• https://www.dead.net/features/philly-89-now-available
    Philly '89 Now Available

    Here’s a cool way to kick off the new year and decade: with Crimson, White and Indigo, a DVD/3-CD set that captures every second of the Grateful Dead’s superb July 7, 1989 concert at Philadelphia’s John F. Kennedy Stadium. If you loved the popular 2005 DVD/CD release Truckin’ Up to Buffalo, from July 4, 1989, well, this is the very next show: why, it’s practically like being on tour without having to pitch in gas money, eat bad road food, swelter in the heat or score a miracle ticket. Nope, all the work has been done for you—from the crisp multiple-camera shoot (with no video effects, you’ll be happy to hear) produced from the tastefully executed live screen video feed directed by long-time Grateful Dead collaborator and concert video guru Len Dell'Amico, to the crystal clear and powerful audio, mixed from the original 24-track analog tapes in both Dolby Digital stereo and 5.1 surround (for the DVD), and mastered in HDCD (for the CD). But the proof is (always!) in the playing, and this show from the sizzling summer of ’89 tour is sure to please both hard core and casual fans with its energy, diverse song list and passionate playing.

    Two years removed from the craziness that surrounded the “comeback” tour of 1987 and the Dead’s unprecedented flirtation with mainstream success—thanks to “Touch of Grey” and the In the Dark album—the group was still riding the crest of that wave and attracting thousands of new fans with each passing tour. The summer of ’89 began in style for the Dead on the solstice itself with a nationally televised/broadcast concert from Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, Calif. A week and a half later, the GD circus hit the road for seven East Coast stadium shows, followed by a handful in Midwest amphitheaters. The group was in excellent form throughout, offering a great selection of old and recent favorites, and polishing some of the new songs which would make up their album-in-progress at the time, Built to Last. Visually, the Dead’s stage set that summer was perhaps the most spectacular they ever mounted—designed by noted Czech artist Jan Sawka, it consisted of dozens of enormous painted canvas panels covered with various patterns, colors and shapes—some abstract, some concrete; quite an amazing sight in an enormous stadium.

    In what would turn out to be the final rock concert in Philly’s JFK Stadium (the first was The Beatles in August 1966; the aging stadium itself dated back to 1926), the Grateful Dead come out on a brutally hot afternoon (after a fine opening set by Bruce Hornsby & the Range) with rock ’n’ roll on their minds. “Hell in a Bucket” is an appropriate opening choice for a day that is nearly hot as Hades, and then Jerry takes the party to the next level with a truly inspired “Iko Iko.” He’s all smiles, and that’s always a good sign! From there, the first set dips into some blues (“Little Red Rooster”), Hunter-Garcia classics like “Ramble on Rose” and “Loser,” a potent version of Dylan’s “Stuck Inside of Mobile with the Memphis Blues Again,” a wonderfully exploratory version of “Let It Grow,” and finally, Brent Mydland’s still-newish anthem “Blow Away,” which is one of his finest performances of that rockin’ tune.

    You gotta love a second set that opens with a warm and inviting “Box of Rain”—peppy and nicely sung—and then right on its heels a “Scarlet Begonias” > “Fire on the Mountain” that is as “up” and celebratory as you could hope for: The “Scarlet” breezes along with joyous purpose, and the “Fire” hits all sorts of mighty peaks; at nearly 25 minutes, it’s a spectacular pairing. “Estimated Prophet” is marked by a smoldering intensity and then the jam that follows settles into the majestic Hunter-Garcia ballad “Standing on the Moon,” surely one of their greatest late-era compositions, and played only seven times before this standout version. The DVD depiction of the “Rhythm Devils” percussion duel gives us a fascinating glimpse of the tools and techniques Mickey and Bill used to create their magical alchemy, and then, following “Space,” the band launches into a hair-raising, careening “Other One” (dig how the camera shows us Phil’s rumbling bass intro up close!), Jerry takes us down to the docks of the city for an emotional “Wharf Rat,” and Bob gets back into party-mode for the concluding “Lovelight.” The encore of Dylan’s “Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door” offers a beautiful grace note for a show that has taken us through so many different spaces and moods.

    The beautifully designed package for Crimson, White and Indigo (the name comes from a line in “Standing on the Moon,” of course) includes loads of great photos by Bob Minkin and an essay from veteran Grateful Dead observer Steve Silberman. All in all it’s a wonderful show from a great year!

