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    Who's ready to boogie with a little Brent-era Grateful Dead from the Gateway to the West? DAVE'S PICKS VOLUME 47 features the complete unreleased show from Kiel Auditorium, St. Louis, MO, 12/9/79 and you're going to need stamina because this one is high energy from start to finish.


    By the time December 1979 rolled around, Brent Mydland had fully cemented his place in the Grateful Dead canon with his twinkling keys, harmonic tenor, and songwriting skills. No more is that evident than at this show boasting 25 songs including soon-to-be classics from GO TO HEAVEN like "Alabama Getaway," "Don't Ease Me In," "Lost Sailor," and the Brent-penned "Easy To Love You." It's also packed with whirling takes on fan-favorites like "Brown-Eyed Women," "Shakedown Street," and "Terrapin Station." And you've never heard a 2nd set quite like this with eight songs before "Drums" including an improvised "Jam" launching from the end of "Saint Of Circumstance." It doesn't stop there though, with a blazing finale of "Bertha>Good Lovin'" and perhaps one of the best versions of "Don't Ease Me In" the band ever did play. We've rounded out Disc Three with an extra nugget from '79.


    Limited to 25,000 numbered copies, this release was recorded by Dan Healy and has been mastered to HDCD specs by Jeffrey Norman at Mockingbird Mastering. Grab a copy while you can.

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  • icecrmcnkd
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    Uncle Tripel throws a wrench into the works

    More 12-4-79 filler would really upset the people who were hoping for the rest of 10-24-70.

  • uncle_tripel
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    what y'all think...

    1979-12-04? could it be the filler you're looking for?
    it would certainly round out that daP 51 very nicely, right?
    1970-10-24, well, you know Dave won't be that predictable lol or...?
    Peace All!
    uncle_tripel

  • jonathan918@GD
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    Filler

    The filler on disc 3 from 12/4/79 is stunning! Stella Blue in particular is an all-timer to these ears!

  • Sixtus_
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    GFAR

    I say, well done! Going through a second time with the knowledge of the first pass can only enhance!!
    Thanks for checking in.

    Be Well My Friend!
    Sixtus

  • Gary Farseer
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    Hey Now Sixtus

    If you see this, wanted to update you. Last years "Undertaking" turned out to be awesome. Getting ready for the second trip through the Series. Last year, by watching them in quick succession, I really harvested much knowledge on the overall story line.

    G

  • icecrmcnkd
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    Speaking of single CD’s

    11-01-73% is some good stuff.

  • icecrmcnkd
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    DP 1,2,3…

    CD’s were around $20 each in the 1990’s, so the early DP’s had to be kept short so people were willing to spend the cash.
    Back in those days I spun DP2 way more than DP1 or DP3 (which are both awesome).

  • Sixtus_
    Joined:
    Speaking of 1970

    Holey $hit, just went back in time on a random spin'O the wheel and got 're-acquainted' with The Fillmore from 6/6/70 and holy cow that jam out of Alligator.
    This is the stuff.

    The whole show just smokes Back To The Future Tire Tracks all over it.

    Sixtus

    P.S. Jimmy in a parallel universe my Forager is hanging right next to my Workingman's Hatchet

  • JimInMD
    Joined:
    DiP 2

    That Dark Star is an all-timer. Is cosmic over used here? If not, it's a cool, especially cosmic Dark Star which reminds me, I can't seem to find my Cosmic Mushroom Foraging Tool. Has anyone seen it? Bet it happens to you folks all the time too.

  • proudfoot
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    Dick's Picks 2

    I had a very magical experience with that disc years ago at Discovery Park in Seattle. I listened on a CD Walkman.

    One of the top 10 GD experiences for me.

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Who's ready to boogie with a little Brent-era Grateful Dead from the Gateway to the West? DAVE'S PICKS VOLUME 47 features the complete unreleased show from Kiel Auditorium, St. Louis, MO, 12/9/79 and you're going to need stamina because this one is high energy from start to finish.


