• 1,587 replies
    Srinivasan.Mut…
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    What's Inside:
    7 Previously Unreleased Complete Shows On 20 Discs
    Fox Theatre, St. Louis, MO 12/09/71
    Fox Theatre, St. Louis, MO 12/10/71
    Fox Theatre, St. Louis, MO 10/17/72
    Fox Theatre, St. Louis, MO 10/18/72
    Fox Theatre, St. Louis, MO 10/19/72
    Kiel Auditorium, St. Louis, MO 10/29/73
    Kiel Auditorium, St. Louis, MO 10/30/73
    Sourced from tapes recorded by Rex Jackson, Owsley "Bear" Stanley, and Kidd Candelario
    Mastered in HDCD by Jeffrey Norman
    Restoration and Speed Correction by Plangent Processes
     
    Individually Numbered, Limited Edition of 13,000

    Steamboats and BBQ, ice cream cones and Mardi Gras - are you ready to laissez les bons temps rouler with the "gateway" to the Grateful Dead? Meet us, won't you, in St. Louis for seven complete and previously unreleased Dead concerts that capture the heart of the band's affinity for the River City.
     
    LISTEN TO THE RIVER: ST. LOUIS ’71 ’72 ’73 is a 20CD set featuring five shows from the Fox Theatre - December 9 and 10, 1971; October 17-19, 1972; and two from the Kiel Auditorium - October 29 and 30, 1973. 
     
    The seven shows in the collection span slightly less than two years, but they represent some of the best shows the Grateful Dead played during some of its peak tours. The music tells the story of a band evolving, changing from one sound to another seamlessly, precipitated – in large part – by significant personnel changes in the Dead’s lineup.
     
    The two 1971 shows feature the original Grateful Dead lineup plus newcomer Keith Godchaux on piano. This version of the band would hold together for the next six months as the Dead embarked upon its Europe ’72 tour. By the time the Dead returned to the Fox Theatre less than a year later, they were without Pigpen, who’d played his final show with the Dead at the Hollywood Bowl on June 17, 1972. A year after the exceptional Fox 1972 shows, the Dead came back to St. Louis, but played the much larger Kiel Auditorium, touring behind the release of WAKE OF THE FLOOD, which came out just two weeks before.
     
    All told, the band played 60 different songs during these shows highlighted by blazing romps through “Beat It On Down The Line” and “One More Saturday Night” and wistful takes on “Row Jimmy” and “Brokedown Palace” (whose lyrics give the collection its name). Meanwhile, the copious jamming ebbed and flowed like the mighty Mississippi River on multiple voyages through “The Other One” and “Dark Star.” Naturally, the band paid tribute to one of its favorite rock and rollers and one of St. Louis’ biggest stars by playing Chuck Berry songs at every show in the collection, including Pigpen galloping through “Run Rudolph Run.”  
     
    Each show has been restored and speed corrected using Plangent Processes with mastering by Jeffrey Norman. The collection comes in a slipcase with artwork by Liane Plant and features an 84-page hardbound book as well as other Dead surprises. To set the stage for the music, the liner notes provide several essays about the shows, including one by Sam Cutler, the band’s tour manager during that era, and another by Grateful Dead scholar Nicholas G. Meriwether, among others. 
     
    Due October 1st, LISTEN TO THE RIVER: ST. LOUIS ’71 ’72 ’73, is limited to 13,000 individually numbered copies and available exclusively from Dead.net.

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  • daverock
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    And yet

    I've noticed over the last 12 months that I don't tend to play these shows as a part of a unified whole, like I do with ones in other boxes. If I am in the mood for Fall 1971, 1972 or 1973 shows, I seem to listen to those shows in relation to others from the same year, instead of in relation to other shows in this box.
    But each and every shows here is great, however you listen to them.

  • Edhead70
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    agreed!!

    agreed!!

  • Edhead70
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    well had to post again…

    well had to post again.. this box set is worth the money. compared to the 73 box set just released this one is better. yeah 73 has some really hot shows that we all know of and have been listening to for decades, but the st louis box set is for the heads. eclectic, lots of variety, gusto and every show is different. Not to be missed!!

  • daverock
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    edhead 70

    I agree. Considering the peaks the band scale on a variety of styles of music, during three of their best years that feed into each other, this just might be the most vital box set released yet.

