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TigerLilly's picture
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Joined: Jul 2 2007
Extra virgin

* Extra-virgin olive oil (sometimes called EVOO) comes from the first pressing of the olives, contains no more than 0.8% acidity, and is judged to have a superior taste. There can be no refined oil in extra-virgin olive oil.
* Virgin olive oil has an acidity less than 2%, and judged to have a good taste. There can be no refined oil in virgin olive oil.
* Olive oil is a blend of virgin oil and refined oil, containing no more than 1.5% acidity. It commonly lacks a strong flavor.
* Olive-pomace oil is a blend of refined pomace olive oil and possibly some virgin oil. It is fit for consumption, but it may not be called olive oil. Olive-pomace oil is rarely found in a grocery store; it is often used for certain kinds of cooking in restaurants.
* Lampante oil is olive oil not used for consumption; lampante comes from olive oil's ancient use as fuel in oil-burning lamps. Lampante oil is mostly used in the industrial market.

Pasted from Wikipedia. So basically you are correct CC, with your guess about "extra virgin" meaning extra chaste oil.

marye's picture
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Joined: May 26 2007
I take your advice to heart.

the album, not so much.

c_c
c_c's picture
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Joined: Jun 4 2007
yeast v. baking soda

if you are using a standard cookie recipe with baking soda or a cake mix recipe with baking powder, you can eye-ball it without fear.

anything with yeast is a totally different story...

oh, and by the way, it is best to store your yeast in the freezer in an airtight container.

weigh schmei?

or use a scale?

up to you to get The Best of Bread, I suggest the latter...

peace.

marye's picture
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Joined: May 26 2007
okay...

I will heed your advice, but I've gone over half a century without using kitchen scales and it's a pretty alien concept.

On the other hand, bread really is pretty unforgiving, so I take this to heart.

I tend to stick to things like chocolate chip cookies, which I've made so many times I don't really have to think about it much. Though i will say the Kitchen Aid hand mixer changed my life.

c_c
c_c's picture
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Joined: Jun 4 2007
cups scmups

cups schmups... ( -;

small spoons are tea spoons.

big spoons are table spoons.

I stopped using cups long ago, it is much better to weigh it out and measure carefully. get a kitchen scale. OK, you do not need a triple beam balance rig... but a simple kitchen scale is fine. one you can re-calibrate after you put the bowl on top.

the crucially climacteric cup crisis, (if you weren't just busting my chops with the question) if you pour it quickly, or dig deeply and rashly into your sack of flour; the flour gets compressed and significantly increases the amount of weight. it totally fucks up the bread. I've been doing this for a long time. and continue to strive to get it 'just exactly perfect' ( -;

and, I've been waiting a very long time to have the opportunity to say "cups scmups" ( -:

peace.

marye's picture
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Joined: May 26 2007
but Joe...

what's that in cups and teaspoons?

c_c
c_c's picture
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Joined: Jun 4 2007
pizza dough

why not put this one in here, too

563 grams of bread flour
2.47 small spoons of dry yeast
1.97 small spoons of salt
2.13 big spoons of sugar (white or brown)
292 cc of luke warm water (never too hot or you will kill the yeast!)
2.37 table spoons of olive oil (extra virgin)

what the fuck is up with that 'Extra Virgin' thing... she won't even let you feel her up??

anyway, kneed it up, mix it up, mash it up for 27 minutes. let it rise for 43 minutes in a warm place.

roll it out into a round shape (or square if you want Sicilian pizza) thick or thin, up to you...

Napolitano is paper thin crust...

roll it out, put it into a teflon cooking pan, or use cooking wax paper. put the paper betewwn the pan and the dough. ( -;

put on the gravy (tomato sauce)

let it rise again for 26 minutes.

bake at 180 degrees celcious or 212 degrees farenheit for 16 minutes.

take it out, add the mozzerella cheese and other toppings (or a (substitute) soy cheese if you are a vegan)

turn the oven up to 200 degrees celcious if you want it crispy, or 190 if you want it softer, bake for another 14 minutes.

fresh, homemade pizza.

OR:

call Dominoes-- order what you like
smoke a big fattie in 8 minutes
wait 22 minutes.

( -;

peace.

c_c
c_c's picture
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Joined: Jun 4 2007
yup

yeah, I remembered you were in Germany, (ironic, right? isn't that guy Farenheit a German??!) so the flour is in grams (well, those I do know how to convert in my head) and the temp. in celcius.

180 works fine, but for those in America with Farenheit you can use this simple system to convert the temp:

Tf = (9/5)*Tc+32; Tc = temperature in degrees Celsius, Tf = temperature in degrees Fahrenheit

For example, suppose you have a Fahrenheit temperature of 98.6 degrees and you wanted to convert it into degrees on the Celsius scale. Using the above formula, you would first subtract 32 from the Fahrenheit temperature and get 66.6 as a result. Then you multiply 66.6 by five-ninths and get the converted value of 37 degrees Celsius.
Assume that you have a Celsius scale temperature of 100 degrees and you wish to convert it into degrees on the Fahrenheit scale. Using the stated formula, you first multiply the Celsius scale temperature reading by nine-fifths and get a result of 180. Then add 32 to 180 and get the final converted result of 212 degrees on the Fahrenheit scale.

To convert the grams removed to pounds you take the grams, multiply by .002205 to get pounds. For Ex:
1000 grams = 2.205 lbs
950 grams = 2.094 lbs
500 grams = 1.1025 lbs

OK, cracking wise again, but the conversions and the math needed are true.

if only I could learn how to spell celcius...

I also use apples, bannanas, raisins, etc. etc.

in a separate recipe, I even cut up onions into small bits and add it into the bread, too. (or pizza dough)

by the way, with berries or other fruit, depending on how ripe they are, you may need to add a bit more flour as you are kneeding it. you do not want the dough to be sticky, and you do not want it to be 'dusty' there is a happy median; which you will find.

peace.

KJ7XJ's picture
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Joined: Jun 16 2007
Thanks CC Joe

...Now I have no excuse not to use all those damn berries in yard...Im printing recp. out and will give it a try as time permits

Eric

TigerLilly's picture
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Joined: Jul 2 2007
Glad you were so clever

as to give the temperature in degrees celcius. Will give me more time to put into all that kneading, by not having to make an attempt at calculating between degrees farenheit and celcius.Still will have to wing it that can find the EXACT spot between 180 and 190 on my oven dial, as this dial only goes in increments of 10 degrees, stupid thing. And I DO sincerely want to give my best attempt at "just exactly perfect French Bread", thus will follow your recipe exactly down to the 32 minutes.

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