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  • August 17, 2018 - 11:44am
    marye
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    May 26, 2007
    Shinyribs, Brokedown Palace
  • October 3, 2017 - 1:12am
    martin.george
    Joined:
    October 3, 2017
    A movie from the Sundance
    A movie from the Sundance Channel about an Irish cop named Sgt. Boyle. The opening scene is really good with a bunch of kids partying in a car going down a country road passing around a bottle of whisky.
  • July 28, 2017 - 7:35am
    Randall Lard
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    July 30, 2012
    Inuto Imago
    Inuto Imago Setouchi Triennale 2016 Inujima Performing Arts Program Kazuhisa Uchihashi Inujima Sound Project “Inuto Imago” Improvise music and musical workshop program held in Inujima Island Japan August 22 (Mon) - September 4 (Sun), 2016 Artists: Kazuhisa Uchihashi (JP) Rully Shabara (ID) Wukir Suryadi (ID) Iman Jimbot (ID) Featuring Artists : Samm Bennett (US/JP) Isabelle Duthoit (FR) Masaharu Sato (JP) Mikagami Koichi (JP) Hannoda Taku (JP) Yumiko Tanaka (JP) Concept: Kazuhisa Uchihashi Film by Gigi Priadji Produce & Production Management: Akane Nakamura Yoko Kawasaki (SAYATEI) Mihoka Kawamura Hikaru Tsuchiya Megumi Mizuno http://gigipriadji.net
  • June 8, 2017 - 5:41pm
    mkav
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    June 30, 2007
    LST
    I liked it. I watched all episodes in one sitting, so some of the details are blurry.Overall, I agree that Parrish got too much air time, even if everything he said was straight up true. (Side note...watch Wayne's World 2, the expert they bring on to help get Waynestock going seems to be modeled after Parrish). I don't think I necessarily learned anything startling or new, because I've read some of the books and articles, and was there for a tiny part of the scene, but I think the overall project was done and presented well. Hearing Jerry's own words and voice about the impact of his dad's death was compelling. I have read (Bill's book for one) and now have seen/heard about the quantity and frequency of drugs ingested, and wonder how they functioned at all. I'm sure some would say that is how they managed to function in their own particular way. My only (small) disappointment was their using the Winterland footage from the Grateful Dead Movie as if was a news feel or personal movie or something. Maybe they figured we all I knew it, so why even comment? Anyway, I give it 2 thumbs up, as someone used to say. I'll watch it again at some point, because I did watch it all in one night, so I'm sure I missed details.
  • June 8, 2017 - 10:30am
    dwlemen
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    LST
    I'm still digesting it. I really liked parts, and I was "glad" they didn't gloss over Jerry's struggles with stardom and drugs at the end. As well as how their finally reaching fame sort of was their undoing. I was disappointed at the screen time Parish got. Having read his book, I was already somewhat jaded against his version of their history. He kind of tries to glorify the transition to hard drugs and rationalizes his enabling of Jerry's heroin addiction. I suppose I would have preferred more content like Trixie or Barbara, who gave heartfelt interviews behind the scenes. Parish seemed more to glamorize the wrong things. As for the cinematography and such, I'm not sure. I liked how they weaved songs into the narrative, but the quick stock clips to literally show things said was not my favorite. A specific example is eluding me, but they would have been like, if the speaker said "and we took off like a rocket", we would cut to video of a NASA rocket taking off. Sometimes done, could be quirky, but it seemed like every analogy was done. I did, however, really like how they wove Frankenstein in. That was cool. But all in all, I'm glad it was made and that I got to see it. Peace, -Dave
  • June 8, 2017 - 10:02am
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    Dave, I liked it a lot. It wasn't comprehensive but it was real. Like a Shakespeare tragedy with a kickass soundtrack. What did you think?
