Comments

sort by
Recent
Reset
  • August 17, 2018 - 11:44am
    marye
    Joined:
    May 26, 2007
    Shinyribs, Brokedown Palace
  • October 3, 2017 - 1:12am
    martin.george
    Joined:
    October 3, 2017
    A movie from the Sundance
    A movie from the Sundance Channel about an Irish cop named Sgt. Boyle. The opening scene is really good with a bunch of kids partying in a car going down a country road passing around a bottle of whisky.
  • July 28, 2017 - 7:35am
    Randall Lard
    Joined:
    July 30, 2012
    Inuto Imago
    Inuto Imago Setouchi Triennale 2016 Inujima Performing Arts Program Kazuhisa Uchihashi Inujima Sound Project “Inuto Imago” Improvise music and musical workshop program held in Inujima Island Japan August 22 (Mon) - September 4 (Sun), 2016 Artists: Kazuhisa Uchihashi (JP) Rully Shabara (ID) Wukir Suryadi (ID) Iman Jimbot (ID) Featuring Artists : Samm Bennett (US/JP) Isabelle Duthoit (FR) Masaharu Sato (JP) Mikagami Koichi (JP) Hannoda Taku (JP) Yumiko Tanaka (JP) Concept: Kazuhisa Uchihashi Film by Gigi Priadji Produce & Production Management: Akane Nakamura Yoko Kawasaki (SAYATEI) Mihoka Kawamura Hikaru Tsuchiya Megumi Mizuno http://gigipriadji.net
  • June 8, 2017 - 5:41pm
    mkav
    Joined:
    June 30, 2007
    LST
    I liked it. I watched all episodes in one sitting, so some of the details are blurry.Overall, I agree that Parrish got too much air time, even if everything he said was straight up true. (Side note...watch Wayne's World 2, the expert they bring on to help get Waynestock going seems to be modeled after Parrish). I don't think I necessarily learned anything startling or new, because I've read some of the books and articles, and was there for a tiny part of the scene, but I think the overall project was done and presented well. Hearing Jerry's own words and voice about the impact of his dad's death was compelling. I have read (Bill's book for one) and now have seen/heard about the quantity and frequency of drugs ingested, and wonder how they functioned at all. I'm sure some would say that is how they managed to function in their own particular way. My only (small) disappointment was their using the Winterland footage from the Grateful Dead Movie as if was a news feel or personal movie or something. Maybe they figured we all I knew it, so why even comment? Anyway, I give it 2 thumbs up, as someone used to say. I'll watch it again at some point, because I did watch it all in one night, so I'm sure I missed details.
  • June 8, 2017 - 10:30am
    dwlemen
    Joined:
    June 23, 2007
    LST
    I'm still digesting it. I really liked parts, and I was "glad" they didn't gloss over Jerry's struggles with stardom and drugs at the end. As well as how their finally reaching fame sort of was their undoing. I was disappointed at the screen time Parish got. Having read his book, I was already somewhat jaded against his version of their history. He kind of tries to glorify the transition to hard drugs and rationalizes his enabling of Jerry's heroin addiction. I suppose I would have preferred more content like Trixie or Barbara, who gave heartfelt interviews behind the scenes. Parish seemed more to glamorize the wrong things. As for the cinematography and such, I'm not sure. I liked how they weaved songs into the narrative, but the quick stock clips to literally show things said was not my favorite. A specific example is eluding me, but they would have been like, if the speaker said "and we took off like a rocket", we would cut to video of a NASA rocket taking off. Sometimes done, could be quirky, but it seemed like every analogy was done. I did, however, really like how they wove Frankenstein in. That was cool. But all in all, I'm glad it was made and that I got to see it. Peace, -Dave
  • June 8, 2017 - 10:02am
    _
    Default Avatar
    Joined:
    February 21, 2011
    LST
