• August 5, 2010
    https://www.dead.net/features/release-info/our-first-80s-box-complete-1989-hampton-warlocks-shows-6-cds
    Our First ’80s Box: The Complete 1989 Hampton “Warlocks” Shows on 6 CDs!

    It is a measure of the Grateful Dead’s confidence going into their fall 1989 East Coast tour that they decided to travel with the state-of-the-art Le Mobile remote recording truck so they could capture a bunch of their shows on 24-track tape, with an eye towards putting out a live album in the summer of 1990 in conjunction with a European tour that was already in the works. (Indeed the band recorded a number of shows on multi-track through the spring of 1990. The eventual album was Without a Net, released in September 1990.)

    There’s no question that the band had been on fire for quite a while. If you’re familiar with the CD/DVD releases Truckin’ Up to Buffalo from July 4, 1989, Crimson, White & Indigo from July 7 (Philly) and the video-only Downhill From Here from July 19 (Alpine Valley, Wis.) — not to mention the earlier nationwide telecast of the Summer Solstice show from Shoreline Amphitheater (Mountain View, Calif., June 21) — you know the group was playing at an exceptionally high level, arguably getting stronger each tour since Garcia’s remarkable resurrection following his Summer ’86 meltdown/near-death. The band had also been in the studio working on a new album, Built to Last (released Halloween ’89), and that newish material was starting to sharpen up on the road, too.

    When the first few dates of the October ’89 East Coast tour were announced, the Hampton (Virginia) Coliseum, long one of the band’s favorite places (and the site of many a fine Dead show) was not included on the list. You see, there had been some problems outside the last shows the band had played there — too many ticketless folks, too crazy a scene — and the powers-that-be in Hampton weren’t sure they wanted the Dead back at all. This is a problem the Dead encountered a lot during their post “Touch of Grey” renaissance, so the band got creative: Just ten days before the tour was to begin, the Dead suddenly announced a pair of “stealth” shows at Hampton set for October 8 and 9, 1989. There were no mail-order tickets sold for these gigs (as was common in those days); in fact, ducats were only sold in Southern Virginia through local ticket outlets, as a way to keep out the inevitable Dead Head invasion that followed the band everywhere. Instead of “Grateful Dead,” the tickets said “Formerly The Warlocks” on them, and when fans arrived at the gig those nights, the marquee read “The Warlocks.” Non-Deadheads passing the Coliseum must have been very confused seeing a band they’d probably never heard of headlining the arena. That, of course, was the point.

    The folks who were lucky enough to score tickets for the “Warlocks” shows in Hampton were treated to two of the most exciting shows of the year. Because not only was the group playing great, they had also taken the time to rehearse some old favorites they hadn’t tackled in a number of years, including “Dark Star,” the glorious triumvirate of “Help on the Way” > “Slipknot!” > “Franklin’s Tower,” “Death Don’t Have No Mercy” (played just once at Shoreline 11 days earlier), and perhaps most surprising of all, “Attics of My Life” (unplayed since 1972!). Not surprisingly, the crowd greeted these “revivals” with ecstasy bordering on hysteria. Can I get a “Woo-hooooo!”?

    Over the course of the two concerts, the band offered up what was practically a career retrospective, delving into crowd pleasing nuggets ranging from “Playing in the Band” to “Bird Song” to “Uncle John’s Band” to “Eyes of the World” to a spectacular “Morning Dew”; raucous rockers including “I Need a Miracle,” “Good Lovin’” and that incendiary Brent-Phil stomper “Gimme Some Lovin’”; and recent tunes such as “Foolish Heart,” “Victim or the Crime” and “Built to Last,” among many others (“Dear Mr. Fantasy”! “Stuck Inside of Mobile”! Lotsa good stuff, for sure.) You can find the complete set lists here.

    The Formerly The Warlocks box collects every note of the band’s two nights there, spread over six CDs. The concerts were originally recorded by Grateful Dead sound wizard John Cutler in the Le Mobile remote truck, and mixed recently by longtime Grateful Dead-associate and Bob Weir/RatDog studio engineer and front-of-house mixer Mike McGinn. As always, the discs have been mastered to HDCD specifications, so needless to say, it sounds like you’re there, in the best seats in the house.