  • June 8, 2017 - 8:44am
    dwlemen
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    Long Strange Trip
    Just finished watching the new documentary last night. Was curious what everyone else's thoughts were on it? Peace, -Dave
  • May 8, 2017 - 8:31am
    Randall Lard
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    July 30, 2012
    Hubert Selby Jr: It/ll Be Better Tomorrow
    Hubert Selby Jr: It/ll Be Better Tomorrow Directed by Michael W. Dean, Kenneth Shiffrin Edited by Ryan Brown Producers: Michael W. Dean, Ryan Brown Executive Producers: Suzanne Selby, Kenneth Shiffrin Narrated by Robert Downey, Jr. Narration written by Michael W. Dean Featuring: Hubert Selby Jr. & Alexis Arquette, Amiri Baraka, Anthony Di Novi, Arthur Boyars, Carmine "Tony" DeFeo, Darren Aronofsky, Desmond Nakano, Ellen Burstyn, Gilbert Sorrentino, Henry Rollins, James R. Giles, James Ragan, James Remar, Jared Leto, Jem Cohen, Jerry Stahl, John Calder, Kaytie Lee, Kenneth Shiffrin, Lou Reed, Luke Davies, Matt Polish, Michael Lally, Michael Silverblatt, Nick Tosches, Nicolas Winding Refn, Richard Price, Susan Anton, Susan Compo, Uli Edel
  • April 26, 2017 - 7:42am
    Randall Lard
    Joined:
    July 30, 2012
    Rising Tones Cross
    Rising Tones Cross Direction, Camera: Ebba Jahn Editing: Jeanette Menzel Sound: Jost Gebers, Karola Michalic Ritter, Renate Sami 2nd Camera: Brian Denitz Featuring: Charles Gayle, William Parker, Patricia Nicholson, Peter Kowald Quartet, Peter Kowald Trio, John Zorn Duo, Billy Bang's Forbidden Planet, William Parker & Patricia Nicholson Ensemble, Charles Tyler Quintet, Don Cherry & The Sound Unity Festival Orchestra, Jemeel Moondoc Sextet, Iréne Schweizer Duo, Peter Brötzmann Ensemble The early 1980s were a period of transition for the avant-garde in New York. The loft scene - the days in which Ornette Coleman's home on Prince Street and Sam River's Studio Rivbea provided workshops for experimenters to develop their art - was drawing to a close, and the arrival of the Knitting Factory and it's explosive impact on the Downtown scene was still a few years away. It fell to the artists themselves to create new opportunities. As chronicled in Ebba Jahn's 1984 documentary, Rising Tones Cross, two such motivated visionaries were bassist William Parker and dancer Patricia Nicholson. The film centers around the Sound Unity Festival, a precursor to the couples' current Lower East Side bash, the Vision Festival. This film is a documentary composition of new jazz, New York as the city that generates it, and the musicians playing it. The thoughts of the saxophonist Charles Gayle and the bass players William Parker and Peter Kowald from Germany accompany the film.
  • April 25, 2017 - 7:51am
    Randall Lard
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    July 30, 2012
    Freedom Riders
    Freedom Riders Directed by Stanley Nelson Producer: Laurens Grant Editors: Lewis Erskine, Aljernon Tunsil In 1961, during the first year of John F. Kennedy’s presidency, more than four hundred Americans participated in a bold and dangerous experiment designed to awaken the conscience of a complacent nation. These self-proclaimed “Freedom Riders” challenged the mores of a racially segregated society by performing a disarmingly simple act. Traveling together in small interracial groups, they sat where they pleased on buses and trains and demanded unrestricted access to terminal restaurants and waiting rooms, even in areas of the Deep South where such behavior was forbidden by law and custom. Their efforts were met with extreme violence and brought international attention to the fight against segregation, exploitation and racism known as the Civil Rights Movement. Freedom Riders chronicles the story behind this courageous group of civil rights activists.
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Let's talk movies!!
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As promised to marye. Is a comedy, starring Kevin Klein, Matt Dillon, Joan Cusak, and Tom Sellick. Kevin Klein is a schoolteacher, who is engaged to Joan Cusak (who is brilliant in this film, her adventures make me pee my pants). Matt Dillon is a former student who "outs" Kevin Klein at the Oscars. As you can imagine, a whole hooplah ensues (is a small conservative town where everybody knows everybody). There are episodes in this film that made me laugh until I had tears in my eyes. There is a scene of Kevin Klein trying to be macho that is a real comedic gem. And I will say no more than that, in case you decide to see it.
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Anyone see this movie? Anyone? I'm curious and may rent via NetFlix. "All energy flows according to the whims of the Great Magnet. What a fool I was to defy him."