    --Blair Jackson

    TRACKLIST

    CD 1
    1. Hell In A Bucket
    2. Iko Iko
    3. Little Red Rooster
    4. Ramble On Rose
    5. Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again
    6. Loser
    7. Let It Grow
    8. Blow Away

    CD 2
    1. Box Of Rain
    2. Scarlet Begonias
    3. Fire On The Mountain
    4. Estimated Prophet
    5. Standing On The Moon
    6. Rhythm Devils

    CD 3
    1. Space
    2. The Other One
    3. Wharf Rat
    4. Turn On Your Lovelight
    5. Knockin' On Heaven's Door

    DVD
    DVD tracklist is same as CD

    16273
253 comments
sort by
Recent
Reset
Items displayed
  • Default Avatar
    Offthebusalongtime
    13 years 1 month ago
    7/7/89
    I had the privilege of being at this show and the July 4th show in Buffalo. Those shows were rocking. Phila was so hot during the day and I just cooked. The energy of the Box into Scarlet is sick. My favorite scarlet and sotm of all time.
  • Default Avatar
    lovecraft
    13 years 5 months ago
    Not as bad as I thought
    I've been listening to the tracks available at the "listening party" (ROR, LIG, & FOTM). Not nearly as bad as I expected it to be, based on all the reviews. True, the drums could have a lot more presence, but they're not entirely inaudible (as some people seemed to be suggesting). Some creative EQing and it sounded fine. 1989 was "my year;" I saw virtually every show they played that year, and loved every minute of it. So many peak moments that year. It's nice to have official releases of some of them, like the three summer shows that are available (when is DFH going to come out on DVD??!?!), the "Bobby's Birthday" show, and now this and the Warlocks box set. If this were a CD-only release, I might not bother, as the SQ really isn't that great. But to have the DVD makes it worth it. As for sound quality, though, the Warlocks set seems pretty fantastic. Only heard the Listening Party cuts so far, but the mix is superb. That's a must-have. Many thanks to the powers that be for making these shows available.
  • marye
    13 years 5 months ago
    heh
    gone now...
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

14 years 10 months

Here’s a cool way to kick off the new year and decade: with Crimson, White and Indigo, a DVD/3-CD set that captures every second of the Grateful Dead’s superb July 7, 1989 concert at Philadelphia’s John F. Kennedy Stadium. If you loved the popular 2005 DVD/CD release Truckin’ Up to Buffalo, from July 4, 1989, well, this is the very next show: why, it’s practically like being on tour without having to pitch in gas money, eat bad road food, swelter in the heat or score a miracle ticket. Nope, all the work has been done for you—from the crisp multiple-camera shoot (with no video effects, you’ll be happy to hear) produced from the tastefully executed live screen video feed directed by long-time Grateful Dead collaborator and concert video guru Len Dell'Amico, to the crystal clear and powerful audio, mixed from the original 24-track analog tapes in both Dolby Digital stereo and 5.1 surround (for the DVD), and mastered in HDCD (for the CD). But the proof is (always!) in the playing, and this show from the sizzling summer of ’89 tour is sure to please both hard core and casual fans with its energy, diverse song list and passionate playing.

Two years removed from the craziness that surrounded the “comeback” tour of 1987 and the Dead’s unprecedented flirtation with mainstream success—thanks to “Touch of Grey” and the In the Dark album—the group was still riding the crest of that wave and attracting thousands of new fans with each passing tour. The summer of ’89 began in style for the Dead on the solstice itself with a nationally televised/broadcast concert from Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, Calif. A week and a half later, the GD circus hit the road for seven East Coast stadium shows, followed by a handful in Midwest amphitheaters. The group was in excellent form throughout, offering a great selection of old and recent favorites, and polishing some of the new songs which would make up their album-in-progress at the time, Built to Last. Visually, the Dead’s stage set that summer was perhaps the most spectacular they ever mounted—designed by noted Czech artist Jan Sawka, it consisted of dozens of enormous painted canvas panels covered with various patterns, colors and shapes—some abstract, some concrete; quite an amazing sight in an enormous stadium.

In what would turn out to be the final rock concert in Philly’s JFK Stadium (the first was The Beatles in August 1966; the aging stadium itself dated back to 1926), the Grateful Dead come out on a brutally hot afternoon (after a fine opening set by Bruce Hornsby & the Range) with rock ’n’ roll on their minds. “Hell in a Bucket” is an appropriate opening choice for a day that is nearly hot as Hades, and then Jerry takes the party to the next level with a truly inspired “Iko Iko.” He’s all smiles, and that’s always a good sign! From there, the first set dips into some blues (“Little Red Rooster”), Hunter-Garcia classics like “Ramble on Rose” and “Loser,” a potent version of Dylan’s “Stuck Inside of Mobile with the Memphis Blues Again,” a wonderfully exploratory version of “Let It Grow,” and finally, Brent Mydland’s still-newish anthem “Blow Away,” which is one of his finest performances of that rockin’ tune.