By the time December 1979 rolled around, Brent Mydland had fully cemented his place in the Grateful Dead canon with his twinkling keys, harmonic tenor, and songwriting skills. No more is that evident than at this show boasting 25 songs including soon-to-be classics from GO TO HEAVEN like "Alabama Getaway," "Don't Ease Me In," "Lost Sailor," and the Brent-penned "Easy To Love You." It's also packed with whirling takes on fan-favorites like "Brown-Eyed Women," "Shakedown Street," and "Terrapin Station." And you've never heard a 2nd set quite like this with eight songs before "Drums" including an improvised "Jam" launching from the end of "Saint Of Circumstance." It doesn't stop there though, with a blazing finale of "Bertha>Good Lovin'" and perhaps one of the best versions of "Don't Ease Me In" the band ever did play. We've rounded out Disc Three with an extra nugget from '79.


Limited to 25,000 numbered copies, this release was recorded by Dan Healy and has been mastered to HDCD specs by Jeffrey Norman at Mockingbird Mastering. Grab a copy while you can.

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In reply to by proudfoot

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I guess, though the more I learn about him….ok, no dissing the Deceased…
Perhaps He and Lee can work all that BS out now?
Who’d a thunk old Garth would be last man standing. You go Garth!

Whoooaaaa, just realized, some other sorta important Guitar player died on August 9th….spooky.
They’ll be some jams for sure!

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In reply to by Oroborous

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Lol, makes me think of one of my favorite South Park episodes. Cartman as an exterminator, tapping on an old womans walls, “I’m sorry mam, you have Hippies, I hate Hippies”
I identified more with the Beats and their culture and mores than the Hippies, but can boogie with most freaks!

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In reply to by proudfoot

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Will be running a marathon of GD/JGB music this evening, toasting with Jerr and now Robbie.... finishing off 47... just as soon as I get the jungle lawn cut. Wake of the Flood indeed. When I went off to college in Maine in 1970, I seemed to be the only one playing the Live Dead album on near daily basis, interspersed with Anthem and Aoxo. Had I arrived in the right place? Then I found people listening to Music from Big Pink, Savoy Brown and J Geils.... next they brought Alan Ginsberg to campus so he could read from Howl, I started to dj for the campus 5 watt station, all was good.

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He wrote Broken Arrow but Phil got it from the Rod Stewart cover.
I'll be honoring him by playing his excellent self-titled solo release.
It's killer. It has mood. Travel onward Robbie.
Cheers

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In reply to by 1stshow70878

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We all might stop off at Nicks cafe this evening…

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I am sure some around here (hometown) would say...always depends on hair and beard length.

Gonna post again a quick intellectual debate. The last time I posted this, probably early 2016, it got overlooked or panned by folks.

I really wish Bob would comment on this.

But in 2016, I wondered if Estimated Prophet/Profit!, was written regarding Charles Manson. The song seems to fit him so well. I think of the electrician (?) knocking at backdoor of Winterland in the Movie. Charles was released from prison in early March 1967, if memory serves, and went immediately to the Haight. That is why I see him as a backdoor man, just trying to get in and sell his wrap/bullshit. I was thinking maybe the entire Organization of hippies for the most part rejected his overblown ego and self importance. "Standing on the beach, the sea will part before me...Fire wheel burning in the air. You will follow me, We'll rise up to glory (or we will ride to glory), way up in the middle of the air."

Just another rabbit hole for me. I posted again today because I was reminiscing about Chocolate George, the Hell's Angel and his funeral. Back when we could post, I had found video segment that showed the angels funeral procession along with video of the dead playing after the funeral, and had the board tape edited in. It was a very short clip. If you search Chocolate George's funeral you will find lots of stuff. But in 2017, it looks like a 50th anniversary of the summer of loveeb site was created. Has article about Manson on front page. I have not had time to read yet. Maybe after I open my skull in a bit. the web page is summerof then an actual dotlove/history.

Now to tie the two together. When you see Chocolate George's funeral procession, you kind of get the sense that maybe the S.F. crowd told him to shove off. I am sure his wrap did nothing for the angels. As within just a few weeks he was back down near L.A. starting his little empire.

