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  • daverock
    Joined:
    Spiral Light was good

    That really moved things up a gear for me with The Dead. Not just the magazine, with it's great reviews, articles and news items, but also because through them I was able to access tapes. In fact, if I am a Deadhead, I would date it from about 1987, when this happened. Up to that point I had all the official albums and the odd bootleg, but from then on I was getting tapes delivered regularly. And once you discover one source, others seem to open up too. Great stuff!

  • Oroborous
    Joined:
    My bad

    I didn’t look up, but I think I mixed up the Pranksters trip.
    Thanks for correcting and straightening out the ole synapses lol
    Now that you mention about/for the millennium etc…and not in 90…

    And also, now that mention, Brent’s passing probably would have added to the energy factor. We were at the first shows in Richfield with Vince after Brent’s much too early demise, and there most definitely was a lot of extra energy.
    A lot of what now and uncertainty and ?
    Will it suck? Will it be good? Things had been steadily improving the last couple years before so there was a lot of anxiety or uncertainty.
    But man, once they started playing all that energy morphed into that big ole ball of “1” that everyone in the building became, and as the night progressed it was like you could feel 18K people all exhale in relief all at the same time, as we all realized that, “yeah, this is going to be different, but it’s gonna be alright” we will survive, we will get by!
    So I’m sure that must have been a variable too.

    Back to the bad actors thought. Again, I’m struggling to not be so ?
    I feel I’ve painted an overemphasis or oversaturated picture of people?
    Let’s think of it this way, it’s like BITD when grownups used to say “one bad apple spoils the barrel” meaning, most certainly most of the folks at shows were like the good apples, but now there were more and more bad ones getting into the barrel. And though there weren’t so many relatively, the bad ones were now a whole new kind of bad that spread the rot more prominently. ?
    Hopefully that makes better sense?

    Edit: Or lol
    What BC just said ; )

    And perhaps the biggest factor was just sheer size like BC said.
    No matter what kind of head, there just were now too many for the scene to function healthy…

  • bluecrow
    Joined:
    Scene in the NW

    I saw almost all my 90s shows in the Pacific NW. Eugene 90, 93 and 94, Seattle 94 and 95, Portland 95. I think the scene was overall a lot healthier but the 94 Eugene shows still attracted enough fools clowns and jerks to kill the Dead's return there the next year which is why they ended up at a lame Portland race track in '95. By the third show in Eugene 94 (a huge show) it was clear that they wouldn't be allowed to return. The camp zone in the parking lot was a freaking trash dump (I was lucky enough to be staying on a "peacock farm" outside of town). Stories of messed up and disrespectful behavior throughout the town - and the locals being rightfully angered by that - were already circulating. By chance I was visiting family in the Midwest early July 95 and saw the last 2 shows in Soldier Field (brother had extra tickets he bought for friend who then changed his mind.) Wasn't there for the scene so didn't spend much time in the lot but do remember a young woman describing all the weird stuff that had gone down earlier on that summer tour and it was clear she was spooked by the vibe. The 12/89 shows at LA Forum (my only SoCal shows) were the only time I was offered "chiva" - what's that I had to ask and it was H - by a non-scene, just dealing, guy out in the lot. Politely turned down that offer.

  • proudfoot
    Joined:
    Spiral Light

    I saw that written about in Golden Road fanzine

    Paul Bodenham was publisher

    The Ticketless Hordes was my name for the cling-ons

    My final 3 attended GD shows were fine in my opinion 5/24, 25, 26/95. No problems, perfectly acceptable shows. Then came the Tour From Hell after Shoreline. Oy.

  • daverock
    Joined:
    1990

    Oro-yes, what you say is consistent with how I saw things at the time - and how I see things now. I didn't know anyone into the band at that time, but excitement was generated by the "Spiral Light" fanzine that came out every two months or so. So I was aware of the recent return of Dark Star, and also of the increased popularity of the band in the U.S, following Touch of Grey. This was tempered by Brent's sad demise during summer 1990 - so there was also a sense of not quite knowing how this would affect the band. I can remember thinking that Tom Constanten would probably rejoin - which shows how much I knew !