  • Edhead70
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    Joined:
    Been diving back into these…

    Been diving back into these gems over the last week and I must say the shows really are great. This an incredible box set and one to for sure pick up. There’s a variety of play from rockin dead to full blown interstellar play by the boys.
    I can’t say I like one show more than the next since they are all different and feed all the jonesing one may have for one type of show or another. Not to be missed.

  • FiveBranch
    Joined:
    Thought I would give some of…

    Thought I would give some of this material a few more listens before the new box makes its arrival at the end of the month. Last night it was 10/17/72 and the show I've been least familiar with. Shame on me. What it lacks in BIG JAM material is more than made up for with consistently solid rhythmic interplay and at up-tempo speeds. Solid and riveting. Remember the 1980s maxell tape ads, with the guy in the east chair getting literally blown away from the power coming from the speakers? That was me for three hours.

  • mrmojorisin7
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    Really looking forward to…

    Really looking forward to getting this sometime, crazy that flippers on eBay are expecting people to buy it for the same price as it is on dead.et store!

  • daverock
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    What a privilege

    To meet and talk properly with Robert Peterson - thanks for sharing that, Billy.
    I looked on Amazon UK last night and couldn't see any books of his poetry - maybe the one you mentioned is only available in the U.S. at the moment. I'll keep my eyes peeled.

    I have just looked again - and Alleys of the Heart is there - but it is really expensive. So definitely - print it on here!

  • billy the kiddd
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    Daverock/ Robert Peterson

    My brother met Robert Peterson, on 4/28/85 at St Micheals Alley in Palo Alto. They hung out all day and walked over to the Frost Ampitheatre together to see the Grateful Dead that day. He left my brother an autographed copy of his book Far Away Radios. He wrote inside, "To Paul, no more hard time. " My brother said he was a real nice guy, a real cool person. He also wrote a book called Alleys of the Heart, which I see is for sale on Amazon.

  • daverock
    Joined:
    Robert Peterson

    Listening to 6/24/73 from the PNE box, I started re-reading Nicholas Meriwether's opening article in the accompanying book. He makes several references to Robert Peterson, best known to me for his collaboration with Phil Lesh on, I think, four songs. Anyway, reading this made me feel that I would like to read more by Peterson, but there doesn't seem to be anything easily available. I think it would be great if Deadnet could publish a collection - something very different from their usual fare of extras! I'd go for a book like that over a tee shirt any day.

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What's Inside:
7 Previously Unreleased Complete Shows On 20 Discs
Fox Theatre, St. Louis, MO 12/09/71
Fox Theatre, St. Louis, MO 12/10/71
Fox Theatre, St. Louis, MO 10/17/72
Fox Theatre, St. Louis, MO 10/18/72
Fox Theatre, St. Louis, MO 10/19/72
Kiel Auditorium, St. Louis, MO 10/29/73
Kiel Auditorium, St. Louis, MO 10/30/73
Sourced from tapes recorded by Rex Jackson, Owsley "Bear" Stanley, and Kidd Candelario
Mastered in HDCD by Jeffrey Norman
Restoration and Speed Correction by Plangent Processes
 
Individually Numbered, Limited Edition of 13,000

Steamboats and BBQ, ice cream cones and Mardi Gras - are you ready to laissez les bons temps rouler with the "gateway" to the Grateful Dead? Meet us, won't you, in St. Louis for seven complete and previously unreleased Dead concerts that capture the heart of the band's affinity for the River City.
 
LISTEN TO THE RIVER: ST. LOUIS ’71 ’72 ’73 is a 20CD set featuring five shows from the Fox Theatre - December 9 and 10, 1971; October 17-19, 1972; and two from the Kiel Auditorium - October 29 and 30, 1973. 
 
The seven shows in the collection span slightly less than two years, but they represent some of the best shows the Grateful Dead played during some of its peak tours. The music tells the story of a band evolving, changing from one sound to another seamlessly, precipitated – in large part – by significant personnel changes in the Dead’s lineup.
 
The two 1971 shows feature the original Grateful Dead lineup plus newcomer Keith Godchaux on piano. This version of the band would hold together for the next six months as the Dead embarked upon its Europe ’72 tour. By the time the Dead returned to the Fox Theatre less than a year later, they were without Pigpen, who’d played his final show with the Dead at the Hollywood Bowl on June 17, 1972. A year after the exceptional Fox 1972 shows, the Dead came back to St. Louis, but played the much larger Kiel Auditorium, touring behind the release of WAKE OF THE FLOOD, which came out just two weeks before.
 