One last thing, has any one seen Outlaw Chronicles - the story of the Angel's George Christie. It is really a very interesting watch, lasts several episodes and several hours. He moved the LA Angels to Ventura. As all this stuff has always interested me since I was a kid. Then, over time, I will explain more. But dealt with a local BC here back in the mid-late 1980's. Wanna talk about the free flow of...

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While not a huge fan of the ego that broke up The Band, the man undeniably left a massive imprint on what we think of as rock, folk, Americana, or just music, period. I have no clue what The Weight is about, but damn if it ain't one of the greatest songs ever put down. And The Band had a few dozen of those level songs. Indisuptably, he penned the lyrics. More up for debate, is how much credit the other guys should have gotten for their contributions to the music. But, avoiding that to think about this 15-16 year old Canadian Indigenous person (who learned early in life to hide that part of his heritage) who tore up the Canadian circuit with Ronnie Hawkins and the Hawks. Then cutting out with Levon and the Hawks, then joining Dylan in going electric as The Band. Levon was a tough guy, but even he couldn't take the booing and quit, and Mickey Jones finished the tour. Dylan's motorcycle accident and The Band living nearby at the Pink House is now legend. As far as his guitar playing, no less than Duane Allman is said to have cited Robbie as his favorite guitar player. An authentic rock legend.

Got my DaP 47, have ripped it. Like the gatefold as Vguy mentioned, and noted that DaP 31 has it as well when I grabbed it to re-rip the filler to sit with its companion pieces. Looking forward to listening. Just got the computer set up last night, and luckily, just checked and the music cannot be heard in the bedroom over the AC (even maxed on my computer), so wife is blissfully ignorant of my goings on in my new music room. So far, in Promised Land, it sounds like 1979-80, tinny keyboards (but constantly in the mix, unlike Keith, who was often largely absent), Phil with a different sounding thunder on the Irwin bass, the drummers more ensconced in their own giant sets, and Jerry sounds like he's having a ball early on, Bob seems more prominent in the mix than Jerry so far. The liner notes were interesting. Almost like Dave is saying "12/1/79 isn't coming out for a long time, and I'm going to turn you onto the shows that are better that tour first", which i don't get, 12/1 has a Black Peter, what more does Dave require? I'd like some more Altheas if we're gonna be in an era where it's played.

Gary, out of curiosity, what were you doing at Hanes Mall in Winston-Salem the day Jerry died? Did you live near there?

What if the rhyme on 48 doesn't mean '68, but '88? I'll take 7/2, which leaves a gaping hole for some prime filler.

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In reply to by alvarhanso

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....don't get me started.
Does the music sometimes fade into the background? And then a certain switch flip occurs that perks your ears?
It just happened to me during the second set Loser at 6.9.73.
Second set Losers are tight!
And it's a grate one.

Gary - yes, that's an interesting theory. From my memory of the mid 70's, there used to be certain type of "hippie", slightly older than my generation - maybe 25 to my 18, who assumed the role of men of wisdom. Men...and it always seemed to be men... worth listening to. I remember a guy like that in my home town. A bit older. He had a beard, his own flat - even a girlfriend! A beautiful woman of about 19, who stared at you and rarely spoke. And when she did.... she whispered. They informed us about meditation, and came out with statements probably filched from the Bhagavad Gita or somesuch. And of course, they sold a bit of bob hope on the side. Quite intimidating in way, but harmless enough.

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Hey Daverock, I remember the first hippies I ever met, they were older than I, yes and their attitude and demeanor were so laid back. The first time I met them a long haired dude and the sweetest of sweet little lady who when we entered asked us if we would like to smoke and offered up an assortment of smokables on a beautiful art and crafts type rolling tray. They were so cool, she said, "Would you like to try some of this tasty oaxaca that we have" and off we went.
I was shocked this morning when I read that David Laflame had also passed away, what a talent. I'm sure that everyone who ever saw the It's a Beautiful Day perform would agree. Have several of their albums, the first with the lady on the cover is an all time favorite and a classic with hits like "White Bird" and "Hot Summer Day" and of course "Wasted Union Blues" great song title that one. Other lp's followed but their first was their best. Marrying Maiden and Choice Quality Stuff are both good too. The compilation 1001 nights is a good one that puts them all together on one lp.
My record collection is starting to look like "works from the graveyard" everyone seems to be leaving us.
RIP Robbie and David, man that Heart of Gold band is really getting crowded.