    I wasn't aware of the Merry Pranksters coming to Britain in 1990 - although they did come in the year 2000 for the millenium celebrations. Both Ken Kesey and Ken Babbs were part of this, and they put on a show at The Barbican in London - showing footage of the bus trip from 1964.... interspersed with comedy sketches!

    Back to the Dead - I was amazed at how many Americans had travelled over for those shows. They seemed to make up most of the crowd. I saw Santana at Wembley in 1991, and I wondered if a similar scene would follow them over. It did not. No other American band I saw - I saw live shows from 1972-2019 - had anything like the same following The Dead did, that travelled over here to see them.

  • Oroborous
    Joined:
    Set and setting

    Yeah, that’s what I’m trying to articulate.
    That the environment that we and the band were now forced to live in was perhaps the biggest factor in the diminishing returns etc.
    I don’t think they liked it any more than we did, but what were they going to do, other take a break like they should have…
    And of course that environment was created to attempt to deal with the over extended masses. And yeah, overall the people weren’t generally as bad as I may portray, but bad actors and behavior were increasingly evident, and often more heinous, and especially in specific places or types of places etc.

    Daverock, Im guessing in your unusual situation:
    1- yes, probably not your usual run of the mill DHs like some of us here.
    Fanatics with the ways and means perhaps. Ya know, the more invested in something, the more folks will get worked up. For some perhaps combined into a lifetime European vacation.
    I know DL saw some of those 90 shows, as I think he was studying there? I forget…
    2- extra hype and excitement as they hadn’t been to Europe recently
    3- I believe Kesey and co were there and even brought Futhur 2
    4- the return of DS, Attics etc inserted a huge hit of adrenaline to the scene in general, so guessing over there also.
    5- the popularity explosion via TOG/ITD must have had an effect over there too
    6- concerts and crowds in general had changed by then
    7- perspective: you weren’t that experienced in live GD madness etc (that’s not a criticism! I mean how would you be…) and the saying “there is nothing like a GD concert” worked on many levels. So unlike us, who almost took for granted usually hitting as many shows as we reasonably could on spring, summer, and fall tours (say between 5-15 a year average) it must have been a very unusual and eye opening experience, especially compared to 81!

    But of course as first show says, much of this is perspective dependent fo sho!
    Like many of our more aaa “mature” heads here, they got turned off in the 80s because of the environment changes etc.
    if your normal perspective was the Fillmore, even a small hockey rink might become unenjoyable, especially with reserved seating and so many people, comparatively.But If all you’ve ever known is Giants stadium, and never freaked freely in Maine, or Cali, Hampton, or any of the many sweet, smaller, outta the way places they used to be able to play, well your perspective might not think things so bad?
    To me no more GA was the biggest negative factor that effected our show enjoyment. Sure a stadium is never gonna give you the same vibe, but if you were able to hang out where you wanted, which as sound freaks was usually the SB, it made a big positive difference.

    So the slow but steady population growth, later exasperated by the tsunami after 87, which also attracted too many civilian non heads just about for the bollocks, which led to having to play big crappy venues in crappy places, and no wonder folks used to a completely different experience in every way, gave up…

  • daverock
    Joined:
    Sense of place

    Another factor in crowd behaviour may be related to where the show took place. The shows I saw were in London, so U.S. Deadheads had to travel some considerable distance to be there. This must have made it impossible for many who followed the band to attend. I have never read a message on the board from anyone in the U.S. who went to Wembley in 1990. What distinguished those who travelled from those who didn't ? Lack of responsibilities? More money? Youth...
    I don't know if this relevant, but young Brits abroad used to have a terrible reputation for behaving less responsibly abroad than they did at home, simply because they were on holiday. They were renowned for over doing it in Amsterdam in the 90's where some of them flocked for the ready availability of dope. A few hours after arriving, many of them would be incapacitated!