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Just watched this movie for the first time in a really long time. Man is it fueling my mid-life crisis. I can feel the asylum we call society sucking the life right out of me.Trying so hard to fit in where I don't belong....maybe I'll go back to tilting at windmills. At least that is more soul-satisfying. I need to remember that money makes a great tool but a poor master. OK, I've vented....I'll go to bed now. Peace, Richard
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Farley's last flick before his untimely (but not unexpected) death was panned (of course) by the various critics, employed by the fashion police media. Mathew Perry's over acting fit the masterful direction of Christopher Guest and the legendary Hamilton Camp's character role of Pratt was priceless. Camp as well as Farley will be forever and sorrowfully missed, in my home. Call me juvenile in my movie tastes, I like it that way. Oh and richard, I know exactly what you mean about "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest". I can't watch it anymore. Also, I still can't see what Kesey was so upset about when I do watch. I feel it was very well done. "Good God man! I'm not talking about getting blind drunk, just a taste." "Well a taste it shall be!!! How 'bout you get 'cer own bottle!"
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It has been awhile but I think that one thing that Kesey was upset about was that he wasn't even mentioned or thanked when it won an academy award. Another was that the perspective was changed from where in the book it was from the Indian's view and in the movie it was more about the Nicholson character. I liked them both. I was working in a State Mental Hospital as an aide when the movie came out and had seen ECTs and patients like those portrayed so it was very personal for me. Not to mention the whole Kesey/Dead connection. Do I contradict myself? Very well then I contradict myself, (I am large, I contain multitudes.) Walt Whitman-Song of Myself
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Thanks Hal R., Now that you mention your recollections, I also remember him saying (somewhere) that same thing about the point of view of characters and the change that occurred between the book and movie, being a sore subject. Too bad though, nothing's perfect and the movie was a brilliant piece and brave for that period of American culture. I can also see why Kesey would have felt it was important to his own personal focus and theme(s) to stick with the book's version. As for the Academy Award and not being mentioned, it's criminal but standard treatment for those of our society that will not categorically dismiss the benefits of entheogens, as Kesey was implored (and forced by law enforcement, ultimately). I'm not saying that these substances shouldn't be respected, I'm saying that they should be respected. Depending on your personal view of Kesey, one could make a point either way but regardless, what happened next was a horrible loss for our culture, one we are just now coming to grips with as the Orwellian reality unfolds before our very eyes. "Land of the Free, indeed."
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Also, as I recall Kesey wasn't too thrilled at what happened to Sometimes a Great Notion, either. Now personally I found Sometimes a Great Notion unreadable (unlike Cuckoo's Nest) and thought the movie was darn good, though doubtless dumbed down, and in any case so harrowing I'd never watch it again. But in general I think letting Hollywood get its clutches on your work is kind of a deal with the devil.
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marye,Now I need to see that movie again and try to read the damn book, too. Probably not in my own best mental health interests to do either. Maybe now you guys can see why I watch juvenile comedy movies. (Mutters to self, "Where did I put that damn Spaceballs DVD???) Sometimes I live in the country Sometimes I live in the town Sometimes I get a great notion To jump into the river an’ drown -Leadbelly
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I read this book nonstop over a Christmas vacation and was fascinated. Also have friends who say this is one of their favorite books ever. Much of our view is shaped by living in the Northwest, knowing the forest, the stumps, logging communities and families and gypo logging outfits. Do I contradict myself? Very well then I contradict myself, (I am large, I contain multitudes.) Walt Whitman-Song of Myself
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I think it has to do with the Northwest thing a lot. Let's just say I found the constant sogginess at least as oppressive as Kesey probably meant me to, second-generation Californian that I am. On the other hand, it was 30 years ago if it was a day that I tried to read the book, so maybe I should give it another try.
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we are marshall. just saw it the second time.
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Okay Okay, I'm repeating myself. Earlier I answered a question from Gratefulapril in another forum. She'd seen Express, but could not "name that toon"! Anyhoo,It's really great to see Jerry and Janis together so young and HAPPY. Buddy Guy also kicks ass. I read about the movie in Leshs' "Searching for the Sound" And again.... Has anyone one seen the movie "Alice's Restaurant" from 1969? I've got to find it. I will look on Netflix today! I worked at a shop called "Picasso Moon" in VA. Cool stuff, but overpriced. Who could beat listening to The Dead allday, meeting cool people, not to mention the employee discount!