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His solo lp is so good, and of course his work within the Band is legendary. I had a real love/hate thing going with him but that is in the past, nothing but love for a great musician now, may the four winds blow you safely home somewhere down that crazy river.

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Sorry to hear David Laflamme has passed. My friends and I wore the grooves out of that first IABD album (great cover, too!), and their second was pretty decent, too. I saw LaFlamme years ago oddly enough on an episode of Frasier!
As for Robbie, my hometown hero. I was lucky enough to see the original Band twice, but their show on their finale tour, leading up into The Last Waltz, was one of my best concerts ever. I found myself asking myself why these guys would want to quit when they were so damn good.
Godspeed gentlemen, into that good night.

…THEY, didn’t want to quit, only Robbie did. He tried to make it out like “they” did, but it was only him.
Heard this straight from Lee himself around the time they were getting offered millions to do a reunion at Carnegie Hall. The Band and especially Lee could have really used the bread.
That’s how hurt and stubborn Lee was about Robbie breaking up the band: he’d rather be broke…

Of course the Band kept on in one form or another and eventually Jimmy Weider took over the guitar slot and did a Hellava job! The 90s Band was sweet if perhaps not the monster they once were.

Oro - I agree the guys were pretty sore at Robbie, Levon especially. Robbie argued that Lee, Rick and especially Richard became major fuck ups and too unreliable to record or tour, and I’m sure the truth is somewhere in the middle. I’m not defending RR, and I found his film (Band of Brothers) and his book kind of self-serving, but lots of bands break up, and the guys don’t crash and burn like those guys did. They did live hard, and maybe there was truth to what RR said. Maybe Garth is the only guy that knows? But regardless, they made music for the ages. Timeless.
PS - I agree with VGuy that August 9 kind of has an aura about it now.

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In reply to by That Mike

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Same old story and I know it's been told

Some like jelly jelly

The vast majority like gold.

Easy for me to say, but if I had 2 million in the bank, I would gift some to my bandmates.

But I don't have 2 million in the bank nor former bandmates, so maybe I'm full of brown acid.

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… any Love for the dead’s ‘STARLIGHT THEATRE’ - AUGUST 3, 1982 performances from the entire band ! Bob is really nailing it during crucial parts of the performance on every song. Jerry is on top of his game! Jerry’s guitar playing seems to be pouring out his fingers going down the frets of the guitar! Fire indeed! The first set is one of the strongest in a long time! 11 songs if I remember correctly. The second set shows the band flying down the train tracks with a a killer “ Casey Jones!” As an encore . Very rare at this point in time in the dead’s playing.
The second set contains amazing good Ol Grateful Dead musicianship as a band! Grateful Setlist as well! Anyone else a fan of this show??
Beautiful’Stella Blue’ very sweet!
One of my favorite ‘he’s Gone’ primo!
Setlist 1
Mississippi Half-Step
Franklin's Tower
New Minglewood Blues
Peggy-O
El Paso
Cumberland Blues
Althea
Cassidy
Big Railroad Blues
Man Smart/Woman Smarter
Might As Well
‘Set 2’
Shakedown Street
Samson and Delilah
To Lay Me Down
Let it Grow
drums
He's Gone
The Other One
Stella Blue
Sugar Magnolia