    So...in a nutshell, the shows I saw cannot be regarded as typical simply because they took place in England.

  • mkav
    Joined:
    ORO

    I saw the GD and offshoots when I could from 1975 until, well, today. I was never what you'd call "hardcore" in that I never went on the road, but was, and am, a very avid fan. I guess I'm a little clueless since, other than the sheer size of the crowd and therefore venues, I never really noticed the deterioration in the "quality" of the fanbase that I've read so much about.
    Well, until 1995. I was in Maryland Heights, Mo. for the show after the Noblesville fiasco. The fans in the lot were pissed. The band was pissed based on the letter they circulated, nd their general demeanor.
    The 7/6/95 show was lackluster (great setlist, though)...partly due to Jerry's health, but I'm also sure due to the band's state of mind.
    I appreciate the perspective of those were more intimately involved with the entire scene than I was, over time. Thanks for posting.

  • 1stshow70878
    Joined:
    Oro

    Nice essay Pedro!
    It is about perspective I suppose.
    I had so few shows compared to everyone here but that timeline felt the same. Luckily I had nice venues so the ugliness just wasn't that noticeable. That said I knew I was done after my '94 show and even had the weird feeling that either Jerry or I wouldn't be around much longer. Somehow I'm still here, lol.
    Cheers

  • Oroborous
    Joined:
    Like sands through the hourglass…

    Saw a few shows between Jan 79 and at the last one, 29 years ago tonight!
    Not sure I remember as much free stuff early on, more so over the years for sure.
    Same with the folks that Daverock described.
    Basically no hangers early on, but by the end the ratio was phuched, with too many posers and way too many people who came just to party, (or worse, bye/sell bad drugs,) wether for only Shakedown street or the show itself.
    All I can say is I’m glad there were no phones yet…these folks were clueless enough! And I try not to be prejudiced, but I will always unfortunately have an aversion to extremely unwashed dudes wearing nothing but a skirt…

    And I’m not singling out touchers either, as there were always plenty of nice new young people coming along who were really into the music and wanted to learn the ways and means from us veteran heads etc,
    No, these folks I speak of were not heads!
    I have younger cousins who came up then who saw hundreds of shows and ended up working in and around the organization that are nothing like the clueless hordes that overtook us.
    Unfortunately, the sudden popularity brought a literal explosion of too many and the wrong kind, to an all ready fragile environment that could in no way sustain itself. It saddens me all these years later to think back to it while it was happening, experientially. The thing you loved more than anything, slowly dying right in front of you and not much you could do.

    You could feel it building slowly through the eighties, probably similar to how my “generation” of heads noticeably grew and thus felt to originals during the late seventies success, but it hadn’t gotten too bad yet.
    85 was perhaps the peak of how big it could get and still be fun etc.
    And boy was it fun ; )
    I don’t recall it in 90 as much as Daverock describes—probably perspective, and after 87 which became so unbearable I skipped fall tour (that and the venues they now played because of the population explosion)—so maybe after 87, we were just desensitized and 90 didn’t seem so bad? I’m also positive the venues I was at in 90 helped a little.
    But then you could still have some choices…
    Luckily, I recall things did settle back somewhat, though never like when I started, or before I’m sure, and by the end it seemed completely ruined.
    Too many people, most of whom didn’t know or give too shits for us, our culture, our host places, (or even the music )we so lovingly tried to keep alive all those years.
    Popularity, this kiss of death, like that Eagles song, the last resort “call something paradise and kiss it goodbye”

    All these years later I’ve had a long time to reflect on it, and get better acquainted with the music of later era (91-95) shows. What I’ve found is, it wasn’t so much the music that turned me off near the end, it was the set and setting etc. I grumbled then because I wasn’t seeing what I wanted to see, but that doesn’t mean it’s bad. Just perspective…
    No, I now think where and how I experienced the Dead then had much more to do with my dwindling enthusiasm at the end.