You gotta love a second set that opens with a warm and inviting “Box of Rain”—peppy and nicely sung—and then right on its heels a “Scarlet Begonias” > “Fire on the Mountain” that is as “up” and celebratory as you could hope for: The “Scarlet” breezes along with joyous purpose, and the “Fire” hits all sorts of mighty peaks; at nearly 25 minutes, it’s a spectacular pairing. “Estimated Prophet” is marked by a smoldering intensity and then the jam that follows settles into the majestic Hunter-Garcia ballad “Standing on the Moon,” surely one of their greatest late-era compositions, and played only seven times before this standout version. The DVD depiction of the “Rhythm Devils” percussion duel gives us a fascinating glimpse of the tools and techniques Mickey and Bill used to create their magical alchemy, and then, following “Space,” the band launches into a hair-raising, careening “Other One” (dig how the camera shows us Phil’s rumbling bass intro up close!), Jerry takes us down to the docks of the city for an emotional “Wharf Rat,” and Bob gets back into party-mode for the concluding “Lovelight.” The encore of Dylan’s “Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door” offers a beautiful grace note for a show that has taken us through so many different spaces and moods.

The beautifully designed package for Crimson, White and Indigo (the name comes from a line in “Standing on the Moon,” of course) includes loads of great photos by Bob Minkin and an essay from veteran Grateful Dead observer Steve Silberman. All in all it’s a wonderful show from a great year!

--Blair Jackson

TRACKLIST

CD 1
1. Hell In A Bucket
2. Iko Iko
3. Little Red Rooster
4. Ramble On Rose
5. Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again
6. Loser
7. Let It Grow
8. Blow Away

CD 2
1. Box Of Rain
2. Scarlet Begonias
3. Fire On The Mountain
4. Estimated Prophet
5. Standing On The Moon
6. Rhythm Devils

CD 3
1. Space
2. The Other One
3. Wharf Rat
4. Turn On Your Lovelight
5. Knockin' On Heaven's Door

DVD
DVD tracklist is same as CD

Display on homepage featured list
Off
Custom Teaser

Here’s a cool way to kick off the new year and decade: with Crimson, White & Indigo, a DVD/3-CD set that captures every second of the Grateful Dead’s superb July 7, 1989 concert at Philadelphia’s John F. Kennedy Stadium. If you loved the popular 2005 DVD/CD release Truckin’ Up to Buffalo, from July 4, 1989, well, this is the very next show: why, it’s practically like being on tour without having to pitch in gas money, eat bad road food, swelter in the heat or score a miracle ticket. Nope, all the work has been done for you—from the crisp multiple-camera shoot (with no video effects, you’ll be happy to hear) produced from the tastefully executed live screen video feed directed by long-time Grateful Dead collaborator and concert video guru Len Dell'Amico, to the crystal clear and powerful audio, mixed from the original 24-track analog tapes in both Dolby Digital stereo and 5.1 surround (for the DVD), and mastered in HDCD (for the CD). But the proof is (always!) in the playing, and this show from the sizzling summer of ’89 tour is sure to please both hard core and casual fans with its energy, diverse song list and passionate playing.

dead comment

user picture

Member for

16 years 8 months
Permalink

the set arrived in France today courtesy of Amazon for US$36.47 including shipping. Would have been around $52 had I ordered here. Anyway enough of that: I am watching the DVD now and am really enjoying the ride. So thanks very much to all concerned for getting this out . We used to hate those Leslie cabinets when I was working as a stage crew in London: they were really heavy, the battered wooden cabinets were full of splinters and many of them were near antiques and quite fragile. Big trouble if you dropped one! Moving the Hammond B3s that normally went with them was no fun either.
user picture

Member for

16 years 8 months
Permalink

Decades ago, when I first started collecting shows, everyone was great. I was fascinated with every show, regardless of their rankings in Deadbase. Now, as I have hundreds in my collection, I'm more critical. This show is a great example. While it is not a BAD show, it really has nothing (especially post Drumz) that is GREAT either. Oddly enough, I enjoyed the first set more than the second. What would REALLY be nice is some great 82-84 material that the Vault seems reluctant to release (hint, hint).
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