Casey Jones

Yes, I’d say the truth is skewed a bit towards the middle, but as you say RR could be very self serving. Probably why he did so well on his own, especially with film etc. And yeah, those boys weren’t always the most professional.
I got to work several dozen shows with them in the nineties and there were definitely some sub par outings that usually could be attributed to use, or more likely, being without and not being able to…I remember this one show in Houston in 96 at some small dumpy club. Horrible super short show. Pauly the roadie told me Lee wanted to stop after like 3 or 4 songs. Pauly said he kept having to tell him “Lee, you just started, it’s only been like a half hour” etc.
But the majority of shows, though perhaps short, we’re very enjoyable. Some nights, usually if there was more incentive than the endless crappy clubs, you could still witness the greatness first hand. We were on stage with them when they opened for the Dead at those last Chicago shows, and they played great. With Jimmy Weider, Randy Ciarlante on drums, and the great Richard Bell on piano, I saw nights that were amazing. And what a dance band!
I danced way more at Band shows in the nineties than Dead shows.
I think if they’d been playing the caliber of shows they had become a custom too, they would have been more motivated and thus professional. Traveling hard and playing clubs is tough enough even if you’ve never been that famous.
Yeah I can understand Robbie’s POV, and he certainly is justified in personally wanting more/different, but it’s the way he went about it that leaves a bad taste.
Honestly, I think much of it was Lee didn’t know anything else but playing, so like Bob and Jer needed to be playing, it’s who he was. So I think maybe deep down he was bummed that Robbie sorta took that away, for awhile at least. He overly blamed Robbie for breaking his heart more than anything, and so turned that into anger…and hey, sometimes it’s easier to put the blame elsewhere?
But Boy it would have been cool to see them get together even if just for that Carnegie reunion run. The band was tight then and Robbie would have just been the Cherry on top!
Really it’s all just a shame they couldn’t have worked something out besides all or nothing…
Oh well, as a former muscian I’ve always said being in a band is like being married to several people.
The musics the easy part it’s all the rest that makes and breaks bands.

Great post, Oro, and you raise some really valid points. You have first hand knowledge, and that had to be an incredible trip being with them (and I agree on Jim Weider’s guitar prowess). I know the guys were also pissed that RR never shared songwriter credit (and the incredible royalties), but why were they not equally upset at Dylan for excluding them for songwriting on the Basement Tapes? Excusing Lee being a late arrival to the Tapes, I cannot believe that Tears of Rage (Richard) and This Wheels On Fire (Rick) were the only two songs they helped shape? Garth and RR contributed zilch!? So why didn’t they have an axe to grind with Dylan?
So there is a lot of here say and egos and anger that did them in, and that was unfortunate. But the stories you tell are great, and it had to be a hell of an experience to see them play first hand.
We know, too, how destructive drug addiction can be - look no further than Jerry and Brent. And with three of them heavily into junk, Robertson must have felt like it was nailing jello to a wall trying to get them sober enough to record. I’m just saying a lot of stuff is hung on RR I don’t think was fair.

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In reply to by alvarhanso

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I was in W-S to start on my master's degree at Wake Forest. As it had been a while since undergraduate degree, they wanted some of the older folks to attend an advanced math boot camp to reinforce/prepare for the coming math onslaught. Started boot camp on August 7th. The camp was 7am till noon for five days.

WFU gave me a great education. Previously I had been what is called a "Lead Negotiator" for the federal govt. Just had to get out of there, as by working harder, I was honored by doing the work of the many less than acceptable employees. Now as I approach 60, I am semi-retired and have worked from home almost 15 years. So things worked out well. Have time to read and sometimes post here.

More later on Robbie, other topics here.

Still we must smile smile smile

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In reply to by That Mike

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Pecan Lover's you can order excellent pecans from Priester's Pecans near Montgomery Alabama.

I owned a house in the early to mid 90's. It had three huge pecan trees. Each tree was one of the three different pecans types.This house sat on land of an old southern plantation that had a pecan grove that stretched almost 15 miles. The trees were well over a hundred years old. Had years with heavy to no yield of pecans. Use to gather them by the bushel in the good year. Used to give a bunch to my grandmother who only lived a few streets away. What did I get back? Pecan Pie of course. Now, been decades since I had a slice.

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In reply to by That Mike

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Good point about Dylan Mike.
A lot has been written about the royalties too.
I can understand both points: the old school record company gives credit to one person etc, versus the group band mentality. As a musician, I felt like I contributed to the original music by creating my part and other little tid bits, phrases, a word here or there, even though technically I did not “write” the song. Does that mean I should get credit or not? In RR defense, how did they not know, and when they figured it out, why didn’t they do something then?
This is an old problem going back as far as modern recorded music itself. Not an easy answer, but from my perspective, I’d say they should have gotten more credit than they did, but perhaps not as much as Levon thought…
But as you state, same situation with Bob D and I don’t recall ever hearing them complain there so?
Yeah, good question Mike! Again, just too bad all the BS had to mess with the music.