    Dave, I liked it a lot. It wasn't comprehensive but it was real. Like a Shakespeare tragedy with a kickass soundtrack. What did you think?
  • June 8, 2017 - 8:44am
    dwlemen
    Joined:
    June 23, 2007
    Long Strange Trip
    Just finished watching the new documentary last night. Was curious what everyone else's thoughts were on it? Peace, -Dave
  • May 8, 2017 - 8:31am
    Randall Lard
    Joined:
    July 30, 2012
    Hubert Selby Jr: It/ll Be Better Tomorrow
    Hubert Selby Jr: It/ll Be Better Tomorrow Directed by Michael W. Dean, Kenneth Shiffrin Edited by Ryan Brown Producers: Michael W. Dean, Ryan Brown Executive Producers: Suzanne Selby, Kenneth Shiffrin Narrated by Robert Downey, Jr. Narration written by Michael W. Dean Featuring: Hubert Selby Jr. & Alexis Arquette, Amiri Baraka, Anthony Di Novi, Arthur Boyars, Carmine "Tony" DeFeo, Darren Aronofsky, Desmond Nakano, Ellen Burstyn, Gilbert Sorrentino, Henry Rollins, James R. Giles, James Ragan, James Remar, Jared Leto, Jem Cohen, Jerry Stahl, John Calder, Kaytie Lee, Kenneth Shiffrin, Lou Reed, Luke Davies, Matt Polish, Michael Lally, Michael Silverblatt, Nick Tosches, Nicolas Winding Refn, Richard Price, Susan Anton, Susan Compo, Uli Edel
  • April 26, 2017 - 7:42am
    Randall Lard
    Joined:
    July 30, 2012
    Rising Tones Cross
    Rising Tones Cross Direction, Camera: Ebba Jahn Editing: Jeanette Menzel Sound: Jost Gebers, Karola Michalic Ritter, Renate Sami 2nd Camera: Brian Denitz Featuring: Charles Gayle, William Parker, Patricia Nicholson, Peter Kowald Quartet, Peter Kowald Trio, John Zorn Duo, Billy Bang's Forbidden Planet, William Parker & Patricia Nicholson Ensemble, Charles Tyler Quintet, Don Cherry & The Sound Unity Festival Orchestra, Jemeel Moondoc Sextet, Iréne Schweizer Duo, Peter Brötzmann Ensemble The early 1980s were a period of transition for the avant-garde in New York. The loft scene - the days in which Ornette Coleman's home on Prince Street and Sam River's Studio Rivbea provided workshops for experimenters to develop their art - was drawing to a close, and the arrival of the Knitting Factory and it's explosive impact on the Downtown scene was still a few years away. It fell to the artists themselves to create new opportunities. As chronicled in Ebba Jahn's 1984 documentary, Rising Tones Cross, two such motivated visionaries were bassist William Parker and dancer Patricia Nicholson. The film centers around the Sound Unity Festival, a precursor to the couples' current Lower East Side bash, the Vision Festival. This film is a documentary composition of new jazz, New York as the city that generates it, and the musicians playing it. The thoughts of the saxophonist Charles Gayle and the bass players William Parker and Peter Kowald from Germany accompany the film.
  • April 25, 2017 - 7:51am
    Randall Lard
    Joined:
    July 30, 2012
    Freedom Riders
    Freedom Riders Directed by Stanley Nelson Producer: Laurens Grant Editors: Lewis Erskine, Aljernon Tunsil In 1961, during the first year of John F. Kennedy’s presidency, more than four hundred Americans participated in a bold and dangerous experiment designed to awaken the conscience of a complacent nation. These self-proclaimed “Freedom Riders” challenged the mores of a racially segregated society by performing a disarmingly simple act. Traveling together in small interracial groups, they sat where they pleased on buses and trains and demanded unrestricted access to terminal restaurants and waiting rooms, even in areas of the Deep South where such behavior was forbidden by law and custom. Their efforts were met with extreme violence and brought international attention to the fight against segregation, exploitation and racism known as the Civil Rights Movement. Freedom Riders chronicles the story behind this courageous group of civil rights activists.
user picture

