coat the bread completely. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1 to 2 hours or overnight. Combine giant blueberries, cinnamon, sugar, and cornstarch and then place into prepared baking pan. Place bread (wettest side up) on the berry mixture. Wedge slices in tightly, cutting some pieces to fit, if necessary. Brush tops of bread with melted butter. Bake 20 to 25 minutes or until the toast is golden and the berries are bubbling around the sides. Remove from the oven and sprinkle with powdered sugar and indica butter. Let sit for 5 minutes before serving. EAT GIANT JURASSIC BLUEBERRIES, Listen to the Grateful Dead, be happy! Makes 4 to 6 servings.
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I lived near Jurassic's house. If only for the blueberries, as I think the ones in the grocery stores here would be but a pale shadow of Jurassic Blueberries. That sounds just delicious. On so many levels...
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hope i don't offend any vegan/veggie's out there. but being that i have a killer cold, i made a big ole' honkin' pot of my famous chicken soup yesterday. plennnntttyy of garlic in here baby, and it seems to ease the symptoms enough to get through the day it's like a hug, but from the inside!!!! nothing left to do but smile, smile, smile
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you couldn't live here without liking garlic Just making Vegetable soup for lunch nothing difficult just stock seasoning and finely chopped veges of choice, i also add Herbs, a couple of bay leaves , parsley and perhaps thyme and rosemary and of course Garlic Bob - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Spanish Jam

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Over the last couple years, I've really started to to enjoy cooking. As with all things I tend to go waaaaaayyyyyyyy overboard. Witness: 3 eggs canned whipped cream (you don't really need the N2O, so do with it what you'd like...Nobody's judging you) cinnamon sugar honey 1 pound cake, sliced into a dozen pieces. I don't use the 'heels'....I suppose you can, though. Prepare just like french toast. combine the eggs, wc, cinnamon sugar, and honey in a bowl and whisk it until cooperative. Float pound cake in batter and fry until it starts to show light brown patches on both sides. I usually serve it with berries, but most any fruit or syrup will work. Enjoy! ~I was concealed Now I am stirring And I will lay my love around you...~
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Bob, believe me there are similar issues in the Bay Area. After all, Gilroy is the Garlic Capital of the World. I LIKE garlic. I also like crab, asparagus and lamb. But they appear not to like me too well.
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okay all you carnivores out there. i am deep frying my bird this year. i have only done it once or twice before a few years back. problem is, my injector is missing. any mcgyver's out there that can give me a tip on how to inject some flavor into the bird, or any pre-fry marinades????? lay it on me brothers and sisters nothing left to do but smile, smile, smile
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I am way, way too scared to deep fry a turkey. Even though I agree it is fabulously tasty.
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as long as you keep clear of anything flammable and don't put too much oil in the pot, there is nothing to it. and, it takes like a fration of the time to cook a decent sized bird. wish i could say that clean up is a breeze, but that is never the case on thansgiving, no matter how you do your thang!! nothing left to do but smile, smile, smile
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the injector is really the only way to do it right... and for dessert:
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what the hell was that joe??? i used to watch reruns of HH when i was a kid back in the 70's, but i never saw any ads like that one. (it was a commercial right??) nothing left to do but smile, smile, smile
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don't really know the origin of that bit... talk about product placement. it is a bit long for a standard TV commercial, but it was probably played at the end of a show-- kind of like the old days of TV ads where the game show host would mention the sponsor in every other sentence. by the by; you really do not want to see Bob Crane's home movie collection, that would kill anyone's Thanksgiving Day appetite. ( -;
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thanks for everything. and have a very healthful and GRATEFUL, wonderful, and hopeful thanksgiving. peace nothing left to do but smile, smile, smile
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thankx dear, gypsy soul. and to everyone, Happy Tofu Turkey Day! love and peace.
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TigerLilly & eojCC The pizza is wonderful !! Tonight we topped it with Red & Green Peppers, Black Olives, Red Onion, Cremini Mushrooms, and Mozzarella Cheese...
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Happy Thanksgiving :)
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Fresh from Spain***Clementines****** YUMMY!!
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Fresh from Spain***Clementines****** YUMMY!!