All told, the band played 60 different songs during these shows highlighted by blazing romps through “Beat It On Down The Line” and “One More Saturday Night” and wistful takes on “Row Jimmy” and “Brokedown Palace” (whose lyrics give the collection its name). Meanwhile, the copious jamming ebbed and flowed like the mighty Mississippi River on multiple voyages through “The Other One” and “Dark Star.” Naturally, the band paid tribute to one of its favorite rock and rollers and one of St. Louis’ biggest stars by playing Chuck Berry songs at every show in the collection, including Pigpen galloping through “Run Rudolph Run.”  
 
Each show has been restored and speed corrected using Plangent Processes with mastering by Jeffrey Norman. The collection comes in a slipcase with artwork by Liane Plant and features an 84-page hardbound book as well as other Dead surprises. To set the stage for the music, the liner notes provide several essays about the shows, including one by Sam Cutler, the band’s tour manager during that era, and another by Grateful Dead scholar Nicholas G. Meriwether, among others. 
 
Due October 1st, LISTEN TO THE RIVER: ST. LOUIS ’71 ’72 ’73, is limited to 13,000 individually numbered copies and available exclusively from Dead.net.

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all you cats and kittens out there in deadland, love and peace to you all.

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50 years ago today......

January 2, 1972
Winterland, San Francisco, California

Set 1: Truckin'-Sugaree-Mr. Charlie-Beat it on Down the Line-Loser-Jack Straw-Chinatown Shuffle-Tennessee Jed-El Paso-You Win Again-Big Railroad Blues-Mexicali Blues-Playing in the Band-Next Time You See Me-Brown Eyed Women-Casey Jones

Set 2: Good Lovin'>China Cat Sunflower>Good Lovin'-Ramble On Rose-Sugar Magnolia-Not Fade Away>Goin' Down the Road Feeling Bad>Not Fade Away

Encore: One More Saturday Night

Deadicated to Charlie Knutson, because was there ever in anyone's life span a point free in time, devoid of memory, a night when choice was any more than the sum of all the choices gone before?

OK, calenderically speaking 1972, but very much “of a kind” with the December 1971 shows.

Let’s clear up a couple of things. First, in the first set, there’s no “Leave Your Love At Home” between Chinatown Shuffle and Tennessee Jed. Second, in the second set, there’s no Know You Rider following China Cat, the band definitely goes back into Good Lovin.

Though not quite as intense as December, it does have a decent dose of Pigpen, and the rare, possibly unique Good Lovin’/China Cat Sunflower/Good Lovin’ sequence. Another rarity----in the first set, two consecutive Garcia songs followed by two consecutive Weir songs. The show is generally well played, but opinions of it seem divided. Many absolutely love it, while others find it lacking because there’s no “big jams”. Decide for yourself, there is a Miller remaster and it definitely worth having…..

Questioning the origin of music is like asking why the breeze is soothing, why you shiver in exhilaration when the spray from the waterfall hits you….

Rock on!!

Doc
Music is my therapy and my straitjacket......

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There couldn't be anyone on this forum who hasn't benefited from the good Doc's yeoman efforts to elucidate the nuances of 1971 and, therefore, a major transition period in the band's history. Thanks Doc!

Now to pile on a specific point: the business of whether a show is a success based on the presence or absence of "big jams." Let's be clear: no first set, no jammy second set. The first sets up the second, both in terms of warming up the players to begin to expand their sensibilities, and in clearly, concisely articulating melodic songs that provide the textures for weaving later in the evening. That's when there is a "big jam." But, I think, folks miss the point that this band isn't your favorite orgasma-tron, there for launching everytime you buy a ticket or plug it in. These guys are/were human and rooted in structured music, which enabled them to stretch out when the mood hits them. Yes, they are rightly renowned for the "big jam," and went for it frequently. But a show without a big jam is still a triumph of well-played rock 'n roll and I caught a few. One in which we counted more than 30 songs played. All played balls to the walls with plenty of soloing, etc.

I could change my name from Hendrixfreak to Mr. Big Jam and it would ring true. But my (overwrought) point is that it's ridiculous to judge a show based on whether the orgasma-tron got plugged in or not. For criminy's sake, enjoy what the band plays. (Unless it's Pigpen doing 'Hey Jude'.....)