    As this is the latest in a distinguished line of remarkable complete-run boxes (which includes Fillmore West 1969, and Winterland 1973 and Winterland June 1977), the folks at Rhino have gone above and beyond to design a package that’s (almost) as exciting as the music. This time out, they’ve packaged the CDs in a wooden replica of a cigar box (Virginia being a tobacco state dating back to colonial times), and filled it with all sorts of goodies, from a photo-laden historical essay by your humble narrator, to various pieces of cool memorabilia from the time/shows we won’t spoil for you by describing here.

    All in all, it’s a potent blast of the Dead at their late ’80s best that you won’t want to miss. To order your copy of the Formerly The Warlocks box, click here!

    NOTE: Now available for PRE-ORDER ONLY. Item is estimated to ship on September 7, 2010.

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It is a measure of the Grateful Dead’s confidence going into their fall 1989 East Coast tour that they decided to travel with the state-of-the-art Le Mobile remote recording truck so they could capture a bunch of their shows on 24-track tape, with an eye towards putting out a live album in the summer of 1990 in conjunction with a European tour that was already in the works. (Indeed the band recorded a number of shows on multi-track through the spring of 1990. The eventual album was Without a Net, released in September 1990.)

There’s no question that the band had been on fire for quite a while. If you’re familiar with the CD/DVD releases Truckin’ Up to Buffalo from July 4, 1989, Crimson, White & Indigo from July 7 (Philly) and the video-only Downhill From Here from July 19 (Alpine Valley, Wis.) — not to mention the earlier nationwide telecast of the Summer Solstice show from Shoreline Amphitheater (Mountain View, Calif., June 21) — you know the group was playing at an exceptionally high level, arguably getting stronger each tour since Garcia’s remarkable resurrection following his Summer ’86 meltdown/near-death. The band had also been in the studio working on a new album, Built to Last (released Halloween ’89), and that newish material was starting to sharpen up on the road, too.

When the first few dates of the October ’89 East Coast tour were announced, the Hampton (Virginia) Coliseum, long one of the band’s favorite places (and the site of many a fine Dead show) was not included on the list. You see, there had been some problems outside the last shows the band had played there — too many ticketless folks, too crazy a scene — and the powers-that-be in Hampton weren’t sure they wanted the Dead back at all. This is a problem the Dead encountered a lot during their post “Touch of Grey” renaissance, so the band got creative: Just ten days before the tour was to begin, the Dead suddenly announced a pair of “stealth” shows at Hampton set for October 8 and 9, 1989. There were no mail-order tickets sold for these gigs (as was common in those days); in fact, ducats were only sold in Southern Virginia through local ticket outlets, as a way to keep out the inevitable Dead Head invasion that followed the band everywhere. Instead of “Grateful Dead,” the tickets said “Formerly The Warlocks” on them, and when fans arrived at the gig those nights, the marquee read “The Warlocks.” Non-Deadheads passing the Coliseum must have been very confused seeing a band they’d probably never heard of headlining the arena. That, of course, was the point.

The folks who were lucky enough to score tickets for the “Warlocks” shows in Hampton were treated to two of the most exciting shows of the year. Because not only was the group playing great, they had also taken the time to rehearse some old favorites they hadn’t tackled in a number of years, including “Dark Star,” the glorious triumvirate of “Help on the Way” > “Slipknot!” > “Franklin’s Tower,” “Death Don’t Have No Mercy” (played just once at Shoreline 11 days earlier), and perhaps most surprising of all, “Attics of My Life” (unplayed since 1972!). Not surprisingly, the crowd greeted these “revivals” with ecstasy bordering on hysteria. Can I get a “Woo-hooooo!”?

Over the course of the two concerts, the band offered up what was practically a career retrospective, delving into crowd pleasing nuggets ranging from “Playing in the Band” to “Bird Song” to “Uncle John’s Band” to “Eyes of the World” to a spectacular “Morning Dew”; raucous rockers including “I Need a Miracle,” “Good Lovin’” and that incendiary Brent-Phil stomper “Gimme Some Lovin’”; and recent tunes such as “Foolish Heart,” “Victim or the Crime” and “Built to Last,” among many others (“Dear Mr. Fantasy”! “Stuck Inside of Mobile”! Lotsa good stuff, for sure.) You can find the complete set lists here.