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Has Sunshine Daydream multiple-posting syndrome too!!! But Spanish clementines are really worth mentioning twice. Should try them as juice-is really really excellent, and more tart than normal orange juice.********************************** Don't part with your illusions. When they are gone, you will still exist, but you have ceased to live. Samuel Clemens
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Wild Blueberries served with meat isn't a new idea. Native Americans had been enjoying elk,salmon,buffalo and wild turkey with Blueberries long before Jerry Garcia ever played the guitar. Preheat oven to 420 degrees 2 tablespoons chopped shallots or onions 2 tablespoons butter or margarine 2 tablespoons flour 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme, crushed 1 tablespoon of pure olive oil 2 grams of finely ground "Mr. Nice" or "hashy" flavored kind bud 2 large "non-oppressed", organic chicken breasts 1 Tablespoon of Cajun seasonings 1/4 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed 1/2 cup each: dry red wine and water 1 (16.5-ounce) can Oregon Blueberries, drained Saute shallots in butter in small saucepan Add flour and herbs; cook and stir until mixture bubbles and thickens. Gradually add wine and water; stir in blueberries. Cook and stir until mixture thickens and boils; simmer 2 minutes. Makes 2 1/2 cups. Quickly dredge the chicken breasts in the Cajun seasonings Then in a hot cast iron pan add 1 tablespoon of pure olive oil and quickly stir in the ground marijuana and saute' off the chicken breasts applying weight or pressure to the exposed breasts pressing them against the hot pan. When the breasts reach the desired state of "blackened" remove from stovetop and place inpreheated oven, cook chicken in oven for an additional 20 minutes or to an internal temperature of 160 degrees. Remove when done and glaze the breasts with the savory Jurassic Blueberries sauce We like it best when served with with homemade cornbread stuffing and fresh organic veggies and champagne enjoy, jurassicblueberries
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See Lily Allen - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Spanish Jam
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great recipe jurassic, now because of u i am hungry and have to go eat...will definitely have to have a tasty bud appetizer first...thanx again! stay safe and feel good! >><<<< :>
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You have some awesome recipies!! I'll have to try them, they sound yummy :)I'm still eating clementines :)
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Electric Ravioli with Sensi-Pesto Tomato Sauce 2 whole cloves of Garlic finely chopped 1 shallot finely chopped 1 lemon pitted and juiced 1 small split of dry, red Italian wine 2 bunches of Green Onions cleaned, trimmed finely cut into small rounds 1 tablespoon of Pure Olive Oil 1 Large Bunch of Basil Chopped 2 grams of pine nuts 2 grams of finely ground, Cannabis Indica (Train Wreck, Northern Lights, Mr. Nice, Afghani Hash Plant, etc.) 2 - 28 oz cans of chopped Italian tomato’s 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon coarse ground black pepper 1 small can of tomato paste 1 table spoon high quality Extra Virgin olive oil 1 bag of frozen ravioli (any type you prefer) Fresh ground “Pecorino” Romano cheese Very important from this point the sauce must be assembled and it is important that all steps are taken in order. Preheat frying pan with the PURE olive oil, add garlic sauté until golden brown, then add green onions, shallot, pine nuts, Basil and Cannabis cook together swiftly for 1-2 minutes careful not to burn add lemon juice and red wine, salt and pepper cook together for an additional 1-2 minutes. Transfer mixture to a larger 5 quart sauce pot add tomato’s and tomato paste, then Extra Virgin Olive Oil cook off on medium heat for 45 minutes. Prepare ravioli by boiling as directed, serve immediately with fresh sauce and Romano Cheese, and Fresh Italian Bread and butter Dessert Suggestion: JurassicBlueberries Tartufu (Giant Blueberries stuffed into the center of Vanilla ice cream "Snow balls" dipped into dark chocolate)
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11 years 1 month
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I posted this on another forum, then thought I should search here:Has anyone who's lives in the snowier (if I may) regions ever had SNOW CREAM?? PEACE
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11 years 4 months
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it does sound yummy :) have to try it, if we ever get more snow!
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11 years 6 months
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my wife gave me a bread making machine at Christmas! What a brilliant gadget; throw in the ingredients, switch on, wait 3 hours and there is a delicious loaf of bread waiting for you. Yum.
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11 years 6 months
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we love the bread making machines! http://www.dead.net/forum/sat-down-my-supper?page=2 go back here (page 2of this thread) and you will find a couple of dough recipes that you can use in your bread maker, too. that is, set it to the dough making function rather than the actual 'bread' making fuction. those machines are grate, it saves all of the kneeding work. peace.
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11 years 6 months
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thanks for that CCJ, but I find the notion of brood recipes a little daunting at my age!!! ;-)
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11 years 6 months
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is that white Brood or .................... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Spanish Jam
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11 years 5 months
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is Dutch, or? I think so anyhow-so in that case WOULD be white brood, Bob, as is hard to find any other kind in Holland.********************************** Don't part with your illusions. When they are gone, you will still exist, but you have ceased to live. Samuel Clemens
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11 years 6 months
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I think CB was talking about a different kind of Brood! Bob - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Spanish Jam