    And I’m not talking about being electric, I mean in any psychoactive state or not, having to go to big, expensive cities with all they are, instead of kind small and/or awesome outta the way places like Maine, Roanoke, the Rocks or all the sweet little places: Greek, Frost etc Even Hampton BITD…
    Yeah, big, horrible venues in big horrible expensive cities, with uptight cops, overrun by selfish clueless rude wannabes, and worst of all, shitty sound!
    Although the dead’s legendary crew always did a damn fine job with what/where they were forced to work, let’s face it, sitting up on the side of a giant stadium hearing only half of an overly stereo mix if your an Audiofile tech is torture!
    We went to try to experience the MUSIC the best way we could, wether in the front row, or in front of the soundboard. Later, when GA unfortunately was not allowed, or only existent on the floor of huge stadiums, we’d just hope we could find a spot directly back but in the middle to try to get the best stereo sound we could under the circumstances, and hope some non DH regular civilian type concert goer didn’t show up half way through the first set and want “their” seats…
    Yep, I’ve loved the Dead probably more than is healthy lol, but getting in your thirties, and becoming a returning poor college student, having only horrible big crowded places to go to, it’s no wonder I wasn’t able to better grasp and enjoy the new music.
    Now, all these years removed, in the comfort of home etc, most of those negatively influential conditions and their memories are gone or smoothed over as age will do, and I’ve been able to finally get to know and really enjoy much of the later music. Im not suggesting that things weren’t changing musically too, just that I haven’t found things to be as dire as everyone seems to just off hand suggest.I blame that on the internet…
    But Add the setting changes, to the human practice of comparing now to “the glory days” and it’s perhaps too easy to just write it all off as undesirable.
    Im mean even if things hadn’t gotten so outta hand later on, it was never going to be the same for me as the early years in the front row, or say in 85 hanging out at the SB, just like that probably wouldn’t have felt the same to someone who experienced the music and scene ten years prior to me.
    As awesome as say front row Rochester in 1980 was, I’m sure it was nothing like hanging at the Fillmore west etc.
    So comparative experiences and personal change will always be an influential factor, but upon much further review, I’ve found the unfortunate changes popularity fostered a much bigger negative factor than just the music.
    I’ve said before, I’ll say it again, they should have taken another hiatus after Brent died! Or, if not then, after JG had the second health scare in 92.
    Sigh…
    Well, at least it was a Hellava run while it lasted!
    Singing, thank you, for a real good time!

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The bus came by. We got on. That's how it all began. Almost as soon as the Fare Thee Well shows were announced, folks started planning to meet in Chicago. They met. They connected. Things were never the same. And now, further! Or maybe Furthur.
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In reply to by marye

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same here...my son introduced me to JRAD. really enjoying t.

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In reply to by Graceful_Dead

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Hey Graceful Fred,

We'll be in Boulder this year -- if you feel like meeting up, please let me know! What an incredible weekend it was last year. You guys won't be disappointed!

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In reply to by ASL

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Weeeeellllll, ASL,
we have a financial squeeze at present and likely will not travel out there.
We're looking into selling the tix, but maybe someone out there can give me some insight:

There are lots of tickets offered on Stubhub, but it appears that the Folsom box office site also still has many on offer.
Do people just not look at the stadium site first?

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In reply to by Graceful_Dead

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Hi again.

Ugh, sorry to hear you won't be there. I'm not sure if people go to Folsom first or not. I remember last year there were still a lot of tix available leading up to the Boulder shows, but by the time we got to Boulder, people were having a hard time finding...so not really sure how it goes.

Hope you guys are doing well! Happy Summer!

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"Whether you love the Dead or have never listened to them (no one who gives them an honest-to-goodness chance ever ends up disliking them), these two concerts are not to be missed."

from the Chicagoreader in anticipation of 2 nights at Wrigley.