The Formerly The Warlocks box collects every note of the band’s two nights there, spread over six CDs. The concerts were originally recorded by Grateful Dead sound wizard John Cutler in the Le Mobile remote truck, and mixed recently by longtime Grateful Dead-associate and Bob Weir/RatDog studio engineer and front-of-house mixer Mike McGinn. As always, the discs have been mastered to HDCD specifications, so needless to say, it sounds like you’re there, in the best seats in the house.

As this is the latest in a distinguished line of remarkable complete-run boxes (which includes Fillmore West 1969, and Winterland 1973 and Winterland June 1977), the folks at Rhino have gone above and beyond to design a package that’s (almost) as exciting as the music. This time out, they’ve packaged the CDs in a wooden replica of a cigar box (Virginia being a tobacco state dating back to colonial times), and filled it with all sorts of goodies, from a photo-laden historical essay by your humble narrator, to various pieces of cool memorabilia from the time/shows we won’t spoil for you by describing here.

All in all, it’s a potent blast of the Dead at their late ’80s best that you won’t want to miss. To order your copy of the Formerly The Warlocks box, click here!

NOTE: Now available for PRE-ORDER ONLY. Item is estimated to ship on September 7, 2010.

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It is a measure of the Grateful Dead’s confidence going into their fall 1989 East Coast tour that they decided to travel with the state-of-the-art Le Mobile remote recording truck so they could capture a bunch of their shows on 24-track tape, with an eye towards putting out a live album in the summer of 1990 in conjunction with a European tour that was already in the works. (Indeed the band recorded a number of shows on multi-track through the spring of 1990. Then eventual album was Without a Net, released in September 1990.)