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yes back in 95,it was on possibly pbs or could of been ctv.i came home from work and my ol'man was watching it.Arlo was in it.not sure who produced it and such.they do lpay it on Thanksgiving.only remember cause i had that holiday on.i think you would enjoy it.Arlo was wonderful.and even Dylan new that!!!and mule i saw themseveral years ago in sanfran.i wish i could remember where i was "very loaded at the time"fortinute to be alive now.i truly liked it cause it was a small place.my only time so far.. peace
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Starring Matthew Broderick and Reece Witherspoon; great flick! Tammy Metzler: [her campaign speech] Who cares about this stupid election? We all know it doesn't matter who gets elected president of Carver. Do you really think it's going to change anything around here; make one single person smarter or happier or nicer? The only person it does matter to is the one who gets elected. The same pathetic charade happens every year, and everyone makes the same pathetic promises just so they can put it on their transcripts to get into college. So vote for me, because I don't even want to go to college, and I don't care, and as president I won't do anything. The only promise I will make is that if elected I will immediately dismantle the student government, so that none of us will ever have to sit through one of these stupid assemblies again! [Student body erupts in huge cheers] "Ultimately a hero is a man who would argue with the gods, and so awakens devils to contest his vision." - Norman Mailer
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From the book by the same name. Go see it on the big screen, so you can get the feel of Alaska. The story of a searcher who paid the ultimate price for his search. Good soundtrack too. He goes solo on a kayak down the Colorado River, I found myself yelling “helmet” in the theater when he didn’t have one and entered the rapids and then two people in the film yelled “ helmet”. Ha! If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear to man as it is, infinite. Wiliam Blake
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is that the about the dude that went out on his journey and was found in the old bus?? nothing left to do but smile, smile, smile
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You are right, that is the one I'm writing about. I very rarely go to movies, but this one is very good. The risks we take when young and how we think we are invincible, especially this young man. If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear to man as it is, infinite. Wiliam Blake
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Into the Wild (film) Into the Wild is a 2007 drama based on the 1996 non-fiction book of the same name by Jon Krakauer about the adventures of Christopher McCandless. It was directed by Academy Award winner Sean Penn, who also wrote the screenplay, and stars Emile Hirsch, Vince Vaughn, Jena Malone, Academy Award winner Marcia Gay Harden, Academy Award winner William Hurt and two-time Academy Award nominee Catherine Keener. It was given a limited released on September 21, 2007, and a wide release on October 19 . Plot Into the Wild tells the adventures of Christopher McCandless, a top student at Emory University and an athlete. After graduating, McCandless decides to give his entire $24,000 savings account to OXFAM and burn all the money in his wallet. As he hitchhikes all the way to Alaska to live in the wild, bringing only a .22 caliber rifle, a camera, several boxes of rifle rounds, some camping gear, and a small selection of literature—including a field guide to the region's edible plants, Tana'ina Plantlore. During his adventure, he encounters several unique people that change his life before he faces the dangers of wilderness. If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear to man as it is, infinite. Wiliam Blake
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Shawshank Redemption is my favorite of all time!!
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i just love the way that morgan freeman narrates the movie. his tone is sooo mellow. i could listen to that guy read the phone book. nothing left to do but smile, smile, smile
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last night finally watched the DVD of Hairspray, which had arrived from Netflix a few days back. While it is nothing whatever like the Dead OR the Shawshank Redemption (though I suppose a creative college student stuck for paper topics could come up with something), it was pretty much a treat from beginning to end and I recommend it heartily. And let me just say that John Travolta is a flippin' national treasure. He makes you entirely forget about John Travolta and see Edna Turnblad, which is remarkable in itself. And he's not only a fabulous dancer (in a fat suit yet...) he's an utterly endearing dancer, and I rarely think of those two words together. Academy Awards are very much a product of prevailing industry winds (as my bro the sound engineer who's won four of them says himself), but if he does not get nominated for this role there is even less justice in the world than I thought.