Member for

14 years
Forums
Let's talk movies!!
user picture

Member for

13 years 11 months
Permalink

that you were making up a funny little story for us, and is not really true-bout Jerry Springer Opera.Otherwise, am quite shocked about how low people can go.********************************** It's the end of the world as we know it, and I feel fine
user picture

Member for

13 years 3 months
Permalink

I have NEVER seen a forum where it's members can not start their own threads. I hang my hat at all sorts of forums and have never seen anything like it. Two Toms Thumbs Way Down !!!!
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

51 years 5 months
Permalink

It is all true, Lilly. JSTO was a big hit in London, was due to go to Broadway and then the religious zealots scared away the production money. The protesters didn't like the scene where Adam & Eve & Satan teamed up against God. Harvey Keitel played Satan in a one night production at Carnegie Hall. Now, they will produce it in Bosotn and hope that many people protest for the publicity. Anything to sell tickets, I guess. Yikes... the truth is stranger than fiction! All I did was open the Arts section of the Boston Globe.
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

51 years 5 months
Permalink

This movie defined the change of an era. I'm not sure exactly when it came out, some time in the early 90s, I believe. The highly potent message of this movie was that heroin was in, coke was out, just as our favorite "Dark Star" was about to fade from the scene. As well, there were scenes of drug overdose and homosexual rape as well as a recurring theme badly twisted from the bible, righteous words for a black mobster to execute by. Johm Travolta, Bruce Willis, Uma Thurman, Harvey Keitel lit up the big screen for this one. Excellent movie it was, we all could have done without it and the social circumstances it pointed out and/or promoted. --Brother Essau, he's on roller skates again Shadowboxing the apocalypse and wandering the land--
user picture

Member for

12 years 2 months
Permalink

Hey Lamagonzo, I think you're missing something... Jerry Springer the Opera is a SATIRE - a biting and brilliant one at that. Anyone who is repulsed by the Jerry Springer show would love this great piece of writing. He goes to hell! Just so's you don't get carried away! K
user picture

Member for

12 years 5 months
Permalink

Favorite quote from the film -> "People ask me what prison was like. I tell them, 'you'll find out'." Good to know you got shoes to wear when you find the floor.
user picture

Member for

14 years
Permalink

The Distinguished Gentleman available now on youtube for free. if you never seen this Eddie Murphey comedy, it is pretty good.
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

51 years 5 months
Permalink

This movies is a hip primmer on Senate horse trading by big money lobbyist, But it's nice how Eddie Murphy pulls one out for the Girls Of Many Nations
user picture

Member for

14 years
Permalink

"The Fountain" - Hugh Jackman & Rachel Weisz: Pretty cool movie... full of symbolism that provoked thought about the archetypes western culture take lock-stock and barrel (myself included). The biggest problem with this movie was the "real time" scenes that were preposterous. Sort of a "2001: A Space Odyssey" meets the TV show, "House" kind of movie. "The task is, not so much to see what no one has yet seen; but to think what nobody has yet thought, about that which everybody sees." - Erwin Schrödinger
user picture

Member for

14 years
Permalink

Hey marye! I miss being here, thanks to you and all the grate folks that make up this "reality". This web site is a wonderful luxury for our scene. "Solitary Man" - Johny Cash > "I don't know" - Lisa Hannigan > "I Lay Down" - John Lee Hooker/Zucchero "The task is, not so much to see what no one has yet seen; but to think what nobody has yet thought, about that which everybody sees." - Erwin Schrödinger
user picture

Member for

13 years 7 months
Permalink

The Samuel in our brood will be the BIG 4!! next week. For his 16th birthday he's getting a "BAD MOTHER*CKER" wallet in homage to Samul L., his namesake. Not sure if it's very Motherly, butI'll surely get a chuckle over it. I read that Jerry had a distaste for QT's work. Have any of ya'll heard that ?? What I don't get ~ that so many people LOVE( & I can feel the flack coming for saying) is Napoleon Dynamite. Maybe 'cause I've only seen it once, not sure..... PEACE Hey TL ~ Diggin the TWAIN quote :)
user picture