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...but what a great idea! They should do a box of ALL their collaborations, like the jams at the ABB NYE show in '73, Watkins Glenn, Dillon Stadium, Fillmore East 2/11/70 and 4/26/'71, etc...
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I always assumed the reason why they never released much in the way of collaborations was due to lack of desire to share revenue and/or logistical issues related to dealing with other record companies, etc. That 6/10/73 jam with Merl (no E!) and the Allmans is classic! And the Dillon Stadium stuff was mighty fine too, as I recall.
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Really blairj? Oh dude, I'm suprised you aren't familiar with this... I'll dig out the issue and post the article....I'll even type the article (partially, it's rather lengthy). This was a significant announcement that fell to the wayside after brother DL passed.... Ok....phew....this is gonna trake me a minute to type. If you are a subscriber to Hittin' The Note, and have issue number 23 on hand, refer to page 24 on the article "Looking Back With Dick Latvala".... Here is a link to the issue.... http://www.hittinthenote.com/cart2/p-130-hittin-the-note-23brdownload-o… Here is an excerpt from the interview..... "HTN: Let's talk about RFK stadium. DL: Alright. For whoever cares, on June 9th and 10th, 1973, at RFK stadium in Washington DC, there was something special that happened. Well, there was another group, Marshal Tucker or somebody like that, who played--I forget--but the AllmansAllmans and the Dead played two shows and they were some phenominal shows. This Occured in the heat of the summer--those who were there know that it was a sweltering one--and for two days both bands kicked some real serious real butt with music. Well, me and my buddy Kirk (Kirk West)here, we want to release that stuff as a joint release. Because both bands played swell, and I think that everybody in the world would recognise what amazing stuff went down when the Allmans and the Dead used to get together and play......"And I'm hoping that before I die that we can get a 4 CD thing out--two of the Allmans and two of the Dead--" This is only a brief excerpt from the first paragraph at the beginning of a lengthy interview of DL that shows all of the powers that be are on board in 1999 when this interview being published. I'd type out the full interview but it would take me a couple of hours but I'm not on the payroll. Your $6 would be better spent ordering the back issue of "Hittin' The Note" #23 (highly recomended) as any Dick Latvala interview is worthwhile reading in it's original context." So, whats the story blairj? If there needs too be a "go between guy" to make Dick Latvala's and Kirk West's wishes come to reality, I'm your guy. All that I ask for is free tickets/backstage passes to a couple of shows, airfare, a meal or two, some beer and room & board for a couple days, nothing major.
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I know I've read an interview with Kirk West that corroborates with the DL interview above about the release of the Dead/Allman box (1999) in the HTN Allman Brother's Fanzine. I'll have to dig it out when I get a chance.
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I don't know what went down. But I also know that when the Dead wanted to put Duane's performances with the Dead from 4/26/71 on the "Ladies and Gentlemen..." FE set a few years ago, there were snags that prevented that from happening; too bad as the "Beat It On Down" was smokin'! Alas, that that was the only show I ever saw Duane... Didn't see the ABB until the year after his death...
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Just got mine in-haven't heard much yet but on the basis of what I've heard so far-they were the Warlocks-the style and sound seems more visceral/elemental to me than, lets say "Nightfall of Diamonds.' Anyone else hear a difference?
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To the veterans who complain about 1989 shows and releases of their ilk... go use the internet and download a bunch of 1960's stuff and kick back. There is lots of stuff out there. 1989 was a great year. End of story. I myself have wrestled with spending 60+ on this release because of the recent SBD upgrades available on many a site. However this is 24-track and its remastered so I will probably pony up and give it a go. I mean that's what 10 subway sandwiches ... its nothing when you think about how good the music is. On a side note this site is great to listen to old skool free loaders who complain about the cost of purchasing music. I mean it never fails... I come here after every new release and its the same guys grumbling ... CD pricing is exactly the same as it has always been. 6 disks for 60 plus tax... If it bothers you ... go download the show on lossless legs or wherever.... just complain somewhere else .. you guys are real downers
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I saw the bulk of my shows from 86-90; in retrospect, I was obviously very lucky to get in -and get out- when I did. I drove from PA down to VA to buy tix for these shows, and drove back down a month or so later to attend them. Definitely two of the most fun days I ever had in my entire life. I don;t listen to the GD as much as I used to, and I already have a fairly extensive collection of boots, so I haven't purchased very many official releases. And having been hit pretty hard by the recession, I'm not sure I will be able to afford these any time soon. I'm considering putting this on my Christmas list and hoping my family will take pity on me and buy it for me ;^ ) Question: is it a limited-edition type release? Will it still be around in a few months? Considering the raves about the sound quality, this looks like the one official release I'd really like to have......
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Not a limited edition, no... Say, you the same lovecraft I spar with over in the DNC Furthur conference?