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In reply to by mkav

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For each of the 3 two-night stands so far this summer, the first night has had a song debut;
It Must Have Been the Roses being the latest.

What's left for the rest of the summer? Place your bets:

Attics of my life
Dupree's Diamond Blues
Cosmic Charlie
Born Cross-Eyed
Mason's Children
Me and Bobby McGee
Might as Well
Money Money
Mountains of the Moon
New Potato Caboose
Operator
Rosalie McFall
So Many Roads
The Golden Road (To Unlimited Devotion)
Till the Morning Comes
To Lay Me Down

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In reply to by Graceful_Dead

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is it true D&C have played no Brent songs? I "heard" that recently, but have not researched it. Maybe they'll surprise us!

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In reply to by mkav

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I have not seen any record of Dead Co performing a Brent song.

Two omissions from my list of possibles (besides Brent and Keith-Donna songs):

Alligator
Candyman

This summer's pattern for debuts by Dead Co held over the weekend:
the first night at Wrigley had the first "To Lay Me Down".

But as they come East, there are no more two-night stands on the schedule; the next is the finale in Boulder.

So no more premiers? Inquiring minds want to know

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In reply to by geomeister

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I can't even bear to say it. Another loss, seems more close and mournful.

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In reply to by mkav

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I know it's been a while, but I'm moved to write by last night Nuggs broadcast of the Halloween show from MSG last year.
It started with the Ripple tribute to Hunter, but that was not all:
every song that night was a Hunter song (except the Werewolves encore).
I was at that show but don't think I realized as it was unfolding what the connection was.

It made it more meaningful to listen to again knowing that each song was chosen with Hunter in mind, and appreciating how many lyrics referred to songs: of course,
Let there be songs to fill the air;
Light the song with sense and color;
Sometime the songs we hear are just songs of our own; and of course,
How does this song go?
And Oteil sang his heart out on China Doll; really moving.

And ultimately,

The storyteller makes no choice
soon you will not hear his voice

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where DOES the time go?

Sure glad that was not really the final shows.

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Hello again everybody. Just happened to click this link, and lo and bee-hold, we're still here! How reassuring is that!?! Hope you've been managing to negotiate the pandemic gauntlet okay. All's well here. (Drop of Dew) Pam and I both had light bouts with covid last October, but are back up at full steam.

This time SIX YEARS AGO we were just beginning to reach out to shake each others hands. FTW was still over five months away and the Pic-A-Nic wasn't even a daydream! Tempus sure is fugitting big time! I'll try to stop by more often from now on.

Onward!, (Oat Willie) Jeff

Glad to hear you're both well. I check back in occasionally to see whazzup.
knock on wood...no Covid here.
I was dialing to get a Covid vaccine appointment the past few days and it reminded me of the spinning circle trying to get tix way back then. I was more successful getting FTW tix than Covid vax appointment...first things first!
Stay safe .

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Hey Hey Hey,
Hope you all are well. We scored tix to Dead & Co Dallas on 10/14. Hit me up if you will be there!
Cheers, GOB

can't make it, even though only a mere 4.5 hour drive north. Age is catching up: I'll be recovering from hip replacement surgery at that time.
if the Covid don't getcha, then arthritis will

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Hey now GOB, Mkav and SSDDers,

Man Mkav, bummer about the hip replacement conflict – still, in the big picture its great you're getting that taken care of. All the best. And stream on!!!

GOB: I've got a ticket for Dallas, but starting to have second thoughts about using it. I won't be eligible for the booster until November, and my two Moderna's are apparently staring to wane. Got a few weeks to decide.

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RE: Dos Equis Pavillion, Dallas October 14: I’m driving over on Wednesday. Once back out in civilization, my cellphone will come back to life at 432 249 0032. My seat is Sec 205, Row B, Seat 1.