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In reply to by hendrixfreak

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What surprised me about The Dead when I first started listening to them is that they are only occasionally psychedelic. As I have written before, they came to my attention through the English music press saying bands like Hawkwind and Gong were British or, in Gong's case "Franglaise" versions of The Dead. Both Gong and Hawkwind-certainly at that time, the early - mid 70's, seemed to live in "the zone". From the moment they appeared on stage to the moment they shambled off it they tripped the light fantastic. So it was quite a surprise to hear a band they were being compared to trot out versions of Chuck Berry, Hank Williams etc, songs. That isn't a put down of The Dead - they have endured for me - but they weren't quite the band I thought they'd be when I eventually heard them.

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Yo!! Rockers!!!

In the depth of winter I finally learned that there was in me an invincible summer…..

Dear friends, my work here is done. Mission accomplished. I have carried the torch of 1971 live Dead for a long time, and will continue to do so. But now it will be in the background, lurking, watching, and continuing to listen. In order to understand the world, one has to turn away from it on occasion. It is normal to give away a little of one's life in order not to lose it all. Perhaps a return to normalcy. Nobody realizes that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal…..

I made it through the 50th anniversary year relatively unscathed. This really isn’t the best forum for detailed analyses of every show, but every show did get its due. To all, enjoy the wonderful music that the Dead left us that year………….

I’ve tried to acknowledge everybody I encountered during my long strange trip here. If I left you out, sincere apologies and no offense intended….

I will continue to be a resource for all those interested in the music of the Grateful Dead in 1971. Or any other year. Or any other band, because, after all, no one can live on Grateful Dead alone. Believe me, I’ve tried! No limits, no restrictions, no questions asked. I’m just a pm away. Real generosity toward the future lies in giving all to the present. Your successes and happiness are forgiven you only if you generously consent to share them.

There is a life and there is a death, and there are beauty and melancholy between. Thinking is learning all over again how to see, directing one's consciousness, making of every image a privileged place.

I look forward to lurker mode. For anybody who needs or wants some light reading material about 1971 Dead shows, you know where to find me…….

Since the day of my birth, my death began its walk. It is walking toward me, without hurrying…..

Rock on!!!

Doc
This man is freed from servile bands,
Of hope to rise, or fear to fall,
Lord of himself, though not of lands,
And leaving nothing, yet hath all.

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Bravissimo on you. Gonna miss your '71 insights, and the way you shared them. Enjoy your sabbatical. Onward.

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In reply to by JeffSmith

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Shall we go

You and I

while we can

4.22.69

Restarted the show on SiriusXM and Went outside when it was dark with everything still frozen in ice. Spinning Dark Star right now and it's getting light outside

Dave L.SD send out a few shows with Mountains of the Moon

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What a box set this year might look like. Is it time for another compact '60s box ala FW69? If so, '69 would be the year. Otherwise, the curveball might be an '80s box. The cray-cray choice would be locational, such as a Red Rocks set of the best shows that followed July '78 (NOT August '78), such as Aug 12, '79 and then early '80s.

I'm flailing, no idea what DL has in mind and he loves it knowing his ideas never leak.

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In reply to by hendrixfreak

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We aren't even a week into the year and HF is clamoring for a 69 Box.

Gotta love it.. I couldn't agree more. Release some 60's Dead Lemieux or we are going to storm the vault. Our pitchforks are sharp and our torches soaked with pitch. Don't get between an angry mob and 1960's Grateful Dead. It's a tinderbox down here Dave, ark us. ark ark.

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I have it on good authority that the next box set will be the Wall of Sound. Not "from" the Wall of Sound. Not "about" the Wall of Sound. It will Be the Wall of Sound.

It will include all shows (three dozen, I think) played from 3.23.74 through 10.20.74 (including those that have already been officially released). It will be three stories tall and 90 feet wide and weigh 75 tons. It will include exact and functional replicas of all 600-some JBL speakers and MC-2300 amps, and will include the hidden baggies of cocaine in actual amounts the crew needed to construct the actual WoS. When properly assembled and cranked to full volume it will be audible from outer space. You will sell your home in order to buy one.

We now return you to your regularly scheduled nonsense.

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In reply to by Crow Told Me

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guessing game

box: Ark 69.

Better yet, Boston 69. April Ark and December Boston Tea Party.

We'll probably get "highlights from Boreal Ridge" (snark)

my old joke: "what does a dosed (yellow) dog say?" "ARK! ARK! ARK!"

OK, back to my livelihood...

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that no one takes me seriously??