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Out of curiosity (well, just checking prices) I just took a look at Amazon for this set. Four resellers offering the box for $149.99!!! So there's just gotta be a bonus disc lurking there that we don't know about? Heaven help the folks biting on THAT hook...
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On page 1 of comments for the Warlocks release Dilbert said the following: "No bonus disc? Why would I should I purchase this from GD? I'll wait a few months and purchase from another site for $25.00!" I wonder how that 25 dollar search is going?
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I know this is a reply to an older thread, but I distinctly remember GDM selling a copy of the Allman Brothers show from the Fillmore East in Feb of 1970. I think it was released as a limited edition with Dick's Picks 4. What changed? Personally, I have always thought that the Dead's collaborations with other bands were shaky at best, but it would be interesting to see something released with collaborations. Also, weren't the Allman Brothers on the Postcards from the Hanging CD (Train to Cry)? Can't wait for the Hampton Box! I broke down an ordered it last week. Just in time for the fall season. It will be blasting in my house in no time. Get here already!
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... was put out in conjunction with Grateful Dead Records before the Allmans had their own merch operation set up. It's a straight Allmans show; no Dead collaboration. And I don't recall any connection with Dick's Picks, but perhaps there was...
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The only reason I thought it was in conjunction with Dick's Picks is because it had the same red and black cover that the original Dick's Picks had. The one that looked like a tape box. Thanks for all your good work. Now...let's get that '85 Greek released or a '67 or '75 release out. :)
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Don't worry about me allman, there have already been used listings for this on ebay starting at .99. Since you are so interested I'll make sure to let you know how much cheaper I was able to get this for. Thanks for caring!
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Finally got my order of Warlocks and RT 3.4 on Tuesday. I have to say these are super crispy and clear recordings that are spinning in my Phillips system right now. A great upgrade from the very fine matrix I have of these shows. I'm a happy camper. Just a note on the controversy over different eras of the Grateful Dead. One of the resons I love this band is that they kept changing over time. The 1966 GD was hot and raw, lots of experimental stuff laid over standards, 1967 and '68 they settle into the new sound with an additional drummer, add TC to the mix and 1969 and '70 were hot classic Dead. Drop TC, Mickey splits and they become tight, focused on the music. Add Keith and Donna and the sound takes on a whole new dimension new tunes and a willingness to try new directions. Ron goes away but his spirit stays in the band. 1971 thru 1974 is one of my favorite periods. Take a break, Mickey comes back and it's a whole new ball game. 1976 to '78 has some of the best shows out there. Keith and Donna split and Brent steps up to the plate and the sound adds another dimension. Early '80s produce some smoking hot shows with more tunes, great improvisations and brilliant playing. The band fades out somewhat with Jerry's health then springs back like a lion and roars until Brent checked out. Bruce helped out, they added Vince, more tunes and experimenting with the sound but alas the last few years were hit and miss. Sometimes I think it would have been better if Jerry just did his side projects and didn't hit the road as much as he did. Long tours took their toll. Of course all of you know this stuff already, I'm just recounting this to reinforce the idea that there never was just one band called the Grateful Dead. Every night they played they were a different band, sometimes the same people playing but the spirit kept moving around making each show something new and special. Every era was great, even the years that weren't the best. I appreciate the fact that these guys recorded so much of their stuff that we can sit here in 2010 and enjoy all the different things they did. We are so spoiled with all the great releases that have come out over the past few years. I remember being overjoyed to get a 4th or 5th gen partial audience tape on a Maxell 90. Now I get two complete shows mastered on High Def CD from the original 24 track reels!! That's freaking AWESOME. Here's hoping that everyone gets their orders soon and that many more great shows come our way. Thanks for reading my verbose BS. (~);} On the BUS since 12-29-1968, and I'm never getting off. "When I die bury me deep, put two speakers at my feet, pair of ear phones on my head, and always play The Grateful Dead."
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that's me, blair! When the split between the "old" and "new" deadnet sites happened, I grabbed the same handle. Rumors were swirling back then that the "old" site was going away; I figured folks would migrate over here. This site sure looks beautiful, but after twelve-plus years on DNC I'm most comfortable with that format. Despite my love of technology as it pertains to music, I don;t actually use the computer for much else. I don't do facebook or myspace (aside from a music-related page of which I now know you're aware); DNC is really the only online socializing I do. I expect that it will indeed go away at some point. I doubt Hunter will be footing the bill in perpetuity. I've been enormously grateful for the gist of DNC, though, and I hope it lasts a long time. I've made some life-long friends there, and forged some strong musical alliances with other musicians. When I really stop to think about it, it's pretty amazing to have these sites as living legacies of the Grateful Dead community. Looking forward to hearing these discs; I already asked my sister to ask Santa Claus to drop them down my chimney....:^ )