Member for

14 years
Permalink

except a)I remain hugely bummed he passed before he could make Sirens of Titan and b)I have it on good authority he was as weepy as the rest of us, in our various times and spaces, were at the end of E.T.
user picture

Member for

13 years 7 months
Permalink

ive been watching anime recently. miyazaki is so amazing.also, recently discovered the amazingness that is jim jarmusch. and fishing with john. Peace, The Kid
user picture

Member for

14 years
Permalink

Jarmusch; before Tarantino, though certainly well after Kurosawa... Jarmusch entertained us with this cool, multi-layered film, well worth the DVD rental cost. too many cool actors in this film to list. peace.
user picture

Member for

13 years 7 months
Permalink

jim jarmusch is amazing.tom waits is great in his movies. Peace, The Kid
user picture

Member for

13 years 11 months
Permalink

Thanks for reminding me how much I liked this one...forget the rental cost, I need to own it!
user picture

Member for

14 years
Permalink

"Mystery Train" is on top of my list. I had never even heard of this movie but the clip looks awesome and Steve Buscemi is a favorite. "The task is, not so much to see what no one has yet seen; but to think what nobody has yet thought, about that which everybody sees." - Erwin Schrödinger
user picture

Member for

14 years
Permalink

I think my favorite scene was when Joe Strummer, sitting on at the end of the bed in the hotel, looks over his shoulder at the "Velvet Elvis" and he says something like, "Ah Jez, there that guy is again..." Strummer was the only guy in the universe that could deliver that line with the feel it gave me. Kudos! "The task is, not so much to see what no one has yet seen; but to think what nobody has yet thought, about that which everybody sees." - Erwin Schrödinger
user picture

Member for

14 years
Permalink

"Dumb and Dumber" Moon Landing? "The task is, not so much to see what no one has yet seen; but to think what nobody has yet thought, about that which everybody sees." - Erwin Schrödinger
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

13 years 3 months
Permalink

I watched a movie yesterday called "Bottle Shock". It's based on a true story and set in California's Napa Valley in 1976. In one scene a winery owner was yelling at his hippie son saying "Don't you have any ambition in life?" The son replies "Yeah, to see the Dead at the Cow Palace". Get prepared, there's gonna be a party tonight!
user picture

Member for

14 years
Permalink

Anybody seen "Taking Woodstock" yet?
user picture

Member for

13 years 11 months
Permalink

am gonna see it tomorrow, marye! ********************************** Education: that which reveals to the wise, and conceals from the stupid, the vast limits of their knowledge. Mark Twain
user picture

Member for

13 years 11 months
Permalink

Just back from seeing Taking Woodstock, and am still slightly speechless. All caps necessary but I LOVED THIS FILM! Visually, the story, the characters, and especially the cinematography. Watch out for Wilma (Vilma) my FAVE character of all the film. I was not at Woodstock myself, and would be really curious about those opinions who actually were there-but heavy sigh of happiness on my part, and a giant grin!********************************** Education: that which reveals to the wise, and conceals from the stupid, the vast limits of their knowledge. Mark Twain
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

13 years 3 months
Permalink

Watched a film calle "The Wackness" about a teenage marijuana dealer in New York City back in 1994. Though not the main character, Mary-Kate Olsen delivers an Oscar-deserving performance as a 'shroomin hot Deadhead hippie chick. Sir Ben Kingsley does a great job as a wacky psychiatrist too.
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