But at least my nonsense has drawn the usual suspects back into the discussion from wherever they were lurking. I like the mambo, full-scale WALL OF SOUND concept. So, will it be subdivided so we can rent some living quarters? Cuz my current house will fit neatly inside, say, the vocal cluster over Billy's head. Which puts Billy in jeopardy should I, um, use the bathroom...

Okay, punters, step up and take your shot. Who'll prostrate themselves before the almighty WALL and toss a box idea into the ring? What? Got the Insurrection Blues?? Now THAT I understand.

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Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in.......

IF the missing reels have been located and/or returned, I would vote for a Fillmore West February 1970 box. Or FE September 1970, if THOSE missing reels reappeared..........

I've almost always advocated for a Fall 1972 Texas box, and still do, but Listen To The River makes that unlikely.

Rock on!

Doc
He who doesn't fear death dies only once............

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Fillmore West Feb 70 or Fillmore East Sept. 70 box sets , for me it could not get any better then that. Boy, I sure hope that comes to pass.

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But I don't know if we'll get our Red Rocks. Agreed the Aug. '78 RR would be a better 2 show 4 CD DaP than anything else. Not everyone likes those as much as I do being my 3rd and 4th shows. A little too slow and precise after the barn burner July shows. Wild guess for a locational box? Why not Vegas?
Cheers

It seems like they have been oscillating a bit between classic suites of shows where two track reels exist (think St. Lous) and multi-track of later era shows (like the giant box for example). I bet that cycle continues for a bit with a few adds/subtractions.

We do need a sixties release.

We also need a box set.. hopefully sooner rather than later.

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In reply to by JimInMD

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Maybe they should release more boxes, and drop the Dave's Picks to make way for them. These "special offers" and bonus discs are a bummer-it's like shopping in a supermarket. "Buy one get one free" sort of thing.
If there were 4 boxes a year - and three were made up from 1970 and 1972, as has been suggested below, I'd order without hesitation. And if the other one was from the late 70's, 80's or 90's I could pass it by - but it wouldn't bother me. Whatever the configuration was wouldn't bother me-even if it meant just getting one some years. Maybe 4 would be pushing it a bit - but 3 would be alright.
Maybe some of the merchandising could be sacrificed along the way, too, to make way for the good stuff.

I'd love a box from the first Winterland run of '77; was listening to 3/19 yesterday and was like "WHY is this not released???" That suite of 3 shows are pretty special, containing the first ever Scarlet > Fire along with the only time they did the extended Terrapin suite (at least part of it). I get that a whole lot of 1977 already exists officially and some (including me) might have some exhaustion there, but this is a short little run that delivers big, Plus the shows on the archive all sound utterly fantastic.

Hat in the Ring.
HF isn't cray cray!

Be Well People.
Sixtus

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a) HF is indeed cray-cray...
b) the Aug '78 shows at Red Rocks, IMHO, aren't worthy of release
c) daverock, currently I drop $100 on the annual subscription, $200 on the annual box and ... that's $300. If they abolish the Dave's series and go to three boxes per year, that's $600 or double my current outlay. So, for selfish reasons, I say no. But consider: who the hell is going to cancel a best-selling series with his name on it?

But we're all free to speculate and wish for our favorite pipe dreams.

Do I recall correctly that Dave recently said that 2022 was going to be so busy that they pushed one project back to 2023?

I'll say this about getting older: my perspective changes, unannounced, on previously bedrock issues. Will my seemingly insatiable need for archival rock n roll suddenly dissipate in a year or two? I think that a fixed income retirement might well trigger such a change. So Dave's plan to go on for 15+ more years puts me at age 79. Looking down the road, I can see my interest flagging somewhere along the line. I kinda dread it.

Enjoy the coffee. We have 5 degrees with lots 'o snow in Denver this morning. Sorely needed snow.

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just heard JM has covid and will not perform, also Billy the K will not perform as his heart is beating to a different drum these days. Also heard they were not going to give refunds until there was an uproar about that, with covid spiking and all, I don't think it's such a good idea to continue with this run of shows.

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In reply to by hendrixfreak

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I couldn't see them dropping Dave's Picks. They have no problem selling out 25k subscriptions for four shows (plus a few ala carte). The box sets can take a some time to sell out and with the exception of Get Shown the Light, 15k is the most they have sold. 13k Listen to the River Box Sets were printed, is an exceptional selection of music, is still for sale and likely will be for some time come. I think the PNW took years to sell out, July 78, also excellent took a long time to sell out.