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that's me, blair! When the split between the "old" and "new" deadnet sites happened, I grabbed the same handle. Rumors were swirling back then that the "old" site was going away; I figured folks would migrate over here. This site sure looks beautiful, but after twelve-plus years on DNC I'm most comfortable with that format. Despite my love of technology as it pertains to music, I don;t actually use the computer for much else. I don't do facebook or myspace (aside from a music-related page of which I now know you're aware); DNC is really the only online socializing I do. I expect that it will indeed go away at some point. I doubt Hunter will be footing the bill in perpetuity. I've been enormously grateful for the gist of DNC, though, and I hope it lasts a long time. I've made some life-long friends there, and forged some strong musical alliances with other musicians. When I really stop to think about it, it's pretty amazing to have these sites as living legacies of the Grateful Dead community. Looking forward to hearing these discs; I already asked my sister to ask Santa Claus to drop them down my chimney....:^ )
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that should have read "gift," not "gist"
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Actually, I noticed that you made a comment on the Mickey-Zakir interview we were chatting about earlier over in Furthur... Hope you get the box...
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You mean I commented back when you originally wrote it? That would make sense, as I pretty much devoured everything I could find about that release. That was one I was REALLY excited to hear about, and was even more excited after it was released, as it exceeded all my expectations. Such an amazing work. Now THAT is a release I would love to hear in 5.1. Holy crap that would be awesome. I do a low-rent version of the stuff they do in GDP. I have a looping pedal and I also run Ableton Live on my laptop. I play little bits and pieces on my percussion, gradually looping them, adding effects, etc. The tech side is actually pretty user-friendly at this point (Global Drum was using off-the-rack software and effects processors, as you know). What I lack, of course, is the virtuosity of a Zakir Hussain or Giovanni Hidalgo or Sikiru Adepoju, as well as the limitless imagination, drive, and, well, recording budget of Mickey Hart. I'm a decent player, and I can come up with some interesting stuff, but I can't come close to playing like those cats. I've studied the congas for years (including the use of several of Giovanni's instructional DVDs), but I'm adequate at best. And as far as the tabla drums go, well, that's a whole sonic universe I haven't even begun to explore. I met a tabla player when I was working part-time at Guitar Center, and I kept his phone number just in case I even get motivated to perform again. I'm thinking about starting a Global Drum Project cover band ;^ )
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Got home form my travels to find this waiting for me. I am really enjoying it a lot..the long and painful process of learning to like '89 is almost complete I would say. Lovely sound too. Not too bothered with all the bits in the box, but I thought Blair's essay was his best yet, and defintely worth rereading a few times (before the all the silly perforated sections detach themselves! ) thanks to all concerned.
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Re: cosmicbadger-I agree this set is the best 1989 release in my opinion. I am enjoying it more than the other shows released-i liked the philly release a lot( buffalo only so-so to me) but this is really great. great blair notes, i agree. Unlike some i didn't hear this before on Archive so this was real unexpected treat. The Warlocks-INDEED.
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I just received this set today, and I was surprised how fast it got to me. I got really excited upon opening the shipping box and seeing the packaging for real! WOW! So I open up the box, break the little wrapper and dig inside. Lots of little goodies and nostalgia in there, I won't spoil it. It's a little trip down memory lane. Upon putting the discs in, with the first notes of Foolish Heart, I got cold chills up and down my arms. Then Jerry started singing, I almost wanna cry, I love late era Dead so much and Jerry aged into his voice so well. I got so excited, that I had to post to the site right away. This is quite possible the best sounding vault release ever! Fellow Dead Heads, young and old, do yourself a major favor and pony up the money for this set. I was skeptical at first, but I am so glad that I splurged. It is amazing! Well, they just started Walkin Blues. Gotta run and boogie!
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I ordered my copy on September 8th, to ship to the UK, and it is still not shipped. Why so long?
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send me a pm with the details and I'll see what's what.
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While I agree, $70.00 bucks is a small fortune to pay for 2 shows and no bonus disc, props to them for releasing these two sick shows. Moving forward though, we need you folks to find a way to release excellent shows with bonus disc at a resonable price. I am a capatalist and understand that the cool box sets draw the fringe fans, but can't we meet in the middle? You guys will make more money that way and we will keep more money in our pockets. I totally dig releasing full runs as a box set and dig it, but when your just releasing two shows have mercy on my wallet!...even though I did buy them.