EDIT: yeah well when it came to abuse Robbie was no boyscout either. He just got his shit together sooner and moved on. I don’t doubt there’s truth to what he says, especially in the 70s, but again, I think some of that is him putting English on the ball to make himself look good, or not the bad guy anyway.

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In reply to by Gary Farseer

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I ask, as I grew up in Winston and Greensboro. My dad was a faithful Wake fan, which is sad given their long history and single Final Four. But I always gave him credit for sticking with them, rather than abandoning them. But, how do you not make a Final Four with Tim Duncan? Though, given your life experience, I'm sure the hardwood exploits were the least of your concerns in grad school. Glad it was a good experience, I have only heard it's a great school. I'll bet you got very familiar with Baity St and it's awesome Ziggy's, home of Roots, Rock, Reggae. If you were there until '98-99, we probably attended a lot of the same shows. A college buddy saw Aquarium Rescue Unit open for Phish there in '92. My dad caught the Ramones there twice, still have one of the ticket stubs.

Awesome stories, Oro! Sad, too.

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Great arguments all, Amigo, and really great stories.
Clarence Darrow had nuthin' on you!! :]

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In reply to by PT Barnum

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PT - they sound like a nice couple who you met all those years ago. There were some very kind people about then, in the hippie world. The first time I tripped was with a couple like that. They seemed very caring, in a world that wasn't usually like that. Being a bear of little sense, I thought I'd try 2 or 3 tabs. I was given half of one, which seemed quite insulting at the time. Two hours later I was so high I couldn't speak.

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In reply to by Oroborous

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Of course you deserve credit. Is it a band or not?

I always look to RUSH: both the band and the feeling. Rush decided very early on that they would divide the royalties 3 ways. They were having some issues and they came together with that plan, as documented on one of their documentaries. Much easier to do with Rush because all three contributed pretty much equally all the time.

So yeah, I always had issues with RR. That has mostly melted away. It comes down to the fact their was only one dirt farmer (cotton) and that was Levon in the band. Now maybe Hawk rubbed off on the others and gave them some redneck swag, but I doubt it. No disrespect, but how could a Canadian write "The Night They Drove Ole Dixie Down?" when he was a far stretch from understanding what that was like. I watch The Last Waltz a couple of times a year. And once, always Thanksgiving Day.

Speaking of Hawk...another Hawk, Taylor Hawkins, was contacted by Dave Grohl for an audition (going from memory on a few things) after someone contacted DG looking for a drummer. DG gave Hawkins a call to get him to go audition but Hawkins told him I would rather join Foo Fighters. Hawkins made it clear he wanted to be in a band, not the drummer for a solo artist (that artist being Alanis Morissette, who he worked for not auditioned for). So, I doubt that DG gave all equal rights like Rush, but I also doubt DG treated his band the way RR did. Just one guy's uneducated opinion.

Edit: Rush's Geddy Lee said once we established equal royalty rights, that issue was over and never was revisited again. Harmony! What a great name for my new upcoming boy band.

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In reply to by Gary Farseer

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....they transformed into a different band every four records.
Fact check me on that, because it's not fake news.
RIP Neil Peart.
Paging keithfan2112!
Did you know if you put a mirror in the middle of the 2112 cover, a devil appears?
Badass.
I grew up in the middle of the heavy metal = Satan Worshipping era.
It was hilarious.
My parents even had to have an intervention at one point due to my obsession with music. Esp the loud music.
My bedroom was plastered with magazine inserts and tapestries. And I hadn't even discovered weed yet!
Had to take them all down.
I threatened to run away.
I did. For five hours.
I miss the 80's.
Edit. Maui is burning. Bill The Drummer just posted on IG re it. Over 40 dead.
I donated $20 to the cause.