15 years 1 month
Permalink

I still haven't received the DVD yet. I understand that they are at the mercy of the Post Office, and that if I had wanted tracking I should have paid for it. However, I called dead.net's 800 number and got someone apparently in India who read from a script to me in barely understandable English. Frankly, I don't need this. I'm not a bigot, and I love to hear a beautiful foreign accent. But when I pay a premium to buy directly from dead.net I expect to get a fluent English speaker from customer service who can speak without a script and understands what it is she is reading - and hopefully belongs to a union and makes a good wage. From now on out I will buy from Amazon or a "local" big-boxer, since Mom and Pop shops have been successfully eradicated from America by "free"-market monopolies. John Barlow can take his union-busting, wage-lowering, Libertarian, Republican "free" market bull**** and go straight to H-E double hockey sticks with it. He and Bob Weir can turn that into a song if they want to.

Member for

16 years 3 months
Permalink

This is a down and dirty Dead show, probably my favorite '89 release. The setlist is great. There are no awkward or questionable songs to ruin the flow of the vibe. There is a confident and mischievous vibe throughout. The band sounds like it is collectively in high spirits. Every song is played strongly. The first set is brilliant, with every song a smooth '89 era standout. The second set is just as strong. 'Fire on the Mountain' stretches, but never gets boring, with Phil being most notable rolling out sweet bass lines. The 'Other One' is naturally psychedelic and doesn't sound forced and the whole band pitches in to make some very artful music. Overall this release is part of what I love about the Dead: a very Grateful Dead set list with the whole band going for it non-stop. I did think the drums sounded a little distant, but this doesn't detract from my overall enjoyment. BTW I emailed customer service regarding my order. They emailed me back within 24 hours and said the order had been processed. I waited a week and it showed up. That's at least the 10th order I've placed without any problems. Thanks Dead.net! P.S. To the guy bashing John Barlow, Republicans, and Libertarians; try a web search for Bill Clinton and NAFTA. Perhaps you will discover the source of some your angst. 'In fact your salvation is within yourself, in your own essence of mind, it is not to be gotten grasping at external people like me.' ~ Jack Kerouac
user picture

Member for

14 years 4 months
Permalink

Hey everyone! Just picked this one up! ABSOLUTELY amazing! Already been through the whole show - audio and DVD! What a great way to spend a Friday night! Barnes and Noble were selling it for $42.99 - but best Buy has it for $30.00 Would have loved some sort of bonus material, but hey! What can ya do? RJ
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

15 years 1 month
Permalink

despite all the warnings that I read about problems people encounter ordering stuff directly from this site, I decided that I would order this DVD from here anyway. I pre-ordered shorly after the sale opened. My card was charged on 4-21-10.... got my confirmation email that the package has shipped. Still no DVD.... Called customer service.... lady said give it another week.... that was a week ago... The DVD is shipping from Mass. I live in Pa..... should have been here by now... I will report back.
user picture

Member for

16 years 8 months
Permalink

bummer. Will report this. Please send me a PM with your order details if this hasn't resolved itself by the time you read this.
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

16 years 8 months
Permalink

I was able to purchase this set at Borders for $21.60 using a 40% off coupon and $5 worth of Borders bucks, sweet deal for a complete Grateful Dead concert on CD & DVD! I see that some of the Dick’s Picks CDs are not showing up for purchase on the dead.net site, for example Vols 32 through 34. Anyone know if the Dick’s Picks CD series going out-of-print or just back-ordered? I hope the latter. If they are just back-ordered, dead.net should indicated that on the site, the scammers on eBay and Amazon are using this to drive up the prices of their Dick’s Picks sales through the roof and taking business away from dead.net.
user picture

Member for

16 years 8 months
Permalink

I think they're just on hiatus, but this is useful info and I'll pass it on.
user picture

Member for

13 years 10 months
Permalink

I got notified by BarnesandNoble.com this week that they are selling it for $25.16 with free shipping with no coupons. I am not complaining because I bought it from another outlet for $29.99 with free shipping and it was delivered two days after the release date.
user picture