What finally made the decision for me was when, during a visit to my doctor a couple of weeks ago, I happened to ask what she thought about going to live music. (we had covid last October, and had both Modernas in March). She said as long as I maintained indoor protocols during the trip, I should be okay and responsible. As I was leaving she asked who I was going to see. "D&Co", I answered. "We are too she replied." That cinched it.

Onward

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Greetings Daydreamers,

Just a quick note to say hello and hope you all get to many shows this summer.

Cheers, GOB

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Hey now GOB (and the crickets that seem to have taken up residence here since FTW), Also hope lots of SSDDers get to a show or two this summer. I'll be at the two Folsom concerts. The only other SSDDer I know of going to Boulder is Spascarella. . . Lisa Deadgeek couldn't get away. Neither could James M. or Geomeister. Not sure who'll be driving the bus, but I know WE WILL GET BY! Onward, Oat Jeff

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We had a thunderstorm after midnight last night. Lightning, thunder. I then opened Deadbase 50 and remembered June 17, 1972 was the last time Pigpen performed with the Grateful Dead. Albeit without singing. A major turning point for the band. They were never the same band again. But as with the winds preceding a monsoon storm we also experience the winds of change. Storm over the land (Carl Sandburg) indeed.
Last go round. Thank you Pigpen.

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Meeting up with SSDDer Steve P. for all three at Folsom. Any other Daydreamers going? Can't touch the close-in seats anymore, but you can find $90 tix if you poke around.

Interesting Pigpen tribute from Strider, but I think we're now back to the Sunshine Daydreamers thread (plus lots of crickets).

Onward.

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I went to Dallas show and was disappointed. sigh. The high points were excellent but there was just too much low energy, pointless noodling....very well played but no "zing". It was sort of boring IMO. I left early for the first and only time in seeing GD and related spin-offs since 1975.

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I'm meeting SSDDer Steve P. for the Boulder shows. Anybody else heading to Folsom?

Bummer MKAV, Sorry Dallas was disappointing this year. Couldn't make it this year, but thought the sound at last year's Dallas show was lacking – maybe sound-level restrictions from Fair Park? I talked to others who were in "lawn" and they thought the same thing about the sound. Could that have been part of the problem this year? Still sorry we missed connecting then last year. Onward.

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In reply to by JeffSmith

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Hey Jeff, enjoy the show.
Sound in Dallas was fine, the musicianship was excellent, the crowd was cool, Shakedown St was all good...so all ingredients were in place...the energy was just not there consistently. I've caught 3 or 4 D&C and/or Bob Weir shows, and this one was just ...ehhhh. Videos from other stops seem more energized.

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so great to see this still lives!
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Hey "Crickets". . . Holy shitoly what an amazing 3 days at Folsom. As usual, D&Co took it up a few notches up from under Boulder's Flatirons at Folsom. And there were a full moons, double rainbows, cooling rain sprinkles (well, one intermission replacing "weather delay"). Dave Matthews sat in to end set 2 on the final night. And after Boulder banned 4th of July fireworks, D&Co et al trumped with hundreds of lighted, color-changing drones forming the Earth which morphed into several Stealie variations and more during drums/space, and then returned after the show as bears reminding us to "Please Be Kind" as we left the show and returned to Earth.

The baton now passes to Lisa and Chuck at the upcoming Gorge shows. Hang on.

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Are you still out there? Going to the Sphere?
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In reply to by marye

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Hi Mary
Glad you checked in on us
I keep getting Red X errors about "no HTML"

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I take it there is no html in the post? Send me a PM and tell me what you're seeing so I can alert the tech folks.
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In reply to by marye

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I'm not sure Mary was actually talking to me, but I'll jump in anyway.

I feel like I am going to regret it if I don't go - the Sphere 'n Bob Weir! And yet my heart isn't in it. A large part of that is about my sobriety - Vegas and I have rarely played nicely together on that score, and things feel fragile for me right now. Even though it's months away, I think it's wiser if I do the couch tour again instead. And honestly THAT makes me happy just to think about it, so despite the misgivings about regrets, I feel like it's the right call for me.