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Hey Marye- I think Travolta is a great actor. I watched " A Love Song For Bobby Long". I thought that it really should have won some awards. It made me tear up a little at the end. The movie is a few years old, but I'd never heard of it until I ran across it. Lovey Dovey, check it out when you have the time. Peace
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Sorry folks, I couldn't leave her there... Some men are Baptists, others Catholics; my father was an Oldsmobile man. In the heat of battle my father wove a tapestry of obscenities that as far as we know is still hanging in space over Lake Michigan. Mother: All right. Now, are you ready to tell me where you heard that word? Ralphie as Adult: [narrating] Now, I had heard that word at least ten times a day from my old man. He worked in profanity the way other artists might work in oils or clay. It was his true medium; a master. But, I chickened out and said the first name that came to mind. Ralphie: Schwartz! Fra-gee-lay. It must be Italian. Over the years I got to be quite a connoisseur of soap. Though my personal preference was for Lux, I found that Palmolive had a nice, piquant after-dinner flavor - heavy, but with a touch of mellow smoothness. Life Buoy, on the other hand... YECCHH! He looks like a deranged Easter Bunny. Adults loved to say things like that but kids knew better. We knew darn well it was always better not to get caught. The old man stood there, quivering with fury, stammering as he tried to come up with a real crusher. All he got out was... Naddafinga! Of course. Santa. The big man. The head honcho. The connection. Ha, my mother had slipped up this time. Actually the Old Man loved it. He had always pictured himself in the pits of the Indianapolis Speedway in the 500. My old man's spare tires were only actually tires in the academic sense. They were round and had once been made of rubber. With as much dignity as he could muster, the Old Man gathered up the sad remains of his shattered Major Award. Later that night, alone in the backyard, he buried it next to the garage. Now I could never be sure, but I thought that I heard the sound of "Taps" being played. Gently.
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I love A Christmas Story too! Grate flick :)
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Slingblade (Love them french fried taters, Mmmmm, Hmmmm) Pulp Fiction 12 Monkeys Wedding Crashers Festival Express Woodstock The Grateful Dead Movie (Thanks Jerry) Eric Clapton Crossroads Guitar Festival (2004 & 2007) That's enough for now. I'm sure I'll be back with some more in the future. Peace - GADEADHEAD
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Just stumbled across this on Craigslist: 1/10: National Lampoon Presents - Electric Apricot: Quest for Festeroo (san rafael) Date: 2007-12-21, 2:46PM PST Electric Apricot: Quest for Festeroo 7:30 p.m. Filmmakers in Person Les Claypool, singer and bassist with the band Primus, makes his directorial debut with this irreverent spoof of the music industry, tracking a fictional jam band called Electric Apricot along their rocky commercial and spiritual journey to achieve the glories of the Grateful Dead and Phish. Claypool plays Electric Apricot’s drummer Lapland, and along with fellow band members Adam Gates, Brian Kehoe and Jonathan Korty, we share the travails of recording the first album and follow them up that yellow-brick road to Festeroo, their ultimate gig. Largely filmed in Marin, the film features cameo appearances by musicians Bob Weir and Mike Gordon, as well as Seth Green and Matt Stone. Rated R for some language and sexual content including references. Producer: Jason McHugh. Executive Producer: Matthew J. Powers. Director Les Claypool. (US 2007) 91 min. Smith Rafael Film Center 1118 Fourth Street San Rafael, CA 94901 415-454-1222 www.caflm.org
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I can't wait to see this film! Thanks, marye! "If the forms of this world die, which is more real, the me that dies or the me that's infinite? Can I trust my habitual mind, or do I need to learn to look beneath those things?"
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From what I can tell, Deadheads are deeply divided on ol' Les, but I'm a fan. I happened to be working the Bammies one year when Primus played; I walked out to the front of the stage at a random moment and my jaw pretty much hit the floor. Mind you I don't claim to understand the dude, but I get a a big kick out of him, and I loved it the time he opened for Phil at the Greek.
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That looks interesting I may have to check it out!! Thanks,Marye :)
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Went to All Good in 2005 and Les was absolutely amazing! I've seen him about 3 or 4 times but whatever version of himself, he was then, was outrageous (I don't remember what he was calling his band at that festival). Even Gabby La La's playing, in that band, was incredible. I just remember her playing sitar like a possessed alien, while Les melted my mind - totally psychedelic! I'm ready for a good movie that is pure ENTERTAINMENT. "If the forms of this world die, which is more real, the me that dies or the me that's infinite? Can I trust my habitual mind, or do I need to learn to look beneath those things?"
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I loved this film. Has anyone else seen it? All music lovers, which means everyone on this site should see it. Here is the intro from Wikipedia. Once is a 2006 Irish musical film written and directed by John Carney. Set in Dublin, this naturalistic drama stars musicians Glen Hansard (of popular Irish rock band The Frames) and Markéta Irglová as fictional struggling musicians. Collaborators prior to making the film, Hansard and/or Irglová composed and performed all but one of the original songs in the movie.[1] The film has received awards[2] and extremely enthusiastic reviews.[3][4] Shot for only $160,000,[5] it was very successful,[6] earning substantial per-screen box office averages in the United States.[7] If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear to man as it is, infinite. William Blake
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I enjoyed escaping into a magical mystery movie that made me laugh and made me cry as the story circled around the other side.