Member for

15 years 1 month
Permalink

Just a quick note on my findings with the sound quality of the DVD. Mind you, this is from a bozo with a regular DVD player, mid-level amp and high quality speakers (regular stereo, not surround). I found the mix to be fair to good and have to echo the comment about the drums-- where are they in the mix, especially during the first set (I think it improves in set 2). They are definitely low in the mix, other than the high-hat and cymbals. I did not find Brent to be lacking in any spots. I have only listened to the cds in the car, so I will not comment on those. My thinking is that there was uneven mixing happening at shows during this era. I have found all the late 1980s dvd releases to have some anomoly in the sound. One that comes to mind is a terrible mix in the first set of the Pittsburgh show where all I hear in some songs are Mickey's cymbals. In all honesty, I think the mixes on the Grateful Dead Movie and Winterland are far superior.
user picture

Member for

15 years 1 month
Permalink

That said, I very much enjoy this release despite some issues with the mix. The first set is fantastic with an amazing Blow Away finish. Having never caugh BA live, it was great to see Brent do it after listening to the Dozin' version all these years. The band really appears to be enjoying the time. Really fine show.
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

15 years 1 month
Permalink

My order finally arrived. So now I can officially go from whining about customer service and GD off-shoring and begin officially whineing about the sound quality. It is atrocious. As another poster noted, the first track sounds like a high quality audience recording. And as has been noted by numerous others, there ain't no bass drums. This is what the Dead would sound like if the drummers where limited to cymbals and snares. This is appalling, specially disconcerting during the Scarlet/Fire transition. Without the strong bass rhythm section it falls apart. There doesn't appear to be any low end at all in the mix. When Phil drops down onto the low E string we get a bass boom that blurrs any individual bass notes and sounds like a teenager cruising Santa Monica in a boom car. I am a bozo and no longer own any high end equipment, but believe this would be pitiful on any equipment. I notice that it (both stereo and 5.1) was mixed not by the legendary (and magnificent pagan god) Jeffery Norman, but rather by a certain Michael McGinn located in Boulder, CO. I think that is the problem. Can we start a petition to deny this Mr. McGinn access to any further GD source material forever and anon? Apparently he just doesn't get what the GD sound is all about. God, we miss you Jeffery Norman. Please come back to the fold.
user picture

Member for

16 years 8 months
Permalink

I am, of course, also a bozo - but I do have a high-quality sound system (see the thread elsewhere on this site about sound systems). I can confirm that clmartin's belief that that this release would sound pitiful on any equipment is pretty much valid. What is good and correct in the mix does sound very, very good - but it ain't all good and correct in the mix. Even a good sound system cannot do anything about the muffled and almost inaudible drums and what bass there is is not tight and crisp. Things improve slightly after the first three tracks, but it never gets to be as good as it should be. When one considers the quality of some other releases from here that were mastered from 2-track cassettes and other potentially dodgy sources, then think about the fact that this release was mixed and mastered from 24-track tapes, one has to ask what went wrong here. I must admit I had not noticed that Jeffery Norman was not responsible this time around. Is it a coincidence that he is absent and we get a below-par release from what should be an impeccable source? All that said, the show is great - the guys were obviously into it and playing with enthusiasm and there are some great versions here. Shame about the end result.
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

15 years 1 month
Permalink

Am I the only one that noticed the absence of the Jeff Norman? And I thought I was the amatuer Dead Head here. I'm just a dabbler in Deadheadism, and I caught this? Ha. Actually, there is a lot to like about this release. The performance is excellent IMO, apart from the usual Brent Mydland cringe inducing moments. Despite the liner notes, I find Blow Away to be embarrassing. But I digress. I love the rare live sound, especially on Jerry's guitar, mixed right there upfront and good and loud as it should be. You never forget when listening to this that its live. That I like.
user picture

Member for

15 years 1 month
Permalink

"The sound is terrible" The very next post is "The show is great" Sounds like our governmnet trying to make a decision. "Here's my half a dollar if you dare .. double twist when you hit the air. Look at Julie down below .. the levee doing the dopaso"
user picture

Member for

15 years 1 month
Permalink

Was over the top, sure, but that is what set him apart from all the other keyboardists. However I'm still trying to figure out the cringe inducing moments. "Here's my half a dollar if you dare .. double twist when you hit the air. Look at Julie down below .. the levee doing the dopaso"
user picture

Member for

16 years 8 months
Permalink

Just was on amazon's website and found this title for 31.98 plus free shipping. Not cool...
user picture

Member for

16 years 3 months
Permalink

I've always loved Brent's backing vocals, but sometimes his lead vocals remind me (painfully so) of Frank Stallone's cheesy singing from the 80s (do you guys remember him?). However, as the years have gone by, Brent's tunes (and his singing) have grown on me. 'Blow Away' is an especially good tune and this version is terrific.
user picture