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Spincds.com in U.K. has announced a Nov.15 release of the NYE 87/88 show as a 2 DVD set.Is this an official release, I wonder, or just another bootleg? The price will be £15.99 which translates to roughly the same amount in USD - ridiculously cheap for 2 DVDs in this day and age. The title has - inexplicably - been changed from 'Ticket to New Year's' to 'Broadcasting Live', which would also seem to indicate that it's a boot. Any comments from TPTB? Blair?
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A quick search reveals some pictures of the box, which looks pretty bootleggy to me. Plus, one site had "1978-1979" on the same box, which reeks of bootleggery even more (selling new for $6!). I'd stick to your official Ticket to New Years.
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I can't imagine why they're letting the DVD catalog decay like that, unless they are planning to re-issue the whole thing on blu-ray. Dream on......
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Very much the starting place of these fine souls recurring again on their way into the 90's... The return of Dark Star was overwhelmingly anticipated during a '87-'88 sub-culture renaissance. The band playing that far out of their archive stoked the fire, and a new generation of Head's jumped ship to get on board. All the kids danced there bones and the 90' set unprecedented sell-out show's.Sit down, if it pleases you, and sip on the sweet taste of success.
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Ok, I don't know if anyone is listening but how about a box set with the '87 NYE run + a DVD reissue of NYE? IIRC, this run was pretty solid. I haven't listened to them in quite a while though. I will concede that I may be somewhat biased because this was my first CA visit and only NYE.
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I think NYE 1969 Boston Tea Party Shows would be a nice box set, if the masters are good enough.
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Sorry to be off-topic (again), but don't you think it would be appropriate with just a LITTLE blurb in celebration of Bobby's 63. birthday? Happy birthday, mr. Weir!
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This is a great release! Please keep them comming " From any year!" Dick would be proud!! The pics, the reviews, everything about these box sets are fantastic!!
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Thanks dead.net. My wife listened to me and totally surprised me for Christmas.It's expensive but the sound is incredible. Keep them coming for us .. I don't mind spending the money for great sound! Joe B
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someone else been taking control of the site or what is happening? Micke Östlund, Växjö, Sweden ------------------------------ My record collection: jazzmicke
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...all the canned spam here lately. 'Tis my guess. I'm still befuddled by the type of spam though. Anyone seen it? It all looks vaguely the same. Like there's a template being followed or something. What is the aim? You do your best, marye. Keep up the yeoman's work.
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12 years 6 months
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spam comes from a template. believe me, it's not a bunch of medieval monks sitting there illuminating manuscripts by hand...it's a bunch of computers belching the stuff out at the rate of bazillions per second in hopes that some of it gets through. Apparently there are enough innocents in the world who click on the links that this is a cost-effective approach and it keeps happening. Sigh. Why they think we're so interested in prom dresses I cannot say however.
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10 years 11 months
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My first shows were The Oxford Plains Speedway shows in 1988 with Littlefeat opening both shows.....And in my opinion,They would make an EXCELLENT box set...The band played well,& they were OBVIOUSLY in good moods proven by the non-stop grinning of Jerry and the RARE banter with the audience after the inevitable WE WANT PHIL chant....I know I have a bias opinion because I have a SERIOUS emotional attachment to these shows..(They actually changed my life forever) But I think most heads would agree with me that these shows were KILLER. I know at least 20 people that would order one IMMEDIATELY.....Thanks for your time and take care.Peace,George (/);}
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    GratefulTwinz
    7 years 5 months ago
    DEADFEAT 7/2/88 7/3/88
    My first shows were The Oxford Plains Speedway shows in 1988 with Littlefeat opening both shows.....And in my opinion,They would make an EXCELLENT box set...The band played well,& they were OBVIOUSLY in good moods proven by the non-stop grinning of Jerry and the RARE banter with the audience after the inevitable WE WANT PHIL chant....I know I have a bias opinion because I have a SERIOUS emotional attachment to these shows..(They actually changed my life forever) But I think most heads would agree with me that these shows were KILLER. I know at least 20 people that would order one IMMEDIATELY.....Thanks for your time and take care.Peace,George (/);}
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    David Le
    7 years 9 months ago
    This is a problem the Dead
    This is a problem the Dead encounter a lot during cheap south pacific tickets their post “Touch of Grey” new start, so the band got creative cheap sesame street live elmos super heroes tickets Just ten days earlier than the tour was to begin.
  • marye
    8 years 7 months ago
    almost by definition
    spam comes from a template. believe me, it's not a bunch of medieval monks sitting there illuminating manuscripts by hand...it's a bunch of computers belching the stuff out at the rate of bazillions per second in hopes that some of it gets through. Apparently there are enough innocents in the world who click on the links that this is a cost-effective approach and it keeps happening. Sigh. Why they think we're so interested in prom dresses I cannot say however.