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Heath Ledger died ........... He plays Bob Dylan In 'I'm Not There' 2007 So sad what a grate actor such a loss!
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Saw this one this weekend. I loved it. Uses different actors to portray different parts of Dylan's persona. Would be confusing to someone who wasn't a Dylan fan and know his history. But to me it was fascinating on so many levels. Sad about Ledger, looked like he was going for the art and not the fame and money. If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear to man as it is, infinite. William Blake
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i got out "HURLY-BURLY"with sean penn,clooney and clancy.its a movie about language and how it affects life.and another gem(think its altman who did it)"MY DINER WITH ANDRE".two friends meet each other in a restaurant,after having been together the last time in highschool.nothing happens,only a diner and two guy telling each other what has become of their dreams.more than excellent:-)(-:!!!! peace bothers an sisters
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He was a good friend of Ben Harper as well, and produced one of his videos. Sad day. "If the forms of this world die, which is more real, the me that dies or the me that's infinite? Can I trust my habitual mind, or do I need to learn to look beneath those things?"
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we cant forget one movie, i dont know if anyone mentioned it but- EASYRIDER!!!!!
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Yes, a group in the UK is trying to get a stop-motion Freak Brothers Movie 'Grass Roots' off the ground, financed by means of public offerings of shares under the Government's Enterprise Investment Scheme (EIS). You can watch a pilot and find out about how to invest in this enterprise here. http://www.grassrootsthemovie.com/ It looks great..anyone got any cash to spare?
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I have a few tattered copies of their comix at the house! I think that sound trippy. VD any one ? he he Thanks for the link badger PEACE
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Took the little ones off to the movies on this snowy afternoon. Or they took me...I wanted to go see the new monster movie, Cloverfield but the kids wanted to see Alvin!!!!...then once we were there I remembered I was a huge chipmunk fan back in the old neighborhood as a kid in the sixties. The movie wasn't all that bad. I thought my colorful childhood cartoon memories were going to be destroyed but the story and the actors weren't bad. Dave Seville was cool and Ian Hawke the mean music biz mogul was very good...Jason Lee and David Cross star. I believe Cross is Ginsberg in "I'm Not There" as well which I have not seen yet...Oddly positiioned on the wall of Seville's messy musicians home was a poster of Bob Dylan from "Time Out Of Mind". My 5 year old got a little restless and she took me for a chase through the movie megaplex past video arcades and concession stands and endless entrance doors to the maze of theaters. Suddenly I looked up at the end of a corridor and saw the spooky poster for "I'm Not There"... The big sillouette of Bob (Cate) with a cigarette and the cast list. Heath Ledger's name looked sureal. I noticed that the poster had a small tear in the bottom. "I'm Not There" was not currently playing at the cineplex...We got back into the show at the end as people were leaving. Never knew what thay were singing about the Wich doctor 'til now... I Told The Witch Doctor You Didn't Love Me true! And Then The Witch Doctor He Told Me What To Do! He Said That: Ooh to the eeh the ooh the ahah to the ting to the tang the wallawalla bingbang Ooh to the eeh the ooh the ahah ting tang wallawalla bingbang Ooh to the eeh the ooh the ahah to the ting to the tang the wallawalla bingbang Ooh to the eeh the ooh the ahah ting tang wallawalla bingbang ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ "Flight of the seabirds Scattered like lost words Wheel to the storm and fly" John Perry Barlow ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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I know it's not a movie but I saw a Fraggle Rock dvd in a gas station and had to buy it. I havn't seen that show since the mid eighties probably and it was a trip to say the least. It's a total stoner muppet show full of outrageous adult themes. Seeing it again after twenty years is kind of weird. Jim Henson was brilliant. Anyone ever seen the Dark Crystal? I work with a woman who looks exactly like one of the skitsies!
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I had some friends who were real fans back in the day. I think it was on cable, so I didn't get it.
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I remember the stalagmites & stalacites, I've always dug those. Were there wierd ostrich looking animals in The Dark Crystal?
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If you want any special items you'll have to come back and buy them when they're on sale. off to watch hot shots part duex.
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13 years 2 months
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Yes there were, and gelflings.
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13 years 8 months
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This weekend I watched the movie Tommy Boy with Chris Farley. What a crack up, to bad he passed he was one funny guy!!