I'm not entirely sure why this is true.. but it is. Dave's Picks are more desirable to more people than these monster box sets for some unknown reason, call it buyer psychology or marketing mumbo jumbo or whatever. They sell more of each show and don't have the warehousing headaches of holding on to inventory making these individual shows appear to yield more revenue per dollar spent remastering and packaging than box sets. With a limited number of great shows left in the vault and apparently a higher revenue per show from DaP than other options.. there is a very low chance they are going kill this golden goose anytime soon.

My two cents, I could be wrong.

______________________________________

As for a Winterland Spring '77 mini-box. Man, that really is a good fit. I know it's come up before, but the timing for works, a three set mini-box. If not this year than next.

Lemieux.. don't muck this one up like you did Winterland February '74! We will never forgive you. Spring '77 box or bust, our pitchforks are sharpened, torches tarred.

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yes, 1970 box would be great, also shows from the spring of 70, that college circuit tour with all that revolution in the air. I'm not getting any younger and sure would like to see some of these classic shows released before I leave this plane.

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In reply to by PT Barnum

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8/31/78 is one of the first shows I got on tape back in...83? Always love it.
Boxes only? hmm. might be a stretch, but I don't know what they have in the vault still release-worthy.
The entire Wall of Sound? THE Wall of Sound? I'll take it.
Dave: how did he get the gig he has? The GD never asked me to be their vault master.

I hereby pledge to keep my emotions and comments in check on this dubious anniversary.

It _is_ my wife's birthday, and the pleasant anniversary of 1/6/78. :)))

I enjoyed seeing some guy build his own mini wall of sound, home version in his basement or man cave or whatever. Cost him a small fortune, apparently sounds great. Money well spent, love it. If I won the lottery, my new man cave would have a mini wall of sound.

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In reply to by hendrixfreak

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Hendrixfreak - my tastes in The Dead have changed enormously since I first heard them. When I first got access to tapes - about 35 years ago, it felt like an incredible voyage of discovery. I couldn't get enough - any era, partial sets, audience recordings. - whatever. Of course, they were all free. As the years have passed I seem to enjoy certain years more than ever - but other years not so much. I sometimes think it's weird still liking this music - and rock n' roll in general, at my age-64. None of my friends are like this.
I wonder how much a vinyl box set of E72 would cost?

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In reply to by daverock

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How much would a vinyl box of Europe 72 cost?

Nothing refinancing your house couldn't cure.

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Daverock, I got exposed to the GD in '69 with Live/Dead and couldn't "get" Dark Star until later. Then my older broth spun WD, AB and Skullfuck around 1971 and I got hooked. First show a year later. Then the taping craze. I first got reel to reels of some of the April '71 FE shows and used a friend's reel-to-reel to make cassette copies. Then GD and Jimi cassette trading via snail mail. Then digitization struck, no more generational concerns and full on frenzy.

Let's see... 1971 to 2022 is 51 freakin' years... (ouch!) So, would it be fair to say that, after that heritage and the modern era of archivial CD releases (~1990 onwards?), including hundreds of GD shows, we've become connisseurs and developed well-informed palates for our favorite eras as well as styles of performance (laid-back, balls to walls, songs vs. jams, various instrument choices by the band, etc.) and thus here we are with HUNDREDS of shows officially released, another jillion on hard drive (thanks Doc!) and even a stray box of aud cassettes in the basement that I can't bring myself to toss.

I may not be typical, and I claim no expertise, only preferences. They say an appetite is a chef's best friend, so perhaps the only downside to my situation is a slightly jaded palette. At least I'm long past having to have it "all."

Just a few thoughts as I work my way slowly, lovingly, through Listen to the River. And naturally I wonder what Dave might toss our way this year. Spring '77 is always welcome if not a revelation. (I did catch shows in 3 states that spring.) Feb '74 is way welcome, as pre-hiatus is my bag. I think a '60s release -- whatever happened to Oct. 20-something '68 (I'm slipping) that went out on vinyl with that silly cartoon book? Can they throw us that on CD this year for a lark?

I always end up wanting more of that dangerously explosive '68 dragon band. So I'm just another old (64) crank needing a bigger dose to get off and wondering if we've passed my train station?? Maybe just the January blues...