Member for

13 years 10 months
Permalink

When Brent Mydland joined the band in 1979 he added some rejuvenation to the band after Keith Godchaux hit some rough spots and finally had to leave. Brent initially had a higher pitch if you listen to the earlier stuff and the harmonies were actually bearable. Shortly thereafter he changed over to this growly tone which was not very soothing to everyones ears that were used to the three part harmonies the Dead were famous for in the early 70's before Phil lost his singing ability and the 76 thru 78 era with Donna. During Brent's change from high pitch to growly tone a lot of singers were trying to imiate Michael McDonald was this style was very popular.Maybe that was why. If you listen to some shows during the 80's Jerry's voice was very raspy and he almost made a full recovery in the late 80's to his 70's era great singing ability. Bob seemed to have the most consistant vocal ability over the whole Dead era. Built to Last with the high concentration of Mydland tunes won't ever be voted the best Grateful Dead album of all time goes without saying.
user picture

Member for

16 years 7 months
Permalink

These are good comments about the sound quality. I don’t see this as whining or disrespectful; I see it as an objective critique of how this production of the concert turned out. It baffles me how different the sound of this DVD is as compared to the Buffalo one. I find that the latter is about as good as it gets whereas this one pales in comparison (although it still sounds nice : \). How can this be when the concerts were only days apart in time and were presumably recorded with the same equipment? If the difference is due to Norman vs. McGinn, that is very telling.
user picture

Member for

16 years 8 months
Permalink

I like this more and more with each listen. I agree with the sound difference from CD to DVD, with the CD's sounding better to me. The drums on the DVD during Rhythm Devils looks completely off, and Box of Rain might as well be an instrumental. (Was glad to hear those vocals on the CD.) But I watched the DVD once and may never watch it again so not too worried about it. Would rather have the choice to buy CD seperate from the DVD. To me the most powerful moment in this show is the Wharf Rat when Jerry and Brent sing the: 'But I'll get back on my feet someday The good lord willing, if he says I may I know that the life I'm living's no good I'll get a new start, live the life I should I'll get up and fly away I'll get up and fly away' It really hit me the other day hearing that song sound so strong. The emotions really come through the vocal and it sounds like its coming from the gut. I also dig the Iko Iko with the additional lyrics, since I've heard versions before, but never had a one of my own. Of course the Standing on the Moon is as good as ever, and with my brother still in Afganistan a lot of those lyrics are almost like a prayer to me right now. Overall I'm glad I love pretty much all Grateful Dead and this will find a lot of time in the rotation for years to come. Just digging some Pure Jerry Lunt-Fontanne this morning. The Acoustic Band stuff is so good, you know those good ole boys were just grooving having a good time!! Thanks.
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

16 years 7 months
Permalink

no "new" dead for me, and that's anything after 1981, that's my cutoff point for grateful dead, peak years, healthwise, etc.. except for Garcia and Kahn duo stuff which I dig. I stick with '66-'81, regardless of including dvd, i'll wait for more good "old" gd.

Member for

16 years 8 months
Permalink

New England, that's so funny you'd articulate the difference in the "early" (sweet) and what I'd call "classic" (growly, Michael McDonald-esque).... I entered the bus with the latter and (perhaps therefore) much prefer it. That little bit o' grit just made his harmonies on stuff like Know You Rider and Uncle John's Band classic and unique, and very much a boy's club rather than subbing for Donna's harmony, which are what his early harmonies sound like to me. To the extent that I have any @#$#ing idea, he was in a bit of a weird space this summer; the first set of the show I saw at RFK featured an expletive-spiced Far From Me (which I was, selfishly in retrospect, psyched for because it's the only one I ever saw) and saw him opening his piano solo on Friend of the Devil with what was obviously a mistaken effect, which he quickly switched off. However, by the second set, he was dueling with Bruce on his piano and all smiles. The footage doesn't lie ~ he's having a ball at Buffalo (Truckin' Up...) and Alpine (Downhill From Here), and he and Jerry are sharing great moments. As to the sound, I haven't picked this up yet (only a matter of time, surely), and I hope that Jeffrey's distinguished run as Mastering Master isn't over. But I will say this ~ he mastered the Cal Expo '93 Road Trips, and that sounds pretty sub-par (very loud 'n muddy mix) on my modest CD player. I was really surprised, given the vintage. Of course, different tapes from different tapers in different years will sound different, and this largely adds character ~ the Dick's from August '74, for example, with the big bright Wall of Sound vs. the rich mixes of the Rhein '72 or the midwest Feb '73 Dick's. But I find the Cal Expo mastering hard on the ears. Hope this one isn't like that. Great setlist (though I wish Memphis Blues were Brother Esau ; )