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that decision which is "top of mind"

uncle_tripel

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In reply to by uncle_tripel

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Hoping gremlins are banished.

I was intrigued by the U2 sampler from the Sphere during the Grammy's.
But my aversion to Las Vegas will prevail (plus, oh yeah, budget)

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In reply to by Graceful_Dead

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and so happy to see Mkav, Oat Jeff, Geo and GOB!

Oh, the memories!

I have begun working on a book manuscript about Deadheads and have some thought to share about how to classify the newer generation that acts like us but wishes not to be called Deadheads.

Either, they associate that with older people, or they are more generally into "Jam" and not exclusive to the Dead

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wow...that captcha almost made me not logon!

Anyway, I'm going to the Sphere for the 8/9 show. I was not going to due to $, time and I was generally disappointed the last time I saw D&C (Dallas May 23...NO energy in that show)

After watching YouTube videos and seeing the videos, feeling the vibe, well...I just HAD to dance.
Anyone else?

FWIW, I don't like being called a Deadhead. I've been going to Dead and Dead-related shows since 1975. I hope no one is offended by this comment: Deadheads have a connotation with which I do not associate. I love the music, I love the vibe of the shows, I love Shakedown (even before it had a name), I have not met a single person at a Dead show that I have not found interesting. BUT, the connotation of unwashed and unemployed wanderers never appealed to me.

I KNOW the "outside world" perception is greatly exaggerated and overly stereotypical. Again, sorry if I offended anyone.

Maybe this phenomenon can be a chapter? Many of my fellow Grateful Dead fans feel the same way. We're all "older".

Hey MKAV
Thanks for taking the time to share your point of view.

One of my goals in trying to get this published is to counter the stigma of the unwashed drifter.
Not unlike the writer of Acts of the Apostles who seems to have had a goal of convincing the mainstream folks of the Empire that the Jesus followers were not so different from them.

Each chapter of the book includes a common trait of Deadheads (open and engaging; looks for the best in others; relishes hearing new versions of their favorite song) that cannot be proven statistically but is amply demonstrated by getting to know some. And so the working title is "Ask a Deadhead" and encourages the curious to go out to a Shakedown and see if they, like you, don't find many common, and likable, traits in the crowd.

One of the prompts for this was what took place at a Congressional hearing last summer when Fed Chair Powell was asked about attending a DeadCo show; Yes, he happily replied, and related that he has been enjoying the music for 50 years. The curious member of Congress then made the sweeping statement: "I like people who like the Grateful Dead". Which would also be a good book title.

PS Vegas makes me itchy and twitchy; I am content with at home big screen versions posted by generous YouTubers

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14 years 7 months
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new band I heard the other day, nice and spacey.
Tangerine Dream Legend
Alan Parsons Project Tales of Mystery and Imagination
Jade Warrior Last Autumn's Dream
Stomu Yamashta, Steve Winwood and Michael Shrieve Go
There are a lot of good titles left in my record collection.

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In reply to by Graceful_Dead

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I would absolutely love to read this when it's complete.

In a way, I was always jealous of those who could drop everything and go on tour for a summer, year, decade.

I'm not a Vegas fan at all, so I understand not wanting to subject yourself to Las Vegas, but that's where Mohammed is right now.

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In reply to by mkav

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Hey MKAV (or MaryE?)

I’ve got a book proposal ready to send to publishers if you want a preview; send a contact to the Inbox if you desire.

A fuller list of traits that I say are common (but of course not exclusive) to Deadheads:
Open and engaging;
Look for the best in others;
Value new experiences over new possessions;
Can describe (in detail) a life-changing listening experience;
Are optimistic about the future of the GD world (and maybe in general)
There are no mean Deadheads;
No one stops being a Deadhead

They love the Grateful Dead.
It differentiates them from hippies, who have many of the same traits, but aren’t necessarily obsessed with GOGD.
And not all Deadheads look like hippies.
Good luck with the book Graceful.