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I also hope that when it comes time to releasing the March 77 Winterland shows, that they do it as a box set and they don't chop them up ; I was at those shows and they are all good. As far as found and returned reels, that could open up all kinds of possibilities, the whole 1968 tour of the Great Northwest would be great. That whole Sept 1970 Fillmore East run, like Doc mentioned, would be incredible. Again, it all depends on what tapes have been found or returned, but it doesn't hurt to think positive.

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In reply to by JimInMD

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He's doing a fundraiser for a 1/2 scale at this point.
Stacks are featured in a new video, that go up into the second story of his living room.
The Wall of Sound Lives.

Sixtus

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Roughly $2800 + very expensive shipping + crazy expensive custom duties for international heads.
Comes with a hand truck and storage shed.

HF - curiously I wasn't too impressed with Dark Star the first time I heard it, either. This was the one played at Wembley 4/8/72. About 24 minutes of it was included as a side of the commemorative "Glastonbury Fayre" album, released to celebrate the festival of 1971. I would have got that around 1973-74. I didn't click with their albums until 1976 - Anthem, Americam Beauty - Live Dead - I much preffered this Dark Star, and I liked the power of the double drum set up. Plus, my horizons were considerabley expanded by 1976 compared to 1973.

I think it's fair to assume that my tapes were a bit further down the evolutionary chain than the ones you would have got! Plus my cassette player was not exactly top of the range. Still.....the message got through.

One of my most cherished memories of listening to The Dead was in the car, being driven by my girlfriend round the West Coast of America in 1990. My favourite tape at that time was 9/28/72, and we were listening to Playin in the Band from that as we drove over Golden Gate Bridge. It felt very different listening to The Dead travelling through America than it did sitting at home in my flat in England. It seemed to directly connect with the landscape somehow.

Cousins....maybe it would be better if they just released half of E72 on vinyl. Actually...maybe just one more show would be more practical.

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I had just turned 12... Turned instant Hendrix freak that summer... BUT I think with Dark Star, a) looking back, I didn't have the gear to turn it up properly, b) it was too abstract for someone still excited by 3 minute singles on the radio, and c) I just didn't have the mental/musical bandwidth to "get it." Once introduced to blotter, however, it made a helluva lot of sense. One of my favorite scenes in the latest GD movie was Robert Hunter, laying on his back, reciting the lyrics to DS, then sitting up and -- perhaps in response to an interviewer's request to "explain" the lyrics, saying, "What could be clearer?" And here we are, so many years later...

Daverock, cool story on blasting GD as you crossed the Golden Gate Bridge. That is a cool part of the country and, of course, ground zero for GD-related shenanigans. Cold and expensive, but ground zero nontheless...

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In reply to by PT Barnum

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October 1978

Winterland March 1977 box set

I would buy both if they put them out

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"A Bunch of Deadheads Are Now ‘Stranded’ in Mexico after Dead & Co. Fest Cancel" - Rolling Stone

"Stranded
cries the south wind
Lost in the regions of lead
Shackled by chains of illusion
Delusions of living and dead"

What's become of the D&C show, this cold January morning....

Dark Star did not immediately congeal for me either, it took some time before I warmed up to it. In fact, in the very beginning on more than one occasion I would FF past it to get to the parts of the show I liked.

I'm sure I've said this here before but my tastes are always evolving and changing.. in food/wine/women/music.. in just about anything I am into my tastes change and evolve over time. Rarely do I FF a DS these days, I might pause it until I am in a better position to appreciate it but other than that I'm all in.

Driving listening to GD.. my favorite memory was driving into Tuscon for the first time. I literally took my favorite tape with a Jack Straw and pre-planned it so the line "Half a mile from Tucson by the morning light" would be playing as we approached the city not coincidentally as the morning light was being reflected off the window. Silly I know, but here I am reflecting on it 37 years later with a grin on my face.

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I do not put Dark Star on road CD compilations. Not safe. Even a Bird Song is dangerous, for me. I space out and, while it's truly amazing how much one's senses can handle, I like to be "present" when hurtling down the highway at anything over ~50 mph. Even though I've driven home from work without actually paying any attention at all. Suddenly, I'm in my driveway, etc.

For one thing, out here, I spend a lot of time in NW Colorado, NE Utah, SW Wyoming, in the backcountry. But to get there you're at first driving pavement. The area is thick with wildlife. For many years I didn't understand why the ranchers and farmers drove ~50 mph at dusk and thereafter ... until, separately, I almost ran into a herd of elk and a gaggle of wild turkeys.