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In reply to by Gary Farseer

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Liked (and like) em both. Agree GFar on your comments. Read This Wheels on Fire years ago, a good read and gave me a much deeper perspective on their history and chemistry. Rush was one of my first concerts. I think I was 13 or 14 give or take. What were my parents thinking? I was lucky to see them early, they were hot, hot, hot especially in their early years.. and my ears could take the volume back then. High energy rock and roll.

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All of these were streamed today, even though I own the albums it was easier than searching for them:

‘Chrome Dreams’ - Neil Young

‘… at Newport’ - Joni Mitchell

‘50 years of hip-hop BBC Radio1extra mix tape’ - Various Artists. This is an hour long mix of tracks from 1973 - 2023. In the UK it’s available on iPlayer if you have a licence.

‘Ask Me No Questions’ - Bridget St John, this is a great album from 1969 that originally came out on John Peel’s Dandelion label. Somewhere I have the LP.

‘The Big Huge’ - Incredible String Band. This is still one of my all time favourite albums.

UPS tell me that my #47 is out for delivery. Since it’s said this since yesterday morning I’m not holding my breath. Hopefully I’ll see it early next week although it’s the hope that kills you!

just some old duffs having a nice conversation, everybody wins!
About as close to sitting round the bar playing verbal tennis as we'll get these days lol
Though I love to talk too much in general, I particularly love talking about music, sweet music!
And it’s always nice talking with you!
Happy Fri Yea Dead Freaks!

Hope y’all get to enjoy 47 asap. I know I’m looking forward to another go round this WE!

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once at the infamous last show of Richard Manuel and the set at Woodstock 94, Don't remember much about the Cheek to Cheek in Winter Park, Fl show, except we all thought it was far out that the Band was playing in such a small place, I mean only about 4 hundred people or so, it was a pretty classy place back then. No other memories remain.
The show at Woodstock was really good, Bruce sits in and stays thru Bob and Rob's set, stepping in towards the end of the Band's set with and Eternity and I think a Fever and a Throwing Stones for the ages. That was such a good time, wish the entire Grateful Dead Band would have played but it was real nice that Bobby and Rob came out to play. Big Fun

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Carousel Ballroom 1968

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10 years 1 month
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Greetings to You All.

Just thought I might share a bit of news and perhaps, add to your music enjoyment and appreciation. Sixto Rodriguez, (Rodgriguez), crossed over a couple of days ago. If you are not familiar with him or his music and you have the time and patience, you might appreciate the documentary 'Searching for Sugar Man'.

NPRdotorg had a nice write up yesterday.

Hope Everyone has a beautiful day.

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9 years 9 months
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Olathe Sweet sweet corn crop decimated!
Check your PMs.
Cheers

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9 years 7 months

In reply to by Oroborous

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Right back at you, Amigo! I could chat music all day.

PT Barnum - It’s both cool and tragic seeing Richard Manuel’s last show. One for the ages.

Incoming - Neil Young “Chrome Dreams”

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It’s arrived in Nottingham - no duties to pay, thankfully!

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In reply to by frankparry

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My #47 has just been posted through the letter box.

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16 years 11 months
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#4077 has arrived in Scotland. Listening to the bonus material from the windy city first and it's superb. Saving the main course for this evening. Enjoy your Saturday and keep on keeping on (and smile).

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In reply to by frankparry

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Which one's Greta?

Couldn't resist...

Good to see our international buddies are finally getting their copies of Dave's

Long drive today...Kezar 73 is the expected show.

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I think I dig the gentle, lilting qualities of Set 1 a bit more here. God bless him , but Bobby seems to be in Try too Hard mode for the 2nd. 11/24 is my fave show from Fall ‘79. Hopefully we will see it released some fine day. Either way, the sound quality with this and all DFave’s is a revelation rarely to never heard elsewhere. Thank you.

....yeah. And he spits a lot at times.
Edit. So my son got one of those Playstation VR headset things. Holy shit. Talk about brain activity going into 5th gear. Incredible tech but they do have a disclaimer saying an hour at a time.
Understandable. It awakens certain....cortexes.
The NFA from the philler here is good.

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