13 years 3 months
Permalink

It's been out 10 years but if you haven't seen Genghis Blues this Oscar- nominated film is the story of a blind blues musician and his triumphant trek to the forgotten land of Tuva and the mysterious art of Khoomei, or throat singing, a seemingly impossible form of singing that produces multiple vocal tone simultaneously. Paul Pena, who has played with the likes of Bonnie Raitt, T-Bone Walker, John Lee Hooker, Jerry Garcia, Muddy Waters, and BB King travels to Tuva to live among the descendants of Genghis Khan and compete in their triennial Khoomei contest. I loved this documentary, there's a picture of Jerry near the start, I wonder if Sirius has any of those tapes? Amazing story, beautiful film.
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

13 years 3 months
Permalink

I see that Paul used to open for Jerry and Merl at the Keystone. Recorded an album with them called New Train that wasn't released until 2000. He opened for Bobby and Ratdog in 2001, and passed away in 2005 after a long battle with pancreatic cancer.
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

51 years 5 months
Permalink

Michael Moore's film about the origins of the current banking crisis and the movement of American workers to retake the rights previously afforded to them is excellent. It opens with Louis Louie playing as a gang of 5 rob a bank and goes through the life of families being evicted from their homes. The scene with the black sheriff of Wayne County (Detroit) declaring in a news conference that he is suspending all home evictions is poignant, as are Moore's revelations about big corporations buying life insurance policies on it's rank & file employees - it's called dead peasant insurance. Guess what? The corporations don't help out the poor workers survivors. Bob & Phil need to see this movie. It exposes how the biggest campaign contrbutors to Barak Obama were the big banks, Goldman being the #1. I dare anybody to just let go of their preconceptions about Micael Moore and go see this movie. It'll make you mad as hell (and possibly ready to stick up for your rights).
user picture

Member for

13 years 11 months
Permalink

Oh My! I wanna see that one. Have been fascinated by that two tone singing in Mongolian folk music for a couple of years now, ever since a saw a group perform in Paris. Found it one of the most incredible things had seen in a while, and the music was soo peaceful-eastern yet familiar to western ears. One of the musicials told me that the sound of the music is inspired from nature-like horse's hoofbeats on the tundra, blowing wind, etc. Sorry, I digressed, but to see someone else mentioning that double tone singing was a great suprise! Am looking out for that film now! That vid is just...wow! ********************************** Education: that which reveals to the wise, and conceals from the stupid, the vast limits of their knowledge. Mark Twain
user picture

Member for

14 years
Permalink

hey, any news on that garcia movie we were talking about two years ago?? i have been anxiously awaiting this piece of cinema magic. nothing left to do but smile, smile, smile
user picture

Member for

14 years
Permalink

Hey now, Trish!! Garcia film IS in the works! the rights to two bios were legally obtained, (Captain Trips is one) and some may be surprised to learn, the dude Justin Berfield who used to playe Reese in in that schlock TV show Malcolm in the Middle is involved.. Jason Felts is another guy involved with the project, his dad was a deadhead... MAYBE the movie will focus on Garcia's recovery from the diabetic coma, when he had to re-learn the guitar... according to rumours in LaLa land, the film will also include scenes of Garcia in the army and how he met Phil and the other members of the band... about a year ago, a few top notch people got involved to produce this, Eric Eisner among others. Hollywoodland is SLOW!!!! keep patient. I've seen unreleased copies of a treatment for this, should be good! who will play Garcia??? TOP SECET!!! peace.
user picture

Member for

14 years
Permalink

I've been to several concerts with Tibetan monks doing the two tone singing, it is amazing and seems to just get inside you in a very deep place. If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear to man as it is, infinite. William Blake
user picture

Member for

14 years
Permalink

Ok, so I don't watch many movies or watch tv, so I am kind of behind the times. Loved this movie using Beatle's songs. The way it starts out so innocent and too sweet and moves on to the turmoils of the later 60's is right on. And the trip with Dr. Roberts is quite a trip, wow. The guy driving Dr. Roberts bus looks like Kesey, anyone else notice that? If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear to man as it is, infinite. William Blake
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

51 years 5 months
Permalink

The throat singers of Tuva do two tone singing.The Tibetan monks do Tzokay style chanting, which accomplishes three tones.
user picture