Member for

16 years 8 months
Permalink

My first sentence above was referring to Brent's voice. Somehow I failed to finish my sentence, or deleted some of it.
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

14 years 8 months
Permalink

How about for a new Road Trips...1970. Make sure disc 2 is Sept. 19, 1970 (Dark Star through the end of the show) and disc 1 whatever fill it out! Just a thought....thanks!
user picture

Member for

16 years 8 months
Permalink

I logged in for two reasons today: 1) to give props to customer service. My CW&I showed up with a defective Disc 1, and they promptly sent out a replacement. Unfortunately, that replacement was smashed in the post, cleaved nearly clean in half. I let Dead.net know of this predicament and lo, post haste another replacement was sent out, which I received yesterday. Once again, kudos to customer service. So this would be my third copy of Disc One. It also does not work. Which leads me to 2) Quality control. How can it be that I keep getting a bunk copy of the same disc? As far as I can tell, no one else has had this problem. It's not my player; I have played thousands of cds on it, burned discs, MP3 discs... it plays through everything! Is it really just not meant to be? I'll let customer service know, of course, but I really don't even want another replacement. I don't wanna tempt fate anymore. I'm just gonna ask for a partial refund. I'll find a nice-sounding aud from archive and stick that one in the case. Yeesh. All of that said, the stuff I'm able to listen to (and watch) sounds great.
user picture

Member for

16 years 8 months
Permalink

At least you get all the music on the DVD so you don't actually miss out on anything - except the possibility to listen to disc 1 in your car. So quality control remains an issue, but it is strange that you got two dud copies of disc 1 whilst I have not seen any other reports of a non-functioning disc 1. I have no idea how many copies of any given release they sell on this site, but I am pretty sure that a high percentage of the problems get mentioned here, One of the benefits of shopping on this site is that there is always a forum ready and waiting for people to air their views (and grievances). When one buys from Amazon or the like, one has no idea how many lemons they send out and have to replace. Based on how many CDs I buy each year (for decades now) and the number of faulty discs I receive, the percentage of duds is very very low (much lower than 1%). Based on what I read here, the percentage of faulty GD discs from here is somewhat higher. This only seems to have been a problem since Rhino took over. Coincidence? I'll let you draw your own conclusions. Moral: don't cut corners to try to maximize profit - do it right.
user picture

Member for

15 years 1 month
Permalink

I too purchase many CD's and have never ever received a CD that flat out didn't work. My percentage is 0%. Scratched sure, but cannot be read in a CD player?? Huh?? So it is surprising to hear the stories about dud discs. How can a commercialy supplied CD be a dud? That is a serious quality issue and simply cannot happen if you want to run a successful business. It's like buying a car and find out there is no engine in it. I mean its mind boggling! "Here's my half a dollar if you dare .. double twist when you hit the air. Look at Julie down below .. the levee doing the dopaso"
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

16 years 5 months
Permalink

Just a quick thanks to all involved for another fantastic release. Given my many problems with ordering, I waited for my local (Australian) shop to get it in for me - and at $60 Aust it was actually the same price as ordering online with high shipping costs. Anyway, both sets just power - and the DVD is a treat. My neighbours might not think so, but I love the sound on this, although the bottom end seems missing at times. So thanks again.
user picture

Member for

16 years
Permalink

What's up with Jerry releases/website, etc-does anyone out there who is "in the know" know? Seems like everything ramped up and then ramped down again-or is it just me being hyper, overbearing, anxious to hear more or the like. We were treated to some excellant releases a while back and I am hungry for more of them.
user picture

Member for

16 years 8 months
Permalink

Yeah, I thought it was very odd too - honestly, I'm not sure I've ever gotten a faulty brand-new disc before, let alone 2 in a row of the same one, with no mentions of this problem from anyone else on Dead.net - and if there's anything we know about Dead.net, the people are not shy about airing grievances. That said, my order was refunded promptly after I reported the latest developments of this debacle yesterday. So again, kudos to customer service - who, like Bear back in the day, seem to receive the brunt of complaints around here when things go wrong. They've been prompt and pleasant throughout this whole ordeal. And as usual thanks again to MaryE as well, for fielding these issues.
user picture