So, no DS, no PitB, it's gotta be songs under, say, 7-8 minutes. Even a monster Sugaree can be hazardous to my health, at least over 50 mph. Even at home, I make a conscious decision to put on a DS. I do not take it lightly. A testament to the power of those boys to jam both abstractedly and meaningfully, at the same time.

Sorry to keep posting, boys. I'm off my feet now for 18 days and at least 10 more to go until I get this boot off my right leg and begin PT to get back on track. The key is to not put weight on it. But I am listening to a lot of new music and getting lots 'o time with my guitars.

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We love 'em! Sending positive healing vibes. Also a west slope guy and familiar with the nighttime hazards out here. Close calls in high school on the front slope in Turkey Creek canyon visiting hippy friends back when that was the hot spot for let's get the hell out of Denver before it got crowded there too in the mass exodus. Out in the S. Denver prairie the pheasants seemed to aim for me a lot, always glancing blows off the windshield. Do those little plastic deer whistles I have stuck to my front bumper really work? No idea but I haven't (knock on wood) hit one yet after 40 years on this side of the hill. I can space out driving to about any tunes. Doesn't take much to pull my mind from the task at hand. Had to drive to Glenwood this week and coming home in the dark I realized I hadn't driven a highway at night in like 10 years. Way out of practice but we got the sick mamma home in one piece after her helicopter ride from Montrose due to Covid messed up hospitals and no urologist. Get yer shots folks! (preaching to the choir here, we're all smarter than that)
Last five. 12-31-76
JGB NorCal
DiP #3 (still a fav.)
2021 30 DoD on random spin (flash drive)
Fleetwood Mac- Future Games (reissued vinyl)
Cheers all!

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I Dark Star and drive.

I sometimes forget to exit.

Dark Stars carve through time, when I listen to them while driving, on average the commute time is decreased by approx. 30 minutes. No one knows why.

After my father died, in 2009, for about 4 years, I used to drive a 430 round trip every couple of weeks to see if my mother was okay. It was a great drive, and I would sometimes listen to a whole show - some of the longer 1973 shows fit almost exactly for the way there or back. But Dark Star didn't really help me on my way too much. I would have been going at twice the speed of sound, so much rock n'roll and high energy music was what kept me focussed. Nowadays I don't drive at all if I can help it - but I did like it back in the day.

HF - hope you are back on your pins again soon.

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I'm indeed on the mend, hoping for good outcomes when the next phase of recovery comes. And my load is light, compared to so many. Paz!

....most should come with a warning label.
Come to think of it, I haven't listened to a Dark Star this year. Fixing that now. Going with Portland 6.24.73. -> Eyes -> China Doll -> Indica.
Is the PNW Box sold out yet?
Happy healing Hendrixfreak.
BTW. Bought tix for Melvin Seals and JGB today. Playing here on the 28th. First time for me.
Edit. Seven minutes into this Dark Star and it already took on a different format, led by Phil. Awesome.
The Dave's 40 page is all about Sugaree currently. Don't forget about the 10.17.83 first set opener people!!

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....so much so, that one of my dogs woke up from her nap with a WTF look on her face. It's ok Lucee. It's just Jerry doing Jerry things. She's OK now.
This Dark Star is a muddled masterpiece that spirals into precise non-control.
No second verse. Onto Eyes.

why Candyman? "If I had me a shotgun, I'd blow you straight to hell"

I thought I had locked my car. (NFBM)

Some cockbiting mofo got into my car last night and ripped me off. (If I had me a shotgun...)

2022 has had some highlights, but overall it has been groundhog day 2020.

Most peoples is good
Some peoples are hit and miss
Some peoples are feces samples with legs

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Sorry to hear that, proudfoot... I think you were the one whose catalytic converter (and your son's?) got torn out last year. About two months ago, same thing happened to me, in a public parking lot on a busy street in broad daylight. Desperados or organized crime, we'll never know. But it's reaching epidemic proportions.

Bottom line: stealing is a dirty, low-down act that -- often more than the loss itself -- injures your faith in the innate goodness of humanity. How one acts when everyone's back is turned is what creates karma, in my view.

Best of luck recouping your faith. After my theft, it took weeks to wear off.

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if it's not catalytic converters, it's other things.

the scumbag didn't take my CD of Live Dead, though.

Every morning before work, I play two songs on my phone: Husker Du's "New Day Rising" and Motorhead's "Stand." Time for that ritual, my fellow Deadheads.

Thank you for the kind words, HF; y'all be cool.

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