Member for

14 years
Permalink

thanks for the info, I had known that, the memory bank gets kind of blurry at times If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear to man as it is, infinite. William Blake
user picture

Member for

14 years
Permalink

yea. across the universe is a great film. saw it a few times and my favorite part is the BEYOND bus with Bono in the role of kesey-esque guy and the driver made me think of neal behind the wheel, but did resemble kesey. Eddie Izzard is a real trip doing the mr kite thing. LOVE IT nothing left to do but smile, smile, smile
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

14 years
Permalink

Get this movie shows San Fran blues legend Paul Penas journey to the land of "Throat singing" And the road goes on forever.... BobbaLee
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

51 years 5 months
Permalink

A classic. Easily the best screen adaption of Hunter S. Thompson's debut of gonzo. You really owe it to yourself to see this movie.. You can stream it for free on fancast.com. In case you're not familiar, Hunter S. Thompson covers a narcotics conference in Las Vegas and then does a story on the Mint 400 race for Playboy. The real quest is for the soft white underbelly of "The American Dream", which is eventually traced, in a drug induced frenzy, to the casino at Circus Circus in 1971. Lots of music from the 60s and 70s, snippets of course.
user picture

Member for

14 years
Permalink

yes!!! one of my alltime favorite movies. johnny depp is the perfect H.S.T. he actually lived in hunter's basement for months to get his mannerisms just right. what a guy. yea great movie lamagonzo. nothing left to do but smile, smile, smile
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

51 years 5 months
Permalink

Whats become of Steven Segal? This movie was near or at his pinnacle as the macho martial arts kick-ass man's man best. This film is notable for the three minute ending where Segal goes on a freaking tear against the oil companies and auto barons of the combustion engine. Goes to the heart of the matter and is something everybody should see. A more definatively righteous statement in a major release you'll NEVER see. ~ It's oil for the rich and babies for the poor. We've got everyone believin' that more is more ~
user picture

Member for

14 years
Permalink

ok, so, maybe just maybe that website is a bit exaggerated... in recent years I seen a pic of Steven, outside a Bangkok tailor shop, with the owner of the shop, supposedly reccomending that that tailor is the best in the world. ( -; peace.
user picture

Member for

13 years 7 months
Permalink

LOVIN F& L & really enjoyed being him for Halloween last year ! All i needed was to consult my Attorney, but alas no one wanted to be him.... PEACE HST Pictures, Images and Photos
user picture
Default Avatar

Member for

51 years 5 months
Permalink

Thanks for the video CC. Hunter Thompson is one of my heroes. Truly a unique guy. His statement in the above clip "The US is the greatest enemy of freedom in the entire world." is pretty bold. But it was statements like that interwoven with fiction that made him highly readable and a very difficult character to portray. He took his life in 2005, a bullet to the head in the face of terminal cancer. He definitely went out the way he lived. It was the end of an era. Jerry and Hunter are comparable in that they did what they liked their entire life. In the end their art suffered but they boldly asserted their right to freedom in going out the way they did
user picture

Member for

14 years
Permalink

lama said:"but they boldly asserted their right to freedom in going out the way they did" pretty big fucking difference between one man with terminal cancer killing hisself and another dieing in his sleep when he went to seek help for a drug addiction. this is Thompson's legacy: HIS words: "Football Season Is Over No More Games. No More Bombs. No More Walking. No More Fun. No More Swimming. 67. That is 17 years past 50. 17 more than I needed or wanted. Boring. I am always bitchy. No Fun — for anybody. 67. You are getting Greedy. Act your old age. Relax — This won't hurt." Hunter Thompson. this, on the other hand, is Garcia's legacy: peace.
user picture

Member for

13 years 7 months
Permalink

always brings a tear to my eye ... beautiful song Love you Jerry!
user picture

Member for

13 years 7 months
Permalink

" Foosball's the Debil " PEACE