Member for

16 years 3 months
Permalink

Yeah, I'm with Underthevolcano. What happened to the Jerry releases? Can anyone comment?
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

15 years 1 month
Permalink

I too got a bad disc 1. I haven't tried it in my home CD player - always listen via the DVD in the house - but in my car disc 1 hangs during Blow Away. Irritating but not a big problem because after the first listen I always hit skip on that song any way, and it's the last track on disc 1. It hangs. I eject. Life goes on.
user picture

Member for

16 years 8 months
Permalink

I pre-ordered, have been advised shipping date was 17 April, still no show. Customer Service is sending out a replacement. There may be something to be said for consistency, but I think that is meant to be consistently good service. Happy Trails
user picture

Member for

16 years 8 months
Permalink

I've just been watching/listening again to the whole show and I remain very impressed. It ain't perfect but it is full of small pleasures with a few sustained high spots. As for annoyances, well there are a few, but I am not going to dwell on them. There have been some harsh words about the sound. Well the drums are a little far back and tinny but I can live with that, better too far back than too far forward. But for me the mix of the front line guys is fantastic.. In particular Phil is just in the perfect spot in the mix and astonishingly good, you can hear Bobby's guitar (unlike in Trucking up to Buffalo), Brent is right in there, and you can hear every single thing Jerry does. What I just realised is this: Bobby and Brent and Mickey (the skinny guys) seem to have to just about burst every blood vessel to get to the emotional and musical places that Jerry and Phil and Bill (the beefy guys) get to apparently effortlessly. Somehow altogether it works...mostly ;-)
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

14 years 6 months
Permalink

come on whats the hold up whats next?
user picture

Member for

16 years 8 months
Permalink

Boxsets appear to coincide with the Christmas trade - but what's up with the Road Trips? It's a month behind schedule already.
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

14 years 6 months
Permalink

the last two years box sets came out this time of year not christmas.Winterland 73 late spring of 08 and last year june winterland 77.Whats this years box set how about early 80s.
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

14 years 6 months
Permalink

i thought this was box set time of year winterland 77 came out in october 09 i thought it came out last june winterland 73 came out in april 08.Anyway its road trips time for sure.They will anounce it any day i bet.Cant wait.
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

14 years 10 months
Permalink

I've watched this up to the beginning of Estimated. I'll just give my 2 cents as far as the sound quality is concerned. It's not as good as Truckin' Up To Buffalo. I think I can see why this show was released, it's a very good performance. The first set is uniformly solid and energetic, Jerry is really "on," and the band is tight and cohesive. It's just that unfortunately the sound is a little blurry, the drums do kind of fade in and out and none of the instruments seem to have a consistent place in the mix, other than perhaps the bass, which after some early problems stays pretty good and loud. Maybe it's the engineering, maybe it's the tapes, maybe both. Phil's mike does have problems during Box of Rain, it's just not up front like it should be. That isn't to say you can't enjoy this release, but it does detract somewhat. I think the 5.1 version is better than the stereo version. But as I said, the performance is very good, and during this era that wasn't always guaranteed, even during the "comeback" years of 88-91. I think the pros definitely outweigh the cons, but you should be aware of the sonic flaws before you get this.
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

14 years 10 months
Permalink

I want to amend, somewhat, my earlier comments. I don't mean to give this a negative review. There's a lot to like about this release: great performance, and a very nice video. This has multiple cameramen walking around filming in the same way they did the Grateful Dead Movie, so it makes it very entertaining. And the interaction and obvious enthusiasm of the band is a real treat to watch. As I said earlier, I think that's a big part of why this was released. There's hardly a blown lyric and only a few minor flaws that are quickly overcome. It's really late-era brilliance at its finest. Excellent Scarlet>Fire and Wharf Rat and a fine Heaven's Door encore. I think there might have been some problems with the source tapes, but it's not like they're terrible or anything. The sound is just a little diffuse and maybe not quite as good as you'd expect from such a deluxe release. It gets better during Drums>Space. Anyway, I would recommend this if you're a fan of the late-era, or just a fan. It goes nicely with the other '89 releases. Many Heads are of the opinion that the later years don't match up with 65-75, and they may be right, but 1989 was a very good year, and they showed they still had it. It has its own particular charms. They were still a very, very good band at this point as this release shows.
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

13 years 6 months
Permalink

oh a new post on crimson white and indigo,got excied about it and look what we have above,and the user